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    1. #316
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      More activity.

      The parts from Speedway arrived on Monday. My thoughts about using a 3/4" spherical bearing in a rod end mount (heim joint) located where the lower column mounting strap is located as the support bearing for the output shaft went into the garbage can. The head of the heim joint is too large in diameter and mounting it on the side of the steering column bracket would offset the shaft to the right compared to where it is normally located. With the lower U joints this might have been OK; but, it also looked like the mounting stud for the bearing was so large that it appeared that I was going to have a potential interference problem with the brake pedal.

      My new plan is to repurpose the existing lower column bracket and the rubber cushion that fits inside it. To this end, I had a bushing made up to fit the 3/4" output shaft. The outside diameter of the bushing is exactly the same size as the Volvo steering column so it fits securely in the rubber cushion. It has a collar on each end to prevent it from moving back and forth inside the rubber cushion. The Volvo steering column is held in position in the lower mount by a little key welded onto the bracket which fits into a slot on the column. I had a keyway machined into the bushing to accommodate this key and secure the bushing from rotating on the shaft. I was originally thinking about having the bushing made from brass; but, after discussing the item with the machinist he recommended nylatron. Nylatron is a nylon compound with molybdenum disulfide powder embedded in it. It looks a bit like Delrin; but, it is a different material. This is the bushing:

      bushing.jpg

      and this is the bushing installed on the column bracket:

      bushing mocked up.jpg

      In this case the column clamp is the wrong clamp; but, I just grabbed it because it was convenient. This happens to be the top clamp which has the pin welded in it. The lower clamp lacks the pin because it has the locating key welded on the bracket. So, for reference the top and bottom clamps are different, despite what the parts manual implies.

      I also have the collar to joint the Versa steering column to the upper portion of the Volvo column back from the machinist. The collar is the tube second from the left in the photo and slips over the outside of the Versa column and Volvo column to join them. The collar is a nudge over 3.5" long and wall thickness is approximately 0.125". The machinist fabricated it with pretty tight tolerances so there is no slop and wiggling in the column when joined. In fact the fit is tight enough that it is necessary to lubricate the parts to get them together and especially get them apart.

      adapter and bushing.jpg

      The tube on the left with the flange is the lower / inside portion of the Versa steering column. Below is the complete Versa steering column / tube after it has been cut free from its brackets.

      Versa column.jpg

      The lower / inner portion of the column with the flange is what we want and has to be separated from the top collapsing section. On the left end of the tube is the Versa steering shaft bearing. I hacksawed the bearing off so I could get a drift into the tube and pound out the lower section. The top edge of the lower tube does get a bit messed up by this; but, that is not particularly critical in part because I am likely going to trim the length a bit when installed.

      This is the steering column mount / pedal box from the Volvo. I have taken my first approximation at cutting out the lower web to accommodate the Versa EPS drive. The hole above the missing web will have to be filled in with a welded in reinforcing plate to prevent the upper portion of the bracket from flexing. This will create a minor problem because that hole is used by the flex duct for the outer defrost nozzle. At the lower right, midway between the two mounting studs for the column clamp you will see the little key welded to the bracket which fits into the bushing.

      bracket.jpg
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 06-19-2019 at 07:12 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

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    3. #317
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      Don't know if you've seen this on turbobricks or not:
      http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=341174
      And this:
      https://www.epowersteering.com/index.html
      Steve
      Last edited by 66Wildcat; 06-23-2019 at 12:11 PM.

    4. #318
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      I had seen the TurboBricks thread. Clearly using a custom bracket to mount the EPS unit on the car. What is interesting to me is the details of the P 1800 E mounting bracket. All of the EPS units that I have seen (which is definitely not all of them) are set up for use on steering columns which are up- down adjustable. They typically are suspended by largish bolts through two pivots hanging from a platform. In the early photos of the Versa column that I posted, you can see that platform which would in turn hang from the bottom of the dash structure. It looks like the custom bracket for the 1800 just replaces that platform because they are using the original suspension points on the EPS unit. The bracket they have fabricated will certainly do an excellent job of managing the torque load generated by the EPS unit. The only thing that leaves me a little queasy is that it looks like the EPS is still free to pivot around those bolts. In the OEM applications there are actually bushing on those bolts which facilitates the EPS pivoting. The 1800 application has clearly eliminated those pivot bushings and if you apply enough torque to the mounting bolts, I suppose that friction would greatly restrict the ability to pivot. My personal preference would be to have some bracket which prevents the EPS from pivoting which I don't see any evidence of. They are using u joint on the output of the EPS which would accommodate angular displacement of the shaft associated with the EPS pivoting; however, in the photos, the whole top part of the 1800 steering column appears to be floating with the sole attachment point being the coupling to the EPS column. Not being familiar with the 1800, perhaps there is a support for the column farther up which would restrict movement of the upper column. If not, I am really hating the way that they have mounted the upper portion of the column. I am also a little queasy about the mechanical connection between the Volvo column and the EPS column (the part that looks like its wrapped in tape with a big mother bolt).

