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    1. #36
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      Wonderfull photos! Yes, I kept the 142 as original as possible I even kept the lights on the sides of the fenders. Most volvo's in the Netherlands that were imported from the States have them removed. But because it is an American car I kept them in place. But I made a few changes to the car. It was equipped with an automatic transmission and I changed that to a 4 gear + OD gearbox. The color changed from gold ( 105) to red ( 103) which is actually a volvo 164 color. Another major change was the roof, I removed it complete and fitted one back with a genuine Golden sunroof. Unfortunately I lost the photos of that job.
      I started with the project in 1995 and i hope it will be finished the coming spring.

      Best regards,

      Mathieu.
      I was wondering about the sunroof. Your VIN number says no sunroof and the first photos of the gold car didn't appear to show a sunroof, yet the photos of the car in the body shop definitely show a sunroof. I briefly thought about salvaging just the sunroof and mechanism from a donor car and retrofitting it to mine; however, the cutting and fitting and trying to get the mechanism to work properly was going to be really expensive and not without risk of failure. Much smarter to do like you have and just graft a completely new roof on to the body if you have a good donor and can do a good job of reinforcing the attachment points. Where did you do you make your connections between the roof and the body, at the top, mid-way or at the bottom of the pillars?

      2014 - 1995 = 19 years, that is definitely maintaining a long-term view towards an end goal! By the time mine is running, also (I hope) in the spring of 2014, it will have been 10 years for me. It might be an entertaining post on Swedespeed to see who has had the longest duration restoration or resto-mod project and what the average time is for a project.

      Neil

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    3. #37
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      Hi Neil,

      I cut the pillars about 5" from the top. I was an interesting job to get the new roof in place! First it took me about 4 years to find a suitable donor car. 142s with a sunroof are difficult to find but eventually I found one. Before I remove the old roof I welded 1/2" tubes in the windows/doors to be sure that the new roof should be in the same position. I must say that I am very satisfied with the result! After the new roof was fitted the car was ready for the paintshop, that took me another 3 years. Rather difficult to find the right paintshop with the right price. Pergaps I will make one more modification, an electrical driven powersteering. There is a Dutch company which has developed an electrical driven power steering for the vintage volvo cars that are very easy to fitt. A man in our village fitted it to his amazon and it is realy nice to see how the steering improved. Some images can be seen here: http://www.ezpowersteering.nl/language/158/17/Home.html

      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      Last edited by rixt; 01-13-2014 at 04:32 PM.

    4. #38
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      I cut the pillars about 5" from the top. I was an interesting job to get the new roof in place! First it took me about 4 years to find a suitable donor car. 142s with a sunroof are difficult to find but eventually I found one. Before I remove the old roof I welded 1/2" tubes in the windows/doors to be sure that the new roof should be in the same position. I must say that I am very satisfied with the result! After the new roof was fitted the car was ready for the paintshop, that took me another 3 years. Rather difficult to find the right paintshop with the right price. Pergaps I will make one more modification, an electrical driven powersteering. There is a Dutch company which has developed an electrical driven power steering for the vintage volvo cars that are very easy to fitt. A friend of me fitted it to his amazon and it is realy nice to see how the steering improved. Some images can be seen here: http://www.ezpowersteering.nl/language/158/17/Home.html

      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      I agree that sunroofs are pretty rare. You can find lots of late 70's and early 80's 240's with sunroofs; but, I have never seen a 140 in Canada with a sunroof.

      I had researched the EZ power steering about 3-4 years ago and thought it was a really nice looking unit. However, my recollection is that EZ does not sell kits. The installations have to be done by a dealer because of the custom fabrication requirements (machining splines on to the steering shaft) so it didn't work for me. I looked at another electric assist kit available in the US called Electra Steer. The Electra Steer seems to be oriented towards the vintage US Hot Rod market which typically have a lot more space behind the dash to allow installation. It was definitely cheaper than the EZ unit; but, it required cutting the steering column (which means no second thoughts) and it wasn't clear that I would be able to get it to fit.

      If you do the EZ power steering install on your 140, I think that there may be a lot of interest in hearing about your results. I recall that some people have talked about retrofitting the power steering units off of 160 series car (which is a really big piece of hardware!). I know that the Volvo parts manual for the 140 shows power steering components; however, I have never heard of a 140 coming with power steering and the Volvo service manual makes no reference to repair procedures for power steering, so I am not sure what the listings in the parts manual are for.

      Neil

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    6. #39
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      They do sell EZ steering direct as a kit, they only recommend that you have skills enough to install the steering column. Cost is around $1800.

      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      I agree that sunroofs are pretty rare. You can find lots of late 70's and early 80's 240's with sunroofs; but, I have never seen a 140 in Canada with a sunroof.

      I had researched the EZ power steering about 3-4 years ago and thought it was a really nice looking unit. However, my recollection is that EZ does not sell kits. The installations have to be done by a dealer because of the custom fabrication requirements (machining splines on to the steering shaft) so it didn't work for me. I looked at another electric assist kit available in the US called Electra Steer. The Electra Steer seems to be oriented towards the vintage US Hot Rod market which typically have a lot more space behind the dash to allow installation. It was definitely cheaper than the EZ unit; but, it required cutting the steering column (which means no second thoughts) and it wasn't clear that I would be able to get it to fit.

      If you do the EZ power steering install on your 140, I think that there may be a lot of interest in hearing about your results. I recall that some people have talked about retrofitting the power steering units off of 160 series car (which is a really big piece of hardware!). I know that the Volvo parts manual for the 140 shows power steering components; however, I have never heard of a 140 coming with power steering and the Volvo service manual makes no reference to repair procedures for power steering, so I am not sure what the listings in the parts manual are for.

