XC90 safety at freeway speeds
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    1. #1

      XC90 safety at freeway speeds

      Hi Folks,

      This is my first post here.

      I currently drive a bmw 328i and have a 2 year old daughter. I have become very concerned about road safety ever since I became a dad and was drawn towards Volvo as I started doing research on safe vehicles. I am glad that a company like Volvo exists who take safety seriously and not just as a checklist item to pass IIHS tests.
      I am blown way by the results of small overlap test of XC90, it just glides through, all other brands seem to take the full impact and come to a halt or swerve sideways. I am planning on upgrading to a XC90 even though financially it is a stretch for me.

      I wanted to know how safe the vehicle will be at free way speeds (65mph, I don't drive above limit), I am convinced this vehicle is perfectly safe at city speeds (35-45mph) as all crash test ratings [IIHS] ]are at these speeds.

      Scenario 1: Running into stationary objects.
      I guess there is no chance of survival even in a XC90 in a crash at 65mph into a stationary vehicle/pole, my only hope is that the automatic braking system will engage and will bring the XC90 to a complete stop in this scenario.
      My question: Is my assumption correct? Will the XC90 come to a complete stop when it detects a stationary vehicle at >65mph speed? Can it also detect a pole/tree whose width is much less than a typical vehicle and auto-brake? What about the scenario where the collision is not head-on but is diagonal, will the car detect and apply brake?
      In this scenario, I guess the Boron steel doesn't have much advantage, will XC90 be same as any other car with crash-avoidance tech?

      In the flip case of XC90 being stationary and a vehicle traveling at >65mph and ramming in to XC90, I guess there is no chance of survival regardless of Boron steel and crash-avoidance systems.

      Scenario 2: Running into moving car.
      Traveling at 65mph and hitting something going at 40-60mph. Again the crash avoidance system should kick-in in frontal crash scenario. In the scenario of a side-ways or rear collision, I am assuming the Boron cage of XC90 will provide better protection than other cars.

      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?


      At what speed does Volvo test in their Safety Center?

      Do they test at the same 35-45mph as IIHS or do they try to replicate freeway conditions? Is there any data on the max speed the XC90 can withstand before inflicting serious injuries to occupants.

      Thanks!

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    3. #2
      Global Moderator GrecianVolvo's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by smith_xc90 View Post
      Hi Folks,

      This is my first post here.

      I currently drive a bmw 328i and have a 2 year old daughter. I have become very concerned about road safety ever since I became a dad and was drawn towards Volvo as I started doing research on safe vehicles. I am glad that a company like Volvo exists who take safety seriously and not just as a checklist item to pass IIHS tests.
      I am blown way by the results of small overlap test of XC90, it just glides through, all other brands seem to take the full impact and come to a halt or swerve sideways. I am planning on upgrading to a XC90 even though financially it is a stretch for me.

      I wanted to know how safe the vehicle will be at free way speeds (65mph, I don't drive above limit), I am convinced this vehicle is perfectly safe at city speeds (35-45mph) as all crash test ratings [IIHS] ]are at these speeds.

      Scenario 1: Running into stationary objects.
      I guess there is no chance of survival even in a XC90 in a crash at 65mph into a stationary vehicle/pole, my only hope is that the automatic braking system will engage and will bring the XC90 to a complete stop in this scenario.
      My question: Is my assumption correct? Will the XC90 come to a complete stop when it detects a stationary vehicle at >65mph speed? Can it also detect a pole/tree whose width is much less than a typical vehicle and auto-brake? What about the scenario where the collision is not head-on but is diagonal, will the car detect and apply brake?
      In this scenario, I guess the Boron steel doesn't have much advantage, will XC90 be same as any other car with crash-avoidance tech?

      In the flip case of XC90 being stationary and a vehicle traveling at >65mph and ramming in to XC90, I guess there is no chance of survival regardless of Boron steel and crash-avoidance systems.