      The 1800 steering column mounting is significantly different than in the 140. The 140 steering column bracket is triple duty - pedal box + steering column mount + dash support. Clearly the 1800 looks like it is just a steering column support. It would be possible to separate the pedal portion of the 140 bracket and throw away the upper portion of the bracket. You could then fabricate a completely new bracket very much like the 1800 bracket which would utilize the existing mounting holes on the bottom of the 140 cowl. This bracket would have to be further modified to provide support to the bottom of the dash which is the third function of the 140 bracket.

      This is definitely not a technology project. It is more of a hardware design / mounting details / can I get it to fit project. That 1800 style bracket is certainly an option for the 140. However, I am not sure that it is easier than what I am trying.

      As to the second link, there are now a number of vendors offering EPS retrofit parts and kits. That site is nice because they offer a large collection of the parts needed to make it work - if you want to use the Saturn EPS unit. In particular they offer this:

      https://www.epowersteering.com/purch...racket-style-a

      It looks a bit big; but, you might be able to cut out the bottom portion of the Volvo bracket and with some modification weld this to the Volvo bracket. Could make installation easier - if you want to use the Saturn EPS which I don't. You still have to deal with the details of how you attach the upper part of the Volvo steering column. If you are happy with the idea of the Saturn EPS unit, then I would definitely give these guys a go for sourcing parts.

      When I was getting frustrated with figuring out the upper column details, I had briefly considered completely ditching the complete upper Volvo column parts and using the Versa top end complete with its tilt mechanism, ignition key lock, turn signal / headlight / wiper switch assembly and steering wheel (avec air bag). The dimensions actually looked like they would make a close fit. Would definitely not look Volvo. Also, the reality check was that retaining the complete upper portion of the Versa steering pretty much required retaining the vertical positioning of the Versa EPS motor on its bracket and I am pretty confident that there was absolutely no room below the 140s cowl for that to happen. The need to clock the Versa EPS motor horizontally to fit on the Volvo also pretty much eliminates the ability to use the Versa's two pivot point suspension mounts as attachments to the Volvo bracket.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 06-23-2019 at 01:56 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

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    6. #319
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      Time to do a test fit on the car to identify any obvious interference problems. This required removal of the existing column and bracket on the car which turned out to be a bigger deal than I had anticipated. When I put the car back together 5 yrs ago, I loomed and tucked all the wiring up so that it would be secure which included running wiring through the holes in the bracket. In order to get the bracket out I had to cut open the looms and extract all the wires going through bracket. The reality is to get the bracket out with the dashboard installed, the instrument cluster also has to come out to make room to free the bracket. Anyway, fine mess at the end of all this:

      Brackets.jpg

      Here is a comparison of the original bracket on the left and the modified donor bracket on the right that I got from apico500.

      Dash.jpg

      The donor is clearly from a different model year than the 1971 bracket. It uses captive bolts in the top holes and no captive nuts on the bottom holes compared to the '71 bracket; but, the important thing is all the dimensions are the same. The steel plate next to the bracket is the reenforcement to be welded in to fill in the hole on the right side of the bracket to replace the cut web.

      Bracket with the EPS mounted and the pedals installed to check for interference between the EPS and the range of pedal movement.

      Mock-up on bracket.jpg

      Bracket temporarily installed back in car with the EPS mounted on it to check for interference. No problems identified. The bracket needs to go back in 'bare' and then install the column / EPS unit. Tip, the EPS is quite heavy so having a separate set of hands to hold things while bolting things up is handy.

      EPS test fit.jpg

      Valence back in place. EPS nicely hidden by valence so definitely no problems with the EPS interfering with your toes.

      Valence installed.jpg
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 06-25-2019 at 11:35 AM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    7. #320
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      Looking good!!!

    8. #321
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      Spent the morning measuring up a circular bracket to fit around the base of the Versa column where the three bolts attach the column to the EPS unit. The purpose of the bracket is to restrain the EPS from rotating when it applies steering torque. I don't want to rely on the clamp on the upper column to do this. Initial plan was that this circular bracket would have a long tab on it which would be welded to the side of the Volvo bracket. I cut up a prototype of the bracket in some 1/4" Baltic Birch plywood that I had handy and mocked it up on the column. After eyeballing this, I came to the conclusion that if I welded the torque bracket to the column bracket and installed the steering column bracket in the car, the torque bracket was going to prevent me from installing the EPS drive once the top part of the column and steering shafts are all welded together. The column has to go into the car attached to the EPS unit and ten lifted into place on the bracket. With the column attached to the EPS unit there is insufficient room to the firewall to allow the EPS plus attached column to be threaded through a fixed circular bracket. I think the easy solution to this is to make the circular torque bracket separate which then bolts to the side of the steering column bracket. This make fabrication of the torque bracket a little more fussy; but, certainly doable. It also make assembly more of a hassle because you are now squeezing your hands into tight spots to tighten nuts and bolts.