      Neil

    7. #40
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      Quote Originally Posted by Brandom View Post
      They do sell EZ steering direct as a kit, they only recommend that you have skills enough to install the steering column. Cost is around $1800.
      That is interesting. I went back and checked their website. On their quote form they say that you have to be a dealer in order to acquire a kit. Where did you find the info on purchases by non dealers?

    8. #41
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      Ok, my original communication with EZ landed me here: http://thedrivenman.com/

      In speaking with Robert Hall at TheDrivenMan they do sell direct. His email is [email protected]

      I specifically asked about this and was told that the recommendation was that you be a skilled mechanic but they will still sell you the unit.

      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      That is interesting. I went back and checked their website. On their quote form they say that you have to be a dealer in order to acquire a kit. Where did you find the info on purchases by non dealers?

    9. #42
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      Quote Originally Posted by Brandom View Post
      Ok, my original communication with EZ landed me here: http://thedrivenman.com/

      In speaking with Robert Hall at TheDrivenMan they do sell direct. His email is [email protected]

      I specifically asked about this and was told that the recommendation was that you be a skilled mechanic but they will still sell you the unit.
      Thanks. I will have to check him out. Something to consider once I get the car running and need something new to do!

    10. #43
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      Hi neil,

      That man in our village just bought a kit and fitted it himself in a few hours. But in the Netherlands there are several vintage volvo with selfmade electrical power steering. They are using the parts from a Opel Corsa B and modify them so that you can use them for the volvos. The parts a easy to get by Ebay in german or the UK. See as example: http://www.ebay.de/itm/Opel-Corsa-B-...item43bc9ccc5e There is a man selling ready to fitt sets for about $ 750. The only difficulty with this sets is to get them adjusted to your driving speed. Some use a rheostat the adjust it and some other used a speedsensor that are used on bikes to get a pulse signal that automaticly adjust the powersteering. If you are interested I'll see if I can find more information about that selfmade powersteering.

      Best regards,

      Mathieu.
      Last edited by rixt; 01-13-2014 at 04:33 PM.

    11. #44
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    12. #45
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      Quote Originally Posted by gdill2 View Post
      That is an interesting find. Was the power steering a dealer installed option that was available on 1972 and later models (I have a brochure of the options for the 1971 model year and power steering is not one of them)?

    13. #46
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi neil,

      That friend of me just bought a kit and fitted it himself in a few hours. But in the Netherlands there are several vintage volvo with selfmade electrical power steering. They are using the parts from a Opel Corsa B and modify them so that you can use them for the volvos. The parts a easy to get by Ebay in german or the UK. See as example: http://www.ebay.de/itm/Opel-Corsa-B-...item43bc9ccc5e There is a man selling ready to fitt sets for about $ 750. The only difficulty with this sets is to get them adjusted to your driving speed. Some use a rheostat the adjust it and some other used a speedsensor that are used on bikes to get a pulse signal that automaticly adjust the powersteering. If you are interested I'll see if I can find more information about that selfmade powersteering.

      Best regards,

      Mathieu.
      Mathieu

      Did your friend buy an EZ kit or did he get one based upon the Opel Corsa B? I had found a thread on the UK Volvo forum where a 140 owner discussed the installation of a Opel Corsa based power steering unit that he had acquired from some fabricator in the Netherlands. Sounds like the same fabricator as you are talking about. His initial results were positive.

      The EZ system appeals to me primarily because it looks like a well engineered system and is definitely using new components. I don't mind spending a little extra for something that has had the problems worked out. That said, I may also explore the Opel Corsa B option. However, first things first which is I have to get the engine started and tuned, which is not going to happen until spring. On December 23 I woke up and the weather report said -49deg C with the wind chill - so I went back to bed! Spring isn't going to come soon enough!

    14. #47
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      Hi Neil,

      That friend bought a brand new one from EZ. He wanted one from EZ becuase every part is new and you get warantey. That man that sells the powersteering with Corsa parts is very active with vintage volvo's one other project of him is a Amazon with a B 18 with turbo! On a Dutch forum he wrote a long topic about that modification, see: http://www.volvokv.nl/forum/viewtopi...n&f=34&t=17203 Unfortunately in Dutch but perhaps with Google translate it might be possible to understand the story.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      Last edited by rixt; 12-29-2013 at 04:15 PM.

    15. #48
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      That friend bought a brand new one from EZ. He wanted one from EZ becuase every part is new and you get warantey. That man that sells the powersteering with Corsa parts is very active with vintage volvo's one other project of him is a Amazon with a B 18 with turbo! On a Dutch forum he wrote a long topic about that modification, see: http://www.volvokv.nl/forum/viewtopi...n&f=34&t=17203 Unfortunately in Dutch but perhaps with Google translate it might be possible to understand the story.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      Mathieu

      Thank you. I will definitely have a look at the link you sent.

      Neil

    16. #49
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      That friend bought a brand new one from EZ. He wanted one from EZ becuase every part is new and you get warantey. That man that sells the powersteering with Corsa parts is very active with vintage volvo's one other project of him is a Amazon with a B 18 with turbo! On a Dutch forum he wrote a long topic about that modification, see: http://www.volvokv.nl/forum/viewtopi...n&f=34&t=17203 Unfortunately in Dutch but perhaps with Google translate it might be possible to understand the story.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      Two more questions. Did your friend who did the EZ install do it on a Volvo 140 or on some other car? It is not clear to me from the EZ website that they have a kit made up for the 140 although I did see a photograph of their system mounted on a 140 steering column (it was a later model 140 with the ignition switch mounted off to the side rather than directly on the side of the steering column). Second, did he purchase it form a dealer or directly from EZ? The EZ website implies that they only sell kits to dealers.

    17. #50
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