      Scenario 2: Running into moving car.
      Traveling at 65mph and hitting something going at 40-60mph. Again the crash avoidance system should kick-in in frontal crash scenario. In the scenario of a side-ways or rear collision, I am assuming the Boron cage of XC90 will provide better protection than other cars.
      Welcome.

      Your questions are very complicated, hence there will be no easy answer.

      Yes, in case you are coming up against a stationary vehicle (not a pole, I hope you will not be seeking advice on how to avoid poles) the system will first make a determination of what it is you are about to hit. Pedestrian/cyclist detection does not work at speeds over 43 mph. If it is a vehicle, you will get a visual and audible warning. As the risk of a collision increases, brake support will be activated which means that the pressure on the brake pedal will increase in case you do not apply enough pressure. The next stage is "auto-braking"; if you do not take enough action to avoid the collision, full braking effect will be used to prevent the collision, if possible. If the collision cannot be avoided, the car will try to reduce the speed as much as possible.

      Auto-braking can be an abrupt action or start with limited braking action before transitioning to full braking action.

      Your seatbelt pretensioners will also be activated.
      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?
      Adaptive Cruise Control is different than collision avoidance. If you have adaptive cruise control on, it will be hard to crash against another vehicle. If it were to fail, then collision warning/avoidance will take over.


      At what speed does Volvo test in their Safety Center?

      Do they test at the same 35-45mph as IIHS or do they try to replicate freeway conditions? Is there any data on the max speed the XC90 can withstand before inflicting serious injuries to occupants.

      Thanks!
      There are many different tests done there and their complexity is unmatched by any other manufacturer. One part of the building is floating on air cushions which pivots in order to perform crash tests at every possible angle. No other manufacturer has such ability

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    4. #3
      Member phillipu's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by smith_xc90 View Post
      Hi Folks,

      This is my first post here.

      I currently drive a bmw 328i and have a 2 year old daughter. I have become very concerned about road safety ever since I became a dad and was drawn towards Volvo as I started doing research on safe vehicles. I am glad that a company like Volvo exists who take safety seriously and not just as a checklist item to pass IIHS tests.
      I am blown way by the results of small overlap test of XC90, it just glides through, all other brands seem to take the full impact and come to a halt or swerve sideways. I am planning on upgrading to a XC90 even though financially it is a stretch for me.

      I wanted to know how safe the vehicle will be at free way speeds (65mph, I don't drive above limit), I am convinced this vehicle is perfectly safe at city speeds (35-45mph) as all crash test ratings [IIHS] ]are at these speeds.

      Scenario 1: Running into stationary objects.
      I guess there is no chance of survival even in a XC90 in a crash at 65mph into a stationary vehicle/pole, my only hope is that the automatic braking system will engage and will bring the XC90 to a complete stop in this scenario.
      My question: Is my assumption correct? Will the XC90 come to a complete stop when it detects a stationary vehicle at >65mph speed? Can it also detect a pole/tree whose width is much less than a typical vehicle and auto-brake? What about the scenario where the collision is not head-on but is diagonal, will the car detect and apply brake?
      In this scenario, I guess the Boron steel doesn't have much advantage, will XC90 be same as any other car with crash-avoidance tech?

      In the flip case of XC90 being stationary and a vehicle traveling at >65mph and ramming in to XC90, I guess there is no chance of survival regardless of Boron steel and crash-avoidance systems.

      Scenario 2: Running into moving car.
      Traveling at 65mph and hitting something going at 40-60mph. Again the crash avoidance system should kick-in in frontal crash scenario. In the scenario of a side-ways or rear collision, I am assuming the Boron cage of XC90 will provide better protection than other cars.

      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?


      At what speed does Volvo test in their Safety Center?

      Do they test at the same 35-45mph as IIHS or do they try to replicate freeway conditions? Is there any data on the max speed the XC90 can withstand before inflicting serious injuries to occupants.

