View Full Version : Remote engine oil filter and cooler?



dcthompson
10-20-2013, 10:38 PM
I am contemplating installing a remote engine oil filter and thermostatically controlled oil cooler (oil to air heat exchanger) on a B20 engine in a 220. I see several advantages to this modification: (1) increased oil capacity, (2) oil filter re-located away from the hot exhaust manifold, and (3) cooler return flow. The disadvantage, of course, is the increased risk of failure due to a hose rupture.

Does anyone have experience with this modification? A reputable manufacturer? A standard kit, complete with appropriate braided lines?

Thoughts and recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Dan

T5 for Life
10-21-2013, 10:16 AM
I ran a Summit Racing remote oil filter on my 240. It made oil changes much easier, but that was because I had a high rise header and a giant turbo in the way of the stock filter/cooler sandwich plate.

Do you race the motor or drive it in situations were extra cooling and capacity would be beneficial. I know cooler oil is always better, but if it's a bum around daily driver, it may not be worth it. However, the kits really aren't that expensive, and will work much better than that rather scary stock donut-like setup Volvo used on the B18s.

My only consideration would be your stock oil pressure, as there may be a bit of a drop due to the extra plumbing.

dcthompson
10-21-2013, 10:31 AM
No, not for racing--I'm just entering my second childhood, and feel the need for a boy racer. The nice thing about getting old is that I can finally afford the toys that I wanted so badly way back when.

My plan is to build (or have Phil S. build) a B20 bored to 2.1, with Webers, cam, ported head, 10.5:1 compression, and anything else that will help me gain torque and hp without resorting to boosting. In the end the remote oil filter and cooler probably aren't necessary, but they would sure look cool.

Which brings up another question--what (pointless electronic) distributor do folks favor these days? I have heard negative comments about the 123 unit. Is there a good one available, or should I stick with stock?

Dan

gdill2
10-21-2013, 10:49 AM
I am contemplating installing a remote engine oil filter and thermostatically controlled oil cooler (oil to air heat exchanger) on a B20 engine in a 220. I see several advantages to this modification: (1) increased oil capacity, (2) oil filter re-located away from the hot exhaust manifold, and (3) cooler return flow. The disadvantage, of course, is the increased risk of failure due to a hose rupture.

Does anyone have experience with this modification? A reputable manufacturer? A standard kit, complete with appropriate braided lines?

Thoughts and recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Dan



No, not for racing--I'm just entering my second childhood, and feel the need for a boy racer. The nice thing about getting old is that I can finally afford the toys that I wanted so badly way back when.

My plan is to build (or have Phil S. build) a B20 bored to 2.1, with Webers, cam, ported head, 10.5:1 compression, and anything else that will help me gain torque and hp without resorting to boosting. In the end the remote oil filter and cooler probably aren't necessary, but they would sure look cool.

Which brings up another question--what (pointless electronic) distributor do folks favor these days? I have heard negative comments about the 123 unit. Is there a good one available, or should I stick with stock?

Dan

If Singher builds your B20 all questions will be answered by him during the build.

Your Amazon wagon will need other improvements to take advantage of the hot engine including M41/OD and/or diff gears swap.

Envision your final product then work in that direction.

The 123 dizzy is expensive and too high-tech for a simple B20 setup. It works best with a user-controlled computer ignition system.

The Bosch distributor without vacuum retard will be just fine complimented by a Bosch Blue Coil (no ballast needed), electronic ignition (Petronix?), new ignition wires and NGK spark plugs of correct application.

Other upgrades include a re-worked fuse block/wiring, push-button starter, turn signal flasher, etc.

George Dill

dcthompson
10-21-2013, 11:24 AM
George:

I have already got a line on an M41 with J-type overdrive, an 1800ES rear axle, and front and rear 1800 ES brakes. Everything else is underway, with the exception of the 220 itself! I have found several candidate vehicles, but am waiting for a decent 68 body.

By turn-signal flasher do you mean implementing the headlight flasher function?