      The other option is to cut a large slot in the circular torque bracket to allow the column to be inserted into the torque bracket from the bottom. I am iffy about this because the size of the slot looks like it will compromise the bolting surface for two of the three bolts that attach the bracket to the EPS unit. I plan to take the drawing for the bracket over to a metal fabricator this afternoon to get the bracket cut out of some mild steel. If the cost is not significant I will get them to cut two brackets and I may try cutting a slot in one to see if the slot idea is doable.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    9. #322
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      More activity. At this point, I think I have completed all of the required mechanical modifications.

      This is the remains of the top end of the Volvo steering shaft which couples to the input of the Versa EPS.

      Volvo shaft.jpg

      I left the lower part of the Versa EPS input shaft 'as is' and cut the Volvo shaft so that it projects about 85-86 mm beyond the face of the bearing on the end of the Volvo steering tube when attached to the Versa shaft. That is the approximate projection that I measured on the original Volvo tube and shaft assembly. We decided not to weld the Volvo shaft to the Versa shaft, in part because I was unsure how shaft heating might affect the torque sensor which is integral to the Versa shaft. I think the machinist was a little iffy about welding because of material compatibility between the apparently mild steel of the Volvo shaft and the unknown stuff of the Versa shaft (almost looks stainless). Instead, the machinist sectioned the original Versa upper sliding shaft section to get the outer splines and welded this to the Volvo shaft. He installed a couple of set screws in this section which line up in the middle of the land in the Versa input shaft. That land on the Versa shaft is probably 15 mm long so in some bizarre circumstance, if the set screws don't hold the Volvo shaft could move back about 7 - 8 mm before being captured by the edge of the land. To reduce this risk, I plan to use some Loctite red on the splines.

      The photo shows the remains of the top part of the Versa shaft above the Volvo shaft. The splined section of the Versa shaft was cut from this right about where the end of the Versa shaft lines up with the splined section that has been welded on to the Volvo shaft. This gives a splined coupling about 40 - 50 mm long which should result in secure coupling to the Versa shaft.

      In order to remove the Volvo steering shaft from the Volvo steering tube, I had to drill out the retainers that hold the collar for the column lock. To reattach the collar, I had the machinist tack weld the collar back on to the shaft in its original location.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    10. #323
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      This is the little stub of 3/4" shaft on the output of the EPS. It projects just slightly through the firewall and attaches to the collapsible section of the Versa shaft which couples to the steering box. The Versa shaft is swapped 180 deg relative to its normal configuration. This required a double D to be machined on to the end of the stub to accept the Versa shaft.

      Output stub.jpg

      The 17mm Woodward coupling which fits on the EPS output had set screws that, based upon where the land is on the Versa EPS output, were too close to the end of the coupling. It didn't allow the coupling to completely engage with the EPS output shaft. Two new set screws were installed in the coupling about 16 mm from the end of the coupling. In this close-up you can clearly see the original set screw holes and the two new set screws and that the coupling fits all the way on to the Versa shaft.

      Set screws.jpg
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 07-10-2019 at 09:46 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    11. #324
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      This is the 'final piece' in the assembly, the connection to the steering box input shaft.

      Output shaft.jpg

      On the right is the Volvo OEM fitting that fits on the steering box shaft. Next to it is the adapter that bolts directly to that fitting. The adapter is just a stub that fits into the 16.7 mm splined fitting on the Versa collapsible shaft. The stub is not splined (just try and find a 16.7 mm fitting); but, the stub is notched for the clamp bolt which prevents rotation. A little Loctite red will provide some insurance.

      Eagle eyes will note the odd phasing of the U joints on the Versa shaft. Convention would have the end jokes aligned so that the angular acceleration that occurs across the U joints cancels. Of course this only works if the angular offsets in both joints are the same. The phasing in the Versa shaft looks to be 45 deg. The collapsible section of the Versa shaft is captured so its not like the shaft came apart and I inserted it incorrectly. It was assembled that way at the factory - perhaps a manufacturing error? As planned, the angular offsets in the shaft should be zero or small so the phasing should not be a problem.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    12. #325
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      I had a bracket fabricated to act as a support to handle the torque reaction of the EPS drive.