      Thanks!
      Something else to keep in mind is the physics of the situation. The statement "no chance of survival" is awfully severe even when considering the speeds you mention. There are absolutely people who have survived impacts at those speeds. Getting broadsided by a semi-tractor at 65 mph is definitely a worst case scenario. But a Smart FourTwo hitting you at the same speed will yield much different results.

      Hitting another vehicle moving in the same direction at you but slower yields an impact that is the net speed difference while hitting one oncoming is additive. So if you rear end someone going 40mph when you're going 60mph would be similar to hitting something stationary at 20mph. Those same two cars at those speeds hitting each other head on would be the same as hitting a stationary object at 100mph. The mass of each vehicle is also important as is the potential loss of control that might lead to secondary collisions.

      The adaptive cruise control and Pilot Assist absolutely help you avoid accidents if not by intent then by default. It is designed to slow you down to match the speed of the vehicle in front of you as long as the initial speed difference is not too great when the vehicle in front is detected. It won't necessarily stop you from running into a parked car or vehicle that is already stopped at an intersection but if you're following a vehicle in traffic as it comes to a stop, so will the Volvo. It's not technically the same as the collision avoidance tech that City Safety provides but it is effectively going to stop you from inadvertently running into someone if you take your eyes off the vehicle in front of you for a bit. Setting a longer follow distance makes it that much more effective.

      Safety may not have been the first reason I bought the Volvo but it is absolutely something I am glad to have and if it is a first priority for you I can't think of a safer vehicle.

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    6. #4
      You are overthinking it. There are too many variables to consider to predict the injuries, but you can rest assured the XC90 is one of the safest cars (if not the safest) on the road today.

      It looks like the system avoids an accident at 70 kms/h (43 mph), and anything higher, if not avoided, at least the speed will be reduced significantly:


    7. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by carz View Post
      You are overthinking it. There are too many variables to consider to predict the injuries, but you can rest assured the XC90 is one of the safest cars (if not the safest) on the road today.

      It looks like the system avoids an accident at 70 kms/h (43 mph), and anything higher, if not avoided, at least the speed will be reduced significantly:

      We might need a handy guide on what vehicles look like after they are wrecked. Maybe a link to one of the Volvo Saved My Life doohickeys.

      I've seen pics of an XC60 sandwiched between two semis where they just opened the door and the two ladies inside got out and were sent to the hospital for a routine checkup. We have had a couple of flipped XC60 and XC90s here on this board in the last few months that were astonishing in how the vehicle looked afterward.

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    8. #6
      Junior Member tillsbury's Avatar
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      I guess there is no chance of survival even in a XC90 in a crash at 65mph into a stationary vehicle/pole

      Not sure where you get that from. I'd say there was almost a certainty of survival unless you were extremely unlucky with the pole's position and strength. A head-on with you both at 65mph perhaps not, especially if the other is a truck. But otherwise I think you're being very pessimistic.

    9. #7
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      I cannot answer the question but maybe my fresh experience would help. I can say that Volvo safety mechanisms (City safety or whatever it was) saved me from hitting the car in front of me.
      We were driving on a highway that was partially under construction (note that the european highways differs country by country so you may have highway with really sharp turns). What happened that because of construction there was a traffic jam building up and I was just coming from behind the corner so I didn't see it to react in advance. The same happened to car in front of me since the driver slammed on brakes and turned to other line to not hit car in front of him.
      I started braking and at one point Volvo used their own braking. It also used the seat belt tensioners which was quite impressive since it felt like someone hit you from the front into the seat (I estimate that it took good 10-15 centimetres from the belt, approximatelly 4-6 inches).

      At the end the car stopped without any issues, there was even 1-2 metres space in front of the car.

    10. #8
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      One thing to add. You should not forget the Volvo statement that no one should be killed or seriously injured in new Volvo car by 2020. I know that there are still few years to go but I believe the majority of the safety systems is there (not in the final version as they are still being upgraded but are there).

