View Full Version : Certified by Volvo sales -- February 2020



GrecianVolvo
03-08-2020, 06:38 PM
Certified by Volvo sales, in the U.S., posted another strong result in the month of February; 2,370 Certified Volvos were sold and delivered which was a 25.6% lift vs February 2019's 1,887 sales.

YTD, Certified by Volvo sales total has risen to 4,404 which is a 19.1% lift vs same period in 2019 (3,697 sales).

Top selling models, in February, were:

XC90 820 sales or 34.58%
XC60 641 sales or 27.04%
S60 343 sales or 14.47%
S90 302 sales or 12.74%
XC40 84 sales or 3.54%
XC70 50 sales or 2.11%
V90CC 42 sales or 1.77%
V60 39 sales or 1.64%
V60CC 35 sales or 1.48%
V90 11 sales or 0.46%

The Certified by Volvo model offers a standard warranty of 5 yrs/unlimited mileage (starting from the original in-service date) with $0 deductible and can be extended 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 yrs / unlimited miles or up to 100,000 miles.

All Certified Volvos also receive a 1-yr complimentary Volvo On Call subscription and undergo a thorough 175+ point inspection.

MyVolvoS60
03-08-2020, 07:34 PM
So maybe there should be clarification here... Tech has stated that Volvo's Corporate Mandate is to not sell CPO's until the door latch issue has been resolved?

GrecianVolvo
03-09-2020, 09:20 AM
So maybe there should be clarification here... Tech has stated that Volvo's Corporate Mandate is to not sell CPO's until the door latch issue has been resolved?

Correct. Not all S60s fall under the recall notice and, in that mix, there are some new generation S60s, as well.

MyVolvoS60
03-09-2020, 02:06 PM
Correct. Not all S60s fall under the recall notice and, in that mix, there are some new generation S60s, as well.

So in reality, those numbers are actually "Low" since Volvo has inventory that's suppose to be on hold until after the recall. And that Volvo's positive growth could have been even more had it not been for the recall hold back.

Seems SUV's are on top again since fuel prices are lower these days.

RootDKJ
03-09-2020, 04:15 PM
Cool info! Thanks for sharing.

Veefifty T5AWD
03-10-2020, 01:12 PM
I'd still like to know how much of the CPO sales growth is due to the change in cost to dealers. Since the change to the CPO program, it costs less for a dealer to CPO a car, so they seem to be certifying more. Has this been accounted for in the numbers?

ShadowDancer
03-11-2020, 08:04 AM
I wasn't aware Volvo reports their Certified Pre-Owned Sales numbers.
The numbers do not surprise me though. In my region the number of late model Volvos on the roads has increased dramatically - notably across the entire CUV range.
Even the occasion 'odd duck' V90 or S90 shows up in a parking lot. Someone at the train station I use has the new V90 and it's always a treat to look at.

Be that as it may, with many of 1st cycle of SPA vehicles exiting their lease periods, I expect CPO sales to continue to have strong growth.

A $65-70K XC90 was out of reach for many 3 years ago. At $35K, its price is within a much broader spectrum of buyers and incomes.

GrecianVolvo
03-11-2020, 11:01 PM
So in reality, those numbers are actually "Low" since Volvo has inventory that's suppose to be on hold until after the recall. And that Volvo's positive growth could have been even more had it not been for the recall hold back.
Yes, for sure.


Seems SUV's are on top again since fuel prices are lower these days.

Yes, plus SUVs make up for about 75% of Volvo's volume in new car sales so that cascades down to the Certified sales, as well. Sedan segment Certified sales (for most premium brands) seem to be faring better vs new car sales, for some reason.

MyVolvoS60
03-12-2020, 06:06 AM
Yes, plus SUVs make up for about 75% of Volvo's volume in new car sales so that cascades down to the Certified sales, as well. Sedan segment Certified sales (for most premium brands) seem to be faring better vs new car sales, for some reason.