      EPS bracket final.JPG

      I welded a piece of angle on to the tab on the bracket which in turn is bolted to the side of the Volvo bracket. Two reasons for doing it this way rather than just welding the bracket directly to the side of the Volvo bracket. First, with the bracket welded in place there is insufficient room between the bracket and the firewall to allow the upper steering tube to be threaded through the hole in the bracket. You could 'fix this by chopping off the lower half of the bracket allowing you to lift the column in to place; but, you would lose the lower locating bolt. The second is that the steering column does not run parallel to the Volvo bracket. Its at a slight angle. Using the separate piece of angle allowed me to bend the angle in the vice to make sure that the center line of the upper tube was centered between the two hanger bolt holes on the back end of the Volvo bracket.

      I will admit that the welded on angle does make it look a bit ' farmyard engineered'.

      Torque bracket.jpg
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 07-11-2019 at 09:18 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    13. #326
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      I put a couple of coats of paint on all the EPS parts (except the Versa drive), primarily for protection. I used some Eastwood Chassis black which I had around from when I did the resto work on the Volvo. The Eastwood gives a nice tough finish (for an aerosol based paint); but, it is a bit of a hassle to use because you do 2 coats of primer and you have to wait 24 hrs after each prime coat before recoating, so it ends up being a 3 day process.

      After the final paint coat had hardened up, I did a final test fit of all the parts yesterday on the Volvo bracket which included powering up the EPS unit from a battery to make sure that after all of my messing around with the EPS unit it still worked. No point in installing a dead unit and trying to diagnose the problem once it is installed. Disassembled everything and installed the bracket, EPS unit and shaft down to the Volvo steering box in the car including reinstalling the clutch and brake pedals. Fitment appears to be OK. Ran into a small problem with the brake switch which was solved by bending the spade terminals on the switch 90 deg from their original position. The EPS drive was not hitting the spade terminals; but, there was insufficient room between the EPS drive and the terminals to fit the connectors on the terminals.

      I thought I would get a chance today to power up the EPS in the car and give it a static test. However, I needed to clean up the wiring around the dash first so that I could make some decisions about how I wanted to route the power and control wiring for the EPS. Turns out reinstalling the ignition switch wiring, turn signal and OD switch was a bit more work than I expected, particularly since the old routing for some of this wiring is now blocked by the EPS drive so I never got to the point of doing the static test. Also, late in the afternoon the heavens opened up with a huge downpour which brought everything to a quick close.

      If it dries up (the Volvo is outside under a car cover in the summer) I should be able to do a static test of the EPS tomorrow. A driving test may be a day or two because I want to do a little clean up of the wiring under the dash.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 07-16-2019 at 09:26 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    14. #327
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      Sort of off topic-- Did you ever replace your stock OD switch with a momentary one?

    15. #328
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      Quote Originally Posted by thispunter View Post
      Sort of off topic-- Did you ever replace your stock OD switch with a momentary one?
      Nothing yet. The EPS has a higher utility function value so that has been my focus. However, as I was sorting out the wiring mess behind the cluster and trying to clean up the wiring for the ignition switch and signal light switch I was looking at the wiring for the OD switch and trying to decide whether I should do some pre wiring to accommodate the momentary contact style OD switch without having to rip everything apart again. So, its on the list.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    16. #329
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      EPS primary power wired up. I hooked up the control wire to 12 v briefly to get the EPS operating. Success. With the EPS powered up and the car immobile I could turn the 14" steering wheel with one hand sans effort. The car was on a packed gravel drive so the fact that the gravel rolls a little bit probably makes the wheels easier to steer back and forth when parked. It may require a little more effort on pavement. A test drive is pending clean up of the wiring behind the dash.

      I did run into a second fit problem. I mounted the controller unit on the side of the Volvo bracket opposite the EPS unit

      Complete column upright.jpg

      The controller interferes with the defrost nozzle on the driver's side and I had to remove the nozzle. You could avoid this problem by positioning the controller someplace else (don't ask me where). However, I think that by switching the left and right nozzles (the entrances point in opposite directions) the conflict might be eliminated. That will require a longer hose on both sides - if the switch works out.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    17. #330
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      That is some nice work, and very nice engineering!
      Steve

    18. #331
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      This has been really fun to watch, I hope you post some vids and pics of it in operation.
      1974 Volvo 142GL - B20 w/Redline Weber 32-36
      http://www.chrismathewsjr.com/volvo

    19. #332
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      The firewall gasket for the Volvo steering column has an approximately 2" diameter hole. With just the 3/4" shaft extending through the firewall, this leaves a large gap for engine compartment smells to enter the cabin. Turns out that the Speedway Firewall support bearing that I purchased and then abandoned as an idea is a perfect fit into the Volvo gasket (well a bit of a stretch).