      When we were choosing our car safety was the priority because our 10 months old boy. And Volvo was top pick for us also because it takes real courage and trust in your own people and technology to publish such statement.

      On the other hand, don't forget that there are lots of safety mechanisms in case accident happens (whiplash, airbags, boron steel cage and Volvo on Call that would automatically calls for help in some cases).


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    11. #9
      Member Gary-16-Xc90's Avatar
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      Safety was in my top three needs list - not only crash tests, commitment to safety and technology but also insurance. I was very pleasantly surprised that my auto insurance premiums went down by ~ 20% from my 2007 4Runner Sport - everything else being exactly the same. I think that speaks volumes to safety.
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      You sound like me. My baby will be a year old in June. I went to look at the XC90 on the day of my wife's baby shower.

      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?


      Last Friday we were heading out of town on a busy highway in stop and go traffic. I was using adaptive cruise and PAII when the cars in front of us made an abrupt stop. I was paying attention but the car is normally pretty good at this so I let it do its thing. It was apparently too much for adaptive cruise so the collision prevention kicked in just like Yannis said it would above: Flashing lights (now I'm going for the brake!) and seatbelt pre-tensioners fired off. It scared the crap out of us and the car behind us nearly hit us, but we stopped in time and no one was hurt.

      As for your other scenarios, no car can protect your family 100%. That's just life. All you can do, and what I did, is buy the safest car for them that you can afford. The M1 Abrahms is out of my price range, so here we are :-)

    13. #11
      I would like to add one thing that I was told by a Volvo engineer when I did some technician training in Rockleigh.

      When we discussed crash tests that the national safety people perform on vehicles for the mythical "star crash rating' he told me that other vehicle manufacturers purposely build up vehicles in certain spots in order to make them pass these tests with "5 stars". He then told me that Volvo does not build vehicles to pass crash tests but rather builds them to be crashed into and then survive what happens after. Example: vehicle t-bones you and your volvo rolls over or flies into a poll. The engineer stated that the vehicle construction and "cage" around the passenger compartment was made to survive multiple accidents.

      Ignore all the fancy electronic crap that may or may not help you prior to crashing and focus more on how the vehicle will perform when crashed. At the end of the day, the electronics are not full proof.
      Last edited by gunshow; 04-19-2017 at 07:19 AM.
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    14. #12
      I recall reading somewhere that the collision avoidance system reduces your speed by up to 40 mph. So if you are going under 40 then it would bring you to a complete stop. IF you were going 65 mph then it would reduce you to 25 mph. And in this case if the car ahead was going 40 mph would more than likely avoid the collision altogether.

      I had the system kick in on the highway yesterday. I was traveling about 70 mph with the pilot assist engaged. A car cut in front of me - the yellow light flashed (the reflection on the windshield) then quickly went to red, then solid red with beeping. My seat belt tightened up and I slowed down to about 45 mph very quickly..........frankly it scared me.......but I was safe. My daughter was in the back seat and she noticed that we slowed down but it really didn't bother her.

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      Quote Originally Posted by gunshow View Post
      I would like to add one thing that I was told by a Volvo engineer when I did some technician training in Rockleigh.

      When we discussed crash tests that the national safety people perform on vehicles for the mythical "star crash rating' he told me that other vehicle manufacturers purposely build up vehicles in certain spots in order to make them pass these tests with "5 stars". He then told me that Volvo does not build vehicles to pass crash tests but rather builds them to be crashed into and then survive what happens after. Example: vehicle t-bones you and your volvo rolls over or flies into a poll. The engineer stated that the vehicle construction and "cage" around the passenger compartment was made to survive multiple accidents.

      Ignore all the fancy electronic crap that may or may not help you prior to crashing and focus more on how the vehicle will perform when crashed. At the end of the day, the electronics are not full proof.
      Don't forget that Volvo is doing their own crash tests and have their own crash investigation team in Sweden. Good example is old XC90 and small overlap test. Not saying other car manufacturer don't do that, but I feel like Volvo's commitment to safety is one of the top priorities.