Dan

T5 for Life
10-21-2013, 11:49 AM
Sounds like a good build you have planned, Dan. I will say the remote filter turned the oil changes on my 245 into a 5 minute task. I mounted it on the front of the passenger side frame, right next to the lower radiator hose. Couldn't be easier. Not sure where you'd mount your oil cooler though, as you'll want it someplace that gets airflow.

dcthompson
10-21-2013, 12:17 PM
Tony:

Yeah, after almost 50 years of getting burned by a hot exhaust I'm finally getting smart.

I'm puzzling over where to put the oil cooler. I certainly don't want to impede air flow to the radiator, and mounting it below will make it vulnerable. Does anyone have any suggestions? Most oil coolers appear to be around 10" x 14".

Dan

T5 for Life
10-21-2013, 12:46 PM
The stock 240 turbo oil cooler was off the left (driver's side) of the radiator, mounted to the support brace that went across the car (headlights/grill/radiator mounted to it). There was a small opening to allow some of the air from the grill to pass over the oil cooler, but it wasn't too big. You don't need that much airflow going over it.

I wouldn't mount it underneath. Any way you can mount it off the side, and maybe cut a small opening in something to allow air to pass over it?

Phil Singher
10-21-2013, 07:01 PM
I don't know of any pre-made oil cooler kits. I rigged one up for a competition Amazon some years back using aeroquip hose and AN fittings, because that car was going to see sustained high revs (like 15 minutes at a time near the redline). I don't know that I'd want such a setup on a regular driver. It's bulky if you use hose of sufficient diameter to not restrict the oil flow.

You can see it about 2/3 of the way down THIS PAGE (http://www.applefarmerracing.com/car.html).

T5 for Life
10-22-2013, 10:11 AM
Keep in mind the remote oil filter kit can be separate from the oil cooler. Typically you'd install the cooler sandwich plate between the filter and the block, or between the remote filter mount and the oil filter, so how you plumb it is up to you. But you can definitely do one and not the other. If the remote oil filter is more important, that would be much cheaper than doing a remote filter/oil cooler combination.

T5 for Life
10-22-2013, 10:57 PM
Oddly enough, saw this on ebay tonight. Has everything but the hoses.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Parts-Master-291-Oil-Cooler-Mounting-Kit-/171148342912?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&fits=Make%3AVolvo|Model%3A122&hash=item27d93c7680&vxp=mtr

jrhendo
06-20-2014, 05:21 PM
I can't talk about Amazons because mine is pretty standard. However on my marathon rally 144 I fitted a remote oil filter and cooler setup. I used AN10 hoses from the original filter point on the block (via an adapter plate) to a thermostatically controlled remote filter housing - Greddy brand. I mounted this behind the RHS headlight bucket. Just enough clearance to change bulbs. Mounted high enough so I could use Ryco Z9 filters (here in Australia, common on Fords etc) rather than Volvo ones. They have the same return flap as the Volvo filter but nearly twice the capacity and half the price. Also much more common to get.

I then ran AN10 hoses through the normal air flow hole to a cooler mounted as low as I could, about 2" in front of the radiator. I put 2 electric fans in front of the lot, controlled by a thermoswitch in the radiator. The fans in front of everything, rather than immediately in front of the radiator have at least 2 advantages: they cool the oil cooler as well as the radiator and they make radiator changes far quicker. I've got another 140 with the fan mounted on the radiator and it seems to heat up at idle a lot quicker than the first setup.

Also, I don't agree with earlier comments about the 123 distributor. I've got the 123-Tune version and I got it because we were having problems getting the low down power to work with modern fuels and my engine build. I've got it set with about 12BTDC at idle rising to a max of 32 at 3500rpm. It's switchable to a different curve for bad fuel and very easy to program the curve with a laptop, either by the seat of your pants or on a dyno. For about $500 you get a brand new dizzy that's totally programmable. I reckon that's well worth having. It was completely reliable over 15000kms of rallying conditions including bad dirt surfaces across Australia to fast tarmac in Europe.