      Firewall gasket.jpg

      I ground off the mounting ears and then glued the bearing into the gasket using slow cure CA. Its not providing any structural support, just seals around the shaft and sort of floats in the bellows in the gasket.

      firewall bearing.jpg

      I cut a hole in the gasket where the shift shaft on the BW35 exits and ran the leads for the power to the EPS through the hole. I pick up +12v off the starter terminal and ground at the engine ground strap mounting point. My battery is in the trunk and I run a separate #1 cable from the battery to the starter which is isolated from everything else in the car. It is important to have the EPS supply to the battery separated from any other running loads in the car. The EPS can draw a lot of current (its fused for 60 amps) and cause a fair amount of voltage drop. You don't want this affecting other devices in the car. I used #8 wire for the EPS supply.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 07-19-2019 at 11:11 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    20. #333
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      I discovered another physical conflict. When I did a preliminary check of the Versa collapsible column a rough measurement of the yoke on the Versa column suggested that it should clear the bottom of the firewall mounted windshield washer reservoir. The yoke is a tight fit; but, look at the preceding photo of the shaft at the firewall. I didn't take into consideration the head of the clamping bolt on the fitting that attaches to the stub shaft that fits through the firewall. The bolt bangs into the bottom of the reservoir. Mounting the reservoir higher up on the firewall is not an option because it is already at the top of the firewall (the bracket butts up against the seam where the firewall joins the cowl.

      There are other ways around this; but, I took the path of least resistance (for me) and one that didn't require buying lots of new stuff. When I did the restomod on the car, the battery was relocated into the trunk in part because at one time I thought I might turbocharge the engine and having the space available up front for intercooler plumbing would be convenient. That's not going to happen so I decided to relocate the washer reservoir into the space formerly taken up by the battery.

      washer bottle.jpg

      The up side to this is the it is much easier to fill the reservoir (which I have to do at least every 3 years ). Not an option if you still have a battery occupying that space. Its a fairly long chunk of hose from the front to the squirter nozzles so I may have to find a check valve to keep the line from draining back into the tank.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    21. #334
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      I had identified an interference problem between the driver side defrost nozzle and the way I mounted the EPS control unit. I thought that switching the left and right nozzles would fix this; but, no. However, a trip to the plumbing supply yielded a 1" short radius PVC 90 deg elbow that is a perfect fit for the defroster duct. Some work with a hacksaw, dremel and file allowed me to fit the elbow to the nozzle and have 1/4" clearance above the bracket and EPS controller. I attached the elbow to the nozzle with some clear seam sealer that I happened to have - sticks to everything, good at filling moderate gaps and very tough. The duct to the nozzle now runs above the steering column bracket.

      defrost dust.jpg
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    22. #335
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      Buttoned everything up (well, I did leave the lower valence off in case I have any issues - which I do). Took the car for a spin. First off, slow speed / parking steering with my 14 " steering wheel is a treat. No more grunting, definitely an A+. Slow speed right hand turns on red lights are a snap. Driving around at speed up to about 50 km/hr is just fine; but, I don't think I would want anymore assist. The car seems to lack for self centering on the steering; however, I must admit that I don't think the steering ever had much self centering action. I think most of what I took for self centering was just friction. I also admit that I have never had a correct wheel alignment so I may have insufficient caster. If I add some more camber then that may eliminate the sense that the level of assist is at the point where I definitely don't want any more. Also, I am running 185 tires. If I was running 205 tires I might be looking for a little more assist.

      While reinstalling my instrument cluster, I think I yanked the antenna lead out of my GPS speedo because the speedo just gives an 'acquiring' message. That indicates the speedo is working; but, not getting a signal. I will have to pull the cluster (good thing the lower valence is still off) and check the connection before I try a spin at 100 - 110 km/hr to see what it is like on the highway.

      I also have an interesting issue. I am having a little trouble getting the steering wheel centered in the dead ahead position. Perhaps with the two extra sets of splines (input and output shafts on the EPS unit) I have created some kind of angular displacement between the steering wheel spline and the steering box spline that I won't be able to zero out. Or perhaps I have been in just a little too much of a hurry is reassembling. We will see.

      Right now I am really happy with the results. Next step would be a correct wheel alignment and then perhaps fiddling with the CAN bus to see if I can get the EPS controller to accept a speed signal and determine what affect that has on assist.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    23. #336
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      142g;

      ...still following, with interest...now, I'd like to see your long-term experience report...!

      Cheers

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      A final (for now) summary of the project. Should something happen with the EPS I will try to remember to post an update.