    16. #14
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      Quote Originally Posted by gunshow View Post
      Ignore all the fancy electronic crap that may or may not help you prior to crashing and focus more on how the vehicle will perform when crashed. At the end of the day, the electronics are not full proof.
      Well, no. I say don't ignore it. Yes, the car will handle a crash very well.
      But the technology, more than likely, will keep you from experiencing that in the "normal" situations where the majority of crashes occur.
      With ACC or PA2, you not only benefit from the vehicle keeping you from running into the car in front of you - but - the car behind you also benefits because your speed and distance are managed (avoiding your need for panic stops).

      The technology makes YOU - and the people behind - less likely to be involved in a crash.
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    17. #15
      Thanks all for your valuable inputs. Cleared up some of my confusions, I was under the impression that collision avoidance only works till 42mph, good to know that it significantly slows down the vehicle from higher speeds.
      So I will have to get the convenience package, looks like it significantly improves safety.

      I tried searching the internet to see if there is any data on how the XC90 fares at different speeds but couldn't find any. Looking for something similar to the 60Kmph vs 100kmph test as in this video:


      I would also like to know how reliable ACC/PAII is on farm roads/undivided high ways, this video of Tesla scared me, the car incorrectly tried to follow the oncoming car from the opposite direction, any idea how the XC90 would behave in a similar situation?

    18. #16
      Member phillipu's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by smith_xc90 View Post
      I would also like to know how reliable ACC/PAII is on farm roads/undivided high ways, this video of Tesla scared me, the car incorrectly tried to follow the oncoming car from the opposite direction, any idea how the XC90 would behave in a similar situation?
      I have never experienced the Pilot Assist feature attempt to guide me into oncoming traffic on two lane roads that I've used it on. That being said, such systems are fallible. It has tried to guide me off the highway at times when passing an off ramp, for example. You must keep your hands on the wheels at all times. The least reliable situations I've experienced have been the aforementioned off ramps and curves in the road.

      Adaptive Cruise Control has no steering capability and would not apply to your concern about being guided into oncoming traffic.

    19. #17
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      There is an official video demonstrating how Volvo replicated a crash that occurred in real life involving two volvo v70's crashing into each other head on, you should see that.

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=so2wJJPge88

    20. #18
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      Quote Originally Posted by smith_xc90 View Post
      Hi Folks,

      Scenario 2: Running into moving car.
      Traveling at 65mph and hitting something going at 40-60mph. Again the crash avoidance system should kick-in in frontal crash scenario. In the scenario of a side-ways or rear collision, I am assuming the Boron cage of XC90 will provide better protection than other cars.

      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?
      I share GrecianVolvo and others comments and would add the following to the above questions:
      Scenario 2:
      In a head on collision, there's very little the Volvo could do. You'll definitely hit the other car and depending on the speed of the other car and yours, the damage could be extensive. See Youtube videos on Volvo crash tests for more.

      Scenario 3:
      Though when using adaptive cruise control or Pilot Assist it would be difficult for the car to crash, it is likely tocrash if your following distance is set at the shortest distance and the car in front stops suddenly and road surface slippery. At freeway speeds of 65Miles/ hour as you've asked, try setting the following distance at the maximum distance for that extra safety.

      BMW drivers in my country, especially of powerful cars, have a bad reputation. I know this is a generalisation, but if you drive your car reasonably, there should be less worries from your side, and it'll improve your concentration levels against lunatics who might be jeorpadising your safety.

      Good luck
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    21. #19
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      Click the first image to be taken to a recent report of an accident in an XC60. This was rolled over a few times and this is what the XC60 looked like.


      This image was from an incident where the owner of the XC90 was broadsided at 60mph and rolled the vehicle.