The American Psyche over vehicle choice is always intriguing. During the 2008 great recession, Americans ditched their SUVs and flocked towards sedans and hybrids. Leading many manufacturers to drop SUVs all together. And when gas prices were soaring, the same held true.

Of Course, now that fuel is back to around ~$2.00, Americans are flocking back to SUVs. I wonder if the hybridization and better fuel economy will insulate SUV's from a repeat scenario of 2008 in the future.

Far as CPO vs. New, buying Brand New has always been touted as a less prudent decision. Sure, you're the only one breaking in the vehicle, but that comes at a steep price. The car will drop $1000s of dollars almost immediately. Whereas, a slightly used CPO will have already taken that hit in depreciation so the loss is less significant. Meaning a few thousand miles on the odometer can means saving $4000 or $5000.

Still, there will always be people who care less about the financial loss and drive new cars sales. For some, having the car built to their specs and taste far outweighs the allure of used. Along with a financial standing that says I like what I like and don't care about price.

ShadowDancer
03-12-2020, 08:12 AM
The American Psyche over vehicle choice is always intriguing. During the 2008 great recession, Americans ditched their SUVs and flocked towards sedans and hybrids. Leading many manufacturers to drop SUVs all together. And when gas prices were soaring, the same held true.

Of Course, now that fuel is back to around ~$2.00, Americans are flocking back to SUVs. I wonder if the hybridization and better fuel economy will insulate SUV's from a repeat scenario of 2008 in the future.
The American psyche has never changed. We're not a small call society. Our consumer automotive industry did not start with small town cars and tiny roadsters like most other countries' industries.

The US industry offering started with - "Do you want the big sedan or the bigger luxury sedan or the pick-up truck for the farm?"

This has been ingrained in our culture. The majority of the buying public does not like nor want small cars. Hatchbacks and wagons also hold little appeal. Foreign automakers continuous try to sell them here and they will go on to sell in tepid numbers, become cultish cars (Mini / BMW, Golfs, Audi Avant, CRX), or flop.

There are times when gas prices force us to downsize - but as soon as the prices normalize, we ditch the small car and go back to our roots. We probably will not see a return to 2008. Trucks and large sedans of the era barely achieved 12-18 mpg and 20-24 mpg respectively on the highway and some required premium fuel or midgrade minimum.
In 2020, even full-sized SUVs like the Navigator and Escalade can achieve highway fuel mileage numbers associated with what used to be a large car. Full sized sedans their numbers look like the economy car of 10 years ago. Both can accept 87 low grade fuel too as well.

rdr854
03-15-2020, 11:45 PM
The American psyche has never changed. We're not a small call society. Our consumer automotive industry did not start with small town cars and tiny roadsters like most other countries' industries.

The US industry offering started with - "Do you want the big sedan or the bigger luxury sedan or the pick-up truck for the farm?"

This has been ingrained in our culture. The majority of the buying public does not like nor want small cars. Hatchbacks and wagons also hold little appeal. Foreign automakers continuous try to sell them here and they will go on to sell in tepid numbers, become cultish cars (Mini / BMW, Golfs, Audi Avant, CRX), or flop.

There are times when gas prices force us to downsize - but as soon as the prices normalize, we ditch the small car and go back to our roots. We probably will not see a return to 2008. Trucks and large sedans of the era barely achieved 12-18 mpg and 20-24 mpg respectively on the highway and some required premium fuel or midgrade minimum.
In 2020, even full-sized SUVs like the Navigator and Escalade can achieve highway fuel mileage numbers associated with what used to be a large car. Full sized sedans their numbers look like the economy car of 10 years ago. Both can accept 87 low grade fuel too as well.

The new SPA Volvos require premium fuel. Additionally, other manufacturers with turbo motors or other high performance motors also require premium fuel. I believe that includes the 6.2 motor on the large GM SUVs such as the GMC Yukon Denali, Chevrolet Suburban/Tahoe, etc..

ShadowDancer
03-16-2020, 11:32 AM
The new SPA Volvos require premium fuel.