      My first piece of advice is ignore all the internet postings that start with "EPS for $50". In 99% of the cases that is not happening. The only way you can come close to that is if you have a machine shop and welding equipment or a relative / friend with that equipment who is willing to do the work gratis. If you need to use an arms-length machinist / welder / fabricator who charges commercial rates to fabricate all the one-off pieces, you need to budget around $600 - $800 to get this done reasonably correctly. That would include all the miscellaneous bits such as the fuse holder, lugs, wiring and nuts and bolts (I used all new grade 8 - just because) and the Woodward coupler and parts I purchased from Speedway. This estimate does not include the price of parts that I purchased for test and did not use or the fact that because all of the parts that I ordered from the US came by courier services who charge horrendous brokerage fees (does everybody hate the US Postal Service?). My butt is still chapped over the Woodward 17 mm coupler that turned from around $20 list to $70 after it made its way to my doorstep. My suggested budget presumes that you pick up the EPS drive and controller at a pick and pull for $50 Cdn like I did. On Ebay, complete Versa columns run $250 - $500 US so factor that in to your budget if you are thinking about this. Of course, If you pay somebody else to do the installation, double the budget. All of a sudden the approximately $1500 that EZ Power Steering charges does not seem so unrealistic. Its all the custom one-off fabrication and welding that really costs a lot. If you can get that work gratis and can find the Versa column for around $50, then you could do this for less than $200.

      On to the my last test drive. I reconnected my loose GPS antenna yesterday and took the car for a spin at 100 - 110 km/hr. The amount of assist is not excessive; however, if you are one of those people who tends to apply a little steering input when they are looking around or fiddling with the stereo, the car will now follow that input. The Volvo steering box has a fair amount of drag in it and that drag did a pretty good job of nullifying small unintended steering inputs from the driver. With the assist from the EPS, that drag effect is gone so small movements at the steering wheel translate into changes in direction. I think the other factor is the replacement of the Volvo breakaway section in the steering column with the Versa collapsible section. Even though my breakaway column was new in 2014 I noticed that the rubber bushings in the connectors have already cracked. Even when new, the flex in the bushes and the two rubber couplings contributed to slop in the steering. My car has much less rotational 'slop' in the steering wheel in the dead ahead position than it used to. Pre conversion you could wiggle the steering wheel back and forth a few degrees at highway speeds and the car would not move. That has mostly disappeared and some people may not like that because you need to be more attentive. In the future, I might experiment a bit with loading vehicle speed to the EPS controller to see if I can reduce the assist a bit at highway speeds; but, based upon yesterdays test drive its not a particularly pressing issue for me. Note that I have a nominal 14" Moto Litta steering wheel. If you have a larger diameter steering wheel that provides a greater steering torque input and highway driving may become annoying because the car might be overly responsive to steering inputs at the steering wheel.

      Here is a picture of the complete Versa lower steering shaft section installed in the car. Remember it is installed top to bottom reversed in the Volvo compared to the original Versa installation. It probably provides about 100 - 125 mm of collapse.

      Lower column.jpg

      Here is a photo of the EPS drive installed in the car before I reinstalled the lower valence. The drive is tucked up high enough that it is hidden by the valence so no interference with your feet unless your feet are currently hitting the valence.

      Under dash completed.jpg

      In this photo you can just see the mounting for the max blade style fuse that I mounted on one of the bosses that formally was a pivot for the EPS column. I used a 60 amp fuse as per the original Versa installation. I expect that it should be possible to use a smaller fuse if you want. The fuse holder is positioned such that it is just at the lower edge of the valence so is theoretically accessible without removing the valence if it should blow. However, if you have ever tried to remove a Max fuse from its holder you will know that you will need to get in there with a pair of pliers because the fuse is really in there tight.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 07-23-2019 at 12:30 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    25. #338
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      A little follow-up on the installation.

      It still works; but, its not like I have been driving it a lot, in part because it has been quite hot here (black interior - no AC). I got to thinking about the level of base assist provided by the Versa EPAS unit and also thinking back to the salvage of the unit from the wrecked Versa. It so happens that the tire sizes on the Versa match what I am using on my 142 (185/65 15). So contact patch / drag on turning when parked should be similar (absent differences in camber and caster). The mechanical ratio of the Versa rack versus the Volvo box is an unknown; but, it might be a reasonable guess that the Versa rack might be faster (less mechanical advantage). My recollection from the salvage operation was also that the Versa steering wheel was very small in diameter, perhaps 13". As such, the base assist on the Versa is likely set up for a small steering wheel with a rack that may have a lower mechanical advantage. This may account for what I perceive as a steering effort that is bordering on the light side at highway speeds.