      Another image


      The original thread was archived unfortunately due to some issues with belligerent sand pounders and the story isn't available direct from the source.

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    22. #20
      At the dealer level, we get pics of wrecked Volvo's quite often.

      I have seen a chevy 1500 hit a 2008 XC90 head on (in Kentucky I believe) and the lady in the XC90 only had a shattered ankle from slamming on the brake pedal upon impact. The drunk driver in the truck was ejected.
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    23. #21
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      I know many here take some of these for granted. We have seen a lot of these videos. The IIHS one is pretty telling, IMO. It just glides off the overlap test--as does the S90, if it makes any difference.

      XC90 vs Q7 Small overlap test


      Run Off Road Protection


      Crashing the XC90 on Fifth Gear

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    24. #22
      As an Engineer, Root Cause Investigator and Probabilistic Risk Analyst, I believe that the Volvo family of larger vehicles is the safest you can purchase today.
      But the active safety features can't be quantified yet, because these systems are very new and offered by different manufactures not to any standard.
      Manufactueres do not provide techincal data to determine the difference and quantification of safety. One would think that the manufacturers use common systems and equipment but no one knows at this point.
      My newest vehicle has ACC and PAS(Porsche Active Safe) and Blind Spot monitoring among othe features.
      Better than Volvo or MB or BMW, whio knows but what I do know is that if I knew I was going to be in a collision, I would be better off in a large Volvo.
      So if you are gauging your safety by the newer active safety features, I think you are looking at the wrong criteria.
      Volvo does it's own crash testing as correctly Posted to Volvo standards. Volvo does not 'game' their design to 'pass' the NHTSA testing. Volvo's rollover testing of the new XC60 is very impressive!
      After a survey of what's out there for active features, I have decided that another Volvo will probably be the next purchase we make based on passive structural features alone.
      There is not enough engineering information or real world performance data to evaluate which vehicle has the best active safety features, yet.
      Volvo's goal of no deaths by 2020 is the only statement I know of by any vehicle manufacturer and if you don't have a goal, you certainly have no chance of attaining that goal.-Richard
      Last edited by budrichard; 04-21-2017 at 07:41 AM.
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    25. #23
      Quote Originally Posted by smith_xc90 View Post
      Hi Folks,

      This is my first post here.

      I currently drive a bmw 328i and have a 2 year old daughter. I have become very concerned about road safety ever since I became a dad and was drawn towards Volvo as I started doing research on safe vehicles. I am glad that a company like Volvo exists who take safety seriously and not just as a checklist item to pass IIHS tests.
      I am blown way by the results of small overlap test of XC90, it just glides through, all other brands seem to take the full impact and come to a halt or swerve sideways. I am planning on upgrading to a XC90 even though financially it is a stretch for me.

      I wanted to know how safe the vehicle will be at free way speeds (65mph, I don't drive above limit), I am convinced this vehicle is perfectly safe at city speeds (35-45mph) as all crash test ratings [IIHS] ]are at these speeds.

      Scenario 1: Running into stationary objects.
      I guess there is no chance of survival even in a XC90 in a crash at 65mph into a stationary vehicle/pole, my only hope is that the automatic braking system will engage and will bring the XC90 to a complete stop in this scenario.
      My question: Is my assumption correct? Will the XC90 come to a complete stop when it detects a stationary vehicle at >65mph speed? Can it also detect a pole/tree whose width is much less than a typical vehicle and auto-brake? What about the scenario where the collision is not head-on but is diagonal, will the car detect and apply brake?
      In this scenario, I guess the Boron steel doesn't have much advantage, will XC90 be same as any other car with crash-avoidance tech?

      In the flip case of XC90 being stationary and a vehicle traveling at >65mph and ramming in to XC90, I guess there is no chance of survival regardless of Boron steel and crash-avoidance systems.