That's not 100% accurate. The Drive-E engine family has requirements that vary:
The T4 & T5 minimum spec is 87 octane.
The T6 & T8 minimum spec is 91 octane.


Additionally, other manufacturers with turbo motors or other high performance motors also require premium fuel.
High performance motors, yes.
Turbo motors, no. Not all turbo engines require use of premium fuel simply because they are turboed. For instance, Mazda's 2.5 Turbo Skyactiv family clearly list the output ratings for the fuel type the owner uses.


I believe that includes the 6.2 motor on the large GM SUVs such as the GMC Yukon Denali, Chevrolet Suburban/Tahoe, etc..
GM's big bore motor has compression and tuning that is different depending on application. Premium fuel is recommended but not a requirement.
In the Vette and other performance applications, it's generally going to need to be run with Premium or else the engine will retard timing down into the basement.
But in truck applications, the engine is being run with nearly as aggressive maps, timing, compression, fueling requirements, etc. so one can be fine using 87 for everyday use, then fill the tank with premium if they're towing, hauling, etc. to allow the computer to turn the power back up and even then the engine is actively shutting down cylinders (displacement on demand) to improve fuel economy. Something that GM simply was very poor at engineering and designing 15 year ago.

GrecianVolvo
03-16-2020, 04:49 PM
That's not 100% accurate. The Drive-E engine family has requirements that vary:
The T4 & T5 minimum spec is 87 octane.
The T6 & T8 minimum spec is 91 octane.


Let's not start with the endless fuel requirement discussion that gets us nowhere and will fill this thread with garbage. It's on your owner's manuals, for example, on the MY17 XC90 it's on pp. 443-444.

I will save you, and everyone else who wants to argue to the opposite, the time and space by quoting exactly from the owner's manual:
Octane rating
Volvo demands premium fuel (91 Octane or higher) for all T5, T6 and T8 engines.
The T4 engine will be fine with 87 Octane but Volvo recommends 91 Octane or higher (for optimal performance, so I don't know why anyone would use less than 91 Octane unless that is all they can get at that moment).

Let this be the end of the octane requirement discussion, for a Drive-E Volvo engine, please.

ShadowDancer
03-16-2020, 11:56 PM
I will save you, and everyone else who wants to argue to the opposite, the time and space by quoting exactly from the owner's manual:
Octane rating
Volvo demands premium fuel (91 Octane or higher) for all T5, T6 and T8 engines.
The T4 engine will be fine with 87 Octane but Volvo recommends 91 Octane or higher (for optimal performance, so I don't know why anyone would use less than 91 Octane unless that is all they can get at that moment).

Let this be the end of the octane requirement discussion, for a Drive-E Volvo engine, please.

There is no demand for premium fuel for T5 engines according to Volvo own information as of Jan-2020. This requirement does however exist for for T6 and T8 engines.

http://volvo.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/9746/~/fuel-requirements
Last Updated: 01/06/2020 11:10 AM

Fuel Requirements:
Volvo recommends premium, 91 unleaded octane or higher for optimum performance, but your Volvo can run on regular 87 unleaded octane without affecting engine reliability. It is safe to use fuel containing up to 10% Ethanol in your Volvo.

NOTE: If you have a Volvo with a T6 engine, your vehicle is equipped with a high performance engine and requires premium fuel, 91 unleaded octane or higher.
NOTE: If you have a T8 Volvo, your vehicle requires 91 unleaded octane or higher.

RootDKJ
03-17-2020, 06:27 AM
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200317/d7a3377ad9ed885b27fe7eb916ffedda.jpg

ShadowDancer
03-17-2020, 08:57 PM
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200317/d7a3377ad9ed885b27fe7eb916ffedda.jpg

What is the published date of this requirement?

As of Jan 2020, Volvo published this as the requirement. Specific call outs for T6 & T8, nothing for T4 & T5.
https://i.imgur.com/ZENGNCo.png

RootDKJ
03-18-2020, 08:42 AM
What is the published date of this requirement?