      Unless you are willing to try a rack and pinion installation, you can't really do anything about the Volvo steering box ratios. However, if you are considering the EPAS installation on your 140, I definitely recommend that you ditch the Volvo steering wheel. The Versa lower steering section that replaces the Volvo flexy collapsible thingy does make steering more direct. After some additional driving, I think the stock Volvo hoola hoop steering wheel would make steering on the highway very tiring - too much mechanical advantage. I have an ancient Moto Litta steering wheel. I don't know how Moto Litta specs its diameters; but, the outside diameter is somewhere between 14 - 15 ". Based upon my experience, a steering wheel in the order of 13" might be more pleasant at highway speeds. If you are also running 185 tires the Versa EPAS provides enough assistance that the parking maneuvers will still be quite comfortable with the 13 " wheel.

      The other experimental option is to consider is increasing the amount of caster angle. Increasing caster does tend to increase self aligning when travelling forward at speed. However, I have not thought through the potential negative effects of increased caster.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    26. #339
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      Small development. As the temperatures have been dropping here, I found the drivers side door getting very stiff to lock and unlock. It was getting to the point that I was concerned about twisting the key off. The lock cylinder did not appear to be jamming and squirting a little graphite in there made no difference to operation. So, yesterday it was interior door card removal time to have a look at the latch mechanism. When I rebuilt the car 5 years ago, I greased all the miscellaneous moving bits with Jigaloo white lithium grease. I discovered that this grease has either dried up or gone through a temperature transition that has made it more solid than fluid. I didn't want to go through the process of latch removal so I sprayed the back of the latch mechanism with brake cleaner to wash off as much of the grease as possible. This yielded an immediate improvement in latch operation. I have re greased with a non petroleum base grease which I hope won't dry / suffer from low temperature viscosity increase.

      Now to the point. In removing the door panel I fractured most of the remaining original plastic anchors. The anchors that I replaced a 5-6 years ago all appear OK. The anchor is part # 680097. They are still available for a reasonable price; but, shipping to me is ridiculous if I only need a few. I was looking for aftermarket equivalents and I came across these

      https://www.clipsandfasteners.com/Vo...n-p/a13191.htm

      The "Package Price: $999,945.67 " was entertaining - unless it meant that you were also buying the factory that made the parts.

      Does anybody have a handle on an aftermarket equivalent part # that I can check on to see if I can source locally or at least north of 49 and dodge the brokerage fees?
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    27. #340
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      “The "Package Price: $999,945.67 " was entertaining”

      At least you’d get free shipping!

      Try local auto parts stores, they usually have a rack of plastic fasteners, you might find something close that will work.

    28. #341
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      Depending upon how quick you need these, I may have some originals I can send you. Just cover the ride, and they're yours.
      I can try to get them off this weekend. Let me know if you want them and how many you need.
      Steve

    29. #342
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      Quote Originally Posted by 66Wildcat View Post
      Depending upon how quick you need these, I may have some originals I can send you. Just cover the ride, and they're yours.
      I can try to get them off this weekend. Let me know if you want them and how many you need.
      Steve
      Thanks; however, I have a feeling that if I clean up the passenger door latch I may need a significant number of the retainers between the two doors. There are a fair number on each door, so unless I can find an aftermarket part locally I will probably just suck up the freight costs and make one order.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    30. #343
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      VP has them, says there are 50 required. I don't recall there being 25 per side, but do recall quite a few.
      http://212.247.61.152/US/main.aspx?p...e&artno=680097

    31. #344
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      I like VP and have used them for a number of hard-to-find purchases. However, they ship via courier rather than postal service and the courier services have rather huge fixed brokerage and service fees when the product crosses the international border. Last item I got from VP was a replacement foam cushion for my front seat. I think the cushion was around $70 and the shipping and 'handling' fees were around $50. If I order small value items from VP, the shipping and handling will greatly exceed the cost of the item - a single retainer from VP it would probably cost $15. Hence my question about alternate parts with vendors located north of 49.

      I think the all time winner for shipping and handling costs was the Woodward 17mm coupler on my EPS project which was around $20 for the coupler and $40 for shipping and handling.

      I observe that a lot of companies like to use courier services which just kills their delivered product costs for me. Do they have some kind of hate-on for the US Postal service? My other silly car is an Acura NSX and I have found that I can order OEM parts directly from Japan through Amayama and the landed cost for me is always much, much less than it is from US based OEM on-line parts vendors that use courier. Japan Post rates are low and include insurance and tracking. Takes perhaps 7 days longer to arrive than getting it from the US via a courier.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 10-26-2019 at 12:58 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    32. #345
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      Small update.

      I think it was last year that I installed the Anco classic or vintage style stainless steel windshield wiper blades. Finally had a chance to try them out in a light mist this morning. The conclusion is that on my 1971 142, these qualify as window dressing. They contact the glass on the outside edges of the blade pretty much leaving the center part of the blade up high off the glass - too much curve in the blade and it was cold and wet so I was not inclined to experiment to see if I could remove some of the curve. Right now the conclusion is that these are for show only.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    33. #346
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      Ran into a little problem with my car last week after it had been sitting for a while. Specifically, the starter was cranking very slowly making for an understandably hard start. To help diagnose a starter versus a wiring versus a battery problem, I connected my lap top up to the Megasquirt and logged the start. The MS measures the voltage directly off of the + distribution block on the car which is directly off the battery + terminal.