      Scenario 2: Running into moving car.
      Traveling at 65mph and hitting something going at 40-60mph. Again the crash avoidance system should kick-in in frontal crash scenario. In the scenario of a side-ways or rear collision, I am assuming the Boron cage of XC90 will provide better protection than other cars.

      Scenario 3: Adaptive Cruise Control vs collision-avoidance tech
      Does the Adaptive cruise feature enhance safety either in city or freeway? I believe the collision-avoidance tech should kick-in when the driver loses attention and fails to apply brake when the vehicle in front slows down suddenly or when a vehicle cuts into the lane, Am I missing anything here?


      At what speed does Volvo test in their Safety Center?

      Do they test at the same 35-45mph as IIHS or do they try to replicate freeway conditions? Is there any data on the max speed the XC90 can withstand before inflicting serious injuries to occupants.

      Thanks!
      V40 hit at 65-100 MPH by an SUV....Everyone walked away with minor injuries....Volvo's use reinforced boron steel. You never have to worry about safety.

    26. #24
      Junior Member PhatboyC's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by mtuhoop24 View Post
      I had the system kick in on the highway yesterday. I was traveling about 70 mph with the pilot assist engaged. A car cut in front of me - the yellow light flashed (the reflection on the windshield) then quickly went to red, then solid red with beeping. My seat belt tightened up and I slowed down to about 45 mph very quickly..........frankly it scared me.......but I was safe. My daughter was in the back seat and she noticed that we slowed down but it really didn't bother her.

      Glad I had the Volvo - worked great.........
      The effective front seat belt pretensioners are rightfully praised in this thread. My concern is they are mentioned in the same line of family safety. The manual states only the front seats are equipment with electronic pretensioners were the back only has standard pretensioners. If this is a cost issue I would of gladly pay the option to have electronic pretensioners in the back were my kids sits.
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    27. #25
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      Quote Originally Posted by PhatboyC View Post
      The effective front seat belt pretensioners are rightfully praised in this thread. My concern is they are mentioned in the same line of family safety. The manual states only the front seats are equipment with electronic pretensioners were the back only has standard pretensioners. If this is a cost issue I would of gladly pay the option to have electronic pretensioners in the back were my kids sits.
      +1,000. I completely and totally agree.

    28. #26
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      Quote Originally Posted by 8675 309 View Post
      +1,000. I completely and totally agree.
      Are electric pre-tensioners compatible with child safety seats? The ratcheting when you extend the belt all the way in the second row is crucial installing a car seat correctly using the seat belt. I suspect that's why the mechanism is different.

    29. #27
      Global Moderator GrecianVolvo's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by DanInMN View Post
      Are electric pre-tensioners compatible with child safety seats? The ratcheting when you extend the belt all the way in the second row is crucial installing a car seat correctly using the seat belt. I suspect that's why the mechanism is different.
      Exactly.
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    30. #28
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      Quote Originally Posted by phillipu View Post
      Hitting another vehicle moving in the same direction at you but slower yields an impact that is the net speed difference while hitting one oncoming is additive. So if you rear end someone going 40mph when you're going 60mph would be similar to hitting something stationary at 20mph. Those same two cars at those speeds hitting each other head on would be the same as hitting a stationary object at 100mph.
      I have to respectfully say this is incorrect. While it may seem counter intuitive, two 4,000 lb cars hitting head on at 50 mph is the equivalent of hitting a 4,000 lb stationary object at 50 mph. Newton's Law states Force = mass x acceleration. Each of the two cars, similar to the stationary object, exerts a force equivalent to each vehicles force, thus stopping the vehicle. In the case of a head-on collision, the force of each car cancels out the other, resulting in both stopping.

      Unbalance the mass associated with the two vehicles (semi vs. a 2-door) and then you lose balance in the mass, resulting in high forces inflicted on the 2-door and lower on the semi.