As of Jan 2020, Volvo published this as the requirement. Specific call outs for T6 & T8, nothing for T4 & T5.
https://i.imgur.com/ZENGNCo.png
What make/model/year are you using? What does YOUR user manual say? When I look up any 2019 or 2020 online or using the Volvo Manual app they all say T5, T6 and T8 requires 91 octane.

GrecianVolvo
03-18-2020, 02:11 PM
There is no demand for premium fuel for T5 engines according to Volvo own information as of Jan-2020. This requirement does however exist for for T6 and T8 engines.

http://volvo.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/9746/~/fuel-requirements
Last Updated: 01/06/2020 11:10 AM

I will let the team, there, know since this is not accurate; all T5, T6 and T8 engines require a minimum of 91 octane or higher. I will also refer you to any MY20 owner's manual for the same. For example, p.432 of the MY20 XC90 owner's manual supports what I am writing here, verbatim.


Fuel Requirements:
Volvo recommends premium, 91 unleaded octane or higher for optimum performance, but your Volvo can run on regular 87 unleaded octane without affecting engine reliability. It is safe to use fuel containing up to 10% Ethanol in your Volvo.
Nobody has claimed that the cars will not run on less than 91 octane gasoline. On the same note, if you drink water from a questionable source of purity (i.e. stream, puddle, etc) will you shut down vs drinking spring water out of a bottle? No. Is there a chance that your system will react less favorably? Chances are, yes, it will.

To end this discussion that can go on forever, you own a SPA Volvo, a car that requires Premium fuel. Arguing about using a lesser grade is neither fruitful nor will it change the fact that these engines have been designed, manufactured and programmed to run on premium fuel (91 octane or higher).


NOTE: If you have a Volvo with a T6 engine, your vehicle is equipped with a high performance engine and requires premium fuel, 91 unleaded octane or higher.
NOTE: If you have a T8 Volvo, your vehicle requires 91 unleaded octane or higher.

T5 is also in this group.

ShadowDancer
03-19-2020, 10:28 AM
What make/model/year are you using? What does YOUR user manual say? When I look up any 2019 or 2020 online or using the Volvo Manual app they all say T5, T6 and T8 requires 91 octane.

This is directly from the Volvo website. Why would the model matter?
The engine is the engine. The T5 makes the same stated power in the XC90 as it does in the XC40, S60, & XC60.

Manuals are often written, edited, locked and sent to print months ahead of the vehicle they're released with. If there was an engineering or spec update, I can see why it would reach the website and be updated before the print copy. It's the difference between a 10 cent keystroke or millions of dollars in physical inventory print changes.

RootDKJ
03-19-2020, 10:43 AM
A Pre-2016 T5 is not the same as a 2020 T5. Feel free to use 87 octane in your T5 and please report back your experience in a few years. Grecian already said hes notified people to make a correction to the website.

MyVolvoS60
03-19-2020, 05:31 PM
This is directly from the Volvo website. Why would the model matter?
The engine is the engine. The T5 makes the same stated power in the XC90 as it does in the XC40, S60, & XC60.

Manuals are often written, edited, locked and sent to print months ahead of the vehicle they're released with. If there was an engineering or spec update, I can see why it would reach the website and be updated before the print copy. It's the difference between a 10 cent keystroke or millions of dollars in physical inventory print changes.

Volvo use to permit 87 in turbo engines. My 15.5 manual states 87 is acceptable. I tried it out ONCE and it felt sluggish. Went back premium and haven't looked back. I believe the 2019s started calling for 91 without exception. Correct me on the year if I am wrong. None the less, 87 is no longer recommended for use in Volvos.

GrecianVolvo
03-20-2020, 01:40 PM
Volvo use to permit 87 in turbo engines. My 15.5 manual states 87 is acceptable. I tried it out ONCE and it felt sluggish. Went back premium and haven't looked back. I believe the 2019s started calling for 91 without exception. Correct me on the year if I am wrong. None the less, 87 is no longer recommended for use in Volvos.

Started with MY16s and newer, as long as they have the high performance 4-cyl engines (B4204T9 and B4204T10).