      The log shows that the battery terminal voltage was dropping as low as 6.4 volts during cranking.

      Voltage recording.JPG

      The voltage at the starter motor terminals would have been even lower. If I had the original style starter motor the car never would have started. On the log you can see that the RPM signal is going to zero and the MAP signal is going to 100 kPa on occassion which I expect is occurring because the voltage is dropping below the limits on the sensors. I am surprised that it started because I did not define the fuel and ignition starting parameters for a voltage below 8 volts.
      The no load voltage on the battery was a nudge under 12 volts so definitely not in good shape and the fact that it crashes below 7 volts during cranking indicates an internal high resistance, so definitely time for a replacement. The existing battery was a group 35 and when I pulled it I discovered that it must have had some leakage around the terminals because there were signs of corrosion damage in the tray. I cleaned up the corrosion and sealed the bare metal with one of those spray on rust converter / primer products (it was getting too cold for conventional paint – that is now next year country). I elected to go for an AGM battery because they are supposed to be sealed. I also elected to switch to a group 51R which is the battery that is common on Honda Civics and the like. Smaller and lighter than the group 35 and much easier to install in my location over the rear axle hump in the trunk.

      The battery replacement may now be academic. It snowed some on Saturday night and I figured ‘its going to melt’. Then it snowed on Sunday and again on Monday and Tuesday and the roads now have a nice coat of ice on them so I am thinking its end of Volvo season. I am not going to be driving it anywhere so I will have to fill up my 10 l gas can so I can add some fuel stabilizer and top off the gas tank to prep it for storage.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 10-30-2019 at 03:22 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    34. #347
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      Sorta wild about the cost!

      They have a storefront on Amazon and have them listed there. I bought a box back in February 2019 so I'd have them on hand.

      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0040CTZAK/

    35. #348
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      For apico500

      Bosch PWM idle air valve and Volvo 850 TPS with adapter plate

      PWM valve mounting.jpg

      Toyota Corolla Coil On Plug installation

      COP installation.jpg

      Lexus Main relay and fuse box on fender wall, externally mounted MAP sensor on fender and GM MAT sensor mounted where cold start injector was located

      New main relay and fuse box.jpg

      Exhaust heat shield for injectors and mounting for Nissan 280Z fuel pressure regulator (just visible at top)

      Heat shield 2.jpg

      Cam angle sensor from Hyundai Sonata with Yoshifab high resolution disc mounted on Yoshifab adapter. Cover removed from sensor for adjustment.

      Mounted CAS.jpg
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    36. #349
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      More MS2 Sequential details for apico500

      Modified V3.00 mother board - MS2 daughter card not plugged into socket on mother board. Note all the missing injector drivers and ignition control on heat sink. The only original components left on the hint sink are the voltage regulator. The TIP 122 transistor on the right end is a modification to allow for operation of the PWM idle valve. Note all the empty spots on the mother board. The green add on card has the four VND type drivers for the injectors and two TC4427 (dual) divers for the four logic level ignition control outputs. The VND devices are not a simple MOSFET. They are an integrated device with internal protection and shutdown circuits which eliminates a bunch of stuff on the motherboard. The VND devices do not support PWM injector control which was a feature in the original B&G code to allow you to use low resistance fuel injectors (like on the D jet) without having an external voltage dropping resistor (like the D jet had). I don't think very may people (anybody?) uses the PWM injector control feature with low resistance injectors. Using 4 x 6 ohm 25 watt resistors is a much more robust solution that does not require any software configuration and only costs about $12 for the resistors (just like Bosch did from the days of D jet right through to the 1990s).

      Modified MS board.jpg
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    37. #350
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      Heat shield details for apico500

      Mounting holes for heat shield drilled into intake manifold between 1&2 and 3&4 runners. I believe they are tapped for 6-32 machine screws (might be #8).

      mounting holes.jpg

      Heat shield. You can just see the two small holes for the mounting screws.

      Heat shield.jpg

      Heat shield installed

      Mounted.jpg

      The heat shield set up a resonant buzz around 1200- 1400 RPM. To fix that, I added stiffening strips of about .125" thick by .75" wide aluminum to the front and back edges of the heat shield held in place by rivets (not in these photos). That fixed the buzz. Later I had the heat shield powder coated silver along with a bunch of my other home made brackets so they looked less like they were made in my garage with a hammer and hacksaw.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 11-14-2019 at 06:07 PM.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

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