    31. #29
      The force experienced by two vehicles in a collision is the SAME for each vehicle no matter what the circumstance.
      It's the acceleration that is different, if the masses are different in the case of the 2-door and the semi.
      Acceleration is what leads to deformation and damage during an accident.
      A handy reference for Newton's Las of Motion equations. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momentum
      In the case of the 60-40 rear impact, both vehicles experience the same force in different directions.-Dick
      BTW the reason that a 50mph collision is the same as hitting a stationary immovable object (both masses being equal) is that the acceleration is the SAME. -Dick
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    32. #30
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      Thanks for the clarification. I also just read an article on a MythBusters episode that explained this for me.

    33. #31
      Quote Originally Posted by budrichard View Post
      The force experienced by two vehicles in a collision is the SAME for each vehicle no matter what the circumstance.
      It's the acceleration that is different, if the masses are different in the case of the 2-door and the semi.
      You're correct of course, but the force experienced by passengers will be different depending on the mass of the vehicles. Because of course with force equal, and mass unequal, the acceleration is as well. I think a lot of people intuitively think of this as the "force experienced by the vehicle", even though that's not really the case.

    34. #32
      Junior Member PhatboyC's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by DanInMN View Post
      Are electric pre-tensioners compatible with child safety seats? The ratcheting when you extend the belt all the way in the second row is crucial installing a car seat correctly using the seat belt. I suspect that's why the mechanism is different.
      The ratcheting is activated once you fully extend the seat belt so it lock into place. I'm sure the smart minds at Volvo could of merge the two technologies. In fact this is one of the things that I was disappointed with Volvo. The ratcheting steps I find are to long apart to actually have the car seats extremely tight. If you add electric pre-tensioners then this slack would be eliminated before a collision.
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    35. #33
      Global Moderator GrecianVolvo's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by random1 View Post
      You're correct of course, but the force experienced by passengers will be different depending on the mass of the vehicles. Because of course with force equal, and mass unequal, the acceleration is as well. I think a lot of people intuitively think of this as the "force experienced by the vehicle", even though that's not really the case.
      Plus, the forces experienced by passengers differs among cars not only because of size but also because of how these cars are constructed with that particular scenario in mind; one priority that Volvo places, when designing and building its cars, is how to channel a portion of the energy away from the seats and around the cabin thus reducing the chance for severe injuries due to sudden deceleration...
      2001 Volvo V70 T5 M SR, Classic Red/Graphite Lthr, TME Stage II ECU, 3" Downpipe w/ Cat-back exhaust from MTE, Volvo Roadholding & Lowering Kit w/ Nivomats, 17" PEGASUS, Rear Spoiler, Dolby Surround Sound
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    36. #34
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      Quote Originally Posted by gunshow View Post
      At the dealer level, we get pics of wrecked Volvo's quite often.

      I have seen a chevy 1500 hit a 2008 XC90 head on (in Kentucky I believe) and the lady in the XC90 only had a shattered ankle from slamming on the brake pedal upon impact. The drunk driver in the truck was ejected.
      2016 Dodge Ram 1500 drunk driver vs 2016 XC90, not so pretty outcome in this story:

      http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthr...rica-Hampstead
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    37. #35
      Quote Originally Posted by PhatboyC View Post
      2016 Dodge Ram 1500 drunk driver vs 2016 XC90, not so pretty outcome in this story:

      http://forums.swedespeed.com/showthr...rica-Hampstead
      The cabin interior of the XC90 has not been compromised.
      The fact that the XC90 was driven back 50 yds shows the relative sppeds of the two vehicles.

      As to the "forces experienced by the passengers", the reason that 'Crash Testing' is conducted is that it is impossible to simply think about what happens to pasengers inside a vehicle in crash. You can surmise all you want but you can't do it. You also can't calculate the myriad combination of forces that results in materials, so you 'Crash Test'.
      Volvo crash tests to thier own standards, I suspect some manufacturers 'game' the NHTSA Testing but really even if they 'game' the Testing, the vehicle comes out safer.-Richard
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