07 V50 M66 AWD in KC
Username
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    Results 1 to 4 of 4
    1. #1
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2014
      Location
      Valley Of VA
      Posts
      151

      07 V50 M66 AWD in KC

      Anybody know anything about this one?

      http://www.rapautomotive.com/Invento...il?id=RP332067

      Been looking for a replacement for my V70 AWD for a year now. Price looks good on this, and dealer claims to have oil change records for at least part of its life, so maybe the PCV still flows. No info on timing belt.

      Is the glove test a reliable enough indicator of PCV effectiveness? That and a good look at the undercarriage are on the pre-purchase plan. Possibly even a PPI; can anyone recommend an inspector in KC?

      tia, 686Sport
      2004 V70 2.5T awd 16T / 2011 535i / 2008 Bandit 1250SA / 2000 Tacoma TRD

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. #2
      Nice find. The price is pretty good, in my opinion, for the mileage. Work the timing belt angle if you can, if negotiated well it can take a few hundred of the price as well. Glove test is a great starting point to get a baseline of what you're going to be working with, but at 100K it might be time to think about replacing it simply for good measure, maybe even when doing the timing belt and water pump. As for the chassis it rides great with new bushings, endlinks, and a stiffer rear sway. Take it for a spin, let us know what you think.

    4. #3
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2014
      Location
      Valley Of VA
      Posts
      151
      A fellow SSer in KC has tried the car and pronounced it good - except for the timing belt. He has conditionally offered to help me replace said belt in his garage. There is a method here: he wants to buy my V70awd, which I will deliver. Best of all, if either end of the deal doesn't work out, I can continue on my trip to the Rockies in my V70. All good.

      Anyway, I've done the belt on the V70 and he's done the one on his C70 HPT, so how much difference is there in doing the timing belt on a P1 T5? For reference, I did not lock down the cams when doing mine. Neither one moved much and it was easy to get it all indexed on reassembly. The car has run much better after the change. If I keep the speed down on trips [which is hard!] I can get 30+mpg. Hardest part of the job was getting the crank pulley loose.

      I replaced tensioner but not water pump or cam seals on my V70. Any reason to do the extra work if PCV seems good and there's no weepage?

      All advice and links welcomed. tia,
      686Sport
      2004 V70 2.5T awd 16T / 2011 535i / 2008 Bandit 1250SA / 2000 Tacoma TRD

    5. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    6. #4
      The timing belt change on the P1 isn't terrible, in fact there are some helpful YouTube how to videos if you want the added confidence. Since you've done it before on a T5 you already know what you're getting yourself into. There's a bit less room to work in the engine bay, but certainly do able. Once you remove the plastic timing cover inspect to see if the inside is covered in oil being slung from the cams, if you dont find any oil youre probably fine. You'll have to undo the passenger side motor mount and use a block of wood and a floorjack to leverage the engine up a few inches to get decent access to the lower bits. The water pump is simply a preventative maintenance item and with parts suppliers selling the timing belt, tensioner, water pump and serpentine belts for $200 when just the timing belt and tensioner are $131, the better question is why wouldn't you since you're in there working anyways. As for the PCV, unless you're experiencing performance related issues, for instance a slight whistle from the engine or sputtering during idle after warmed up, it's probably not necessary. But again anything over 100K will have oil build up and residue from previous use, so it couldn't hurt to have that extra peace of mind moving forward with the car. Either way, good luck and go with your gut about the car. Happy wrenching.

    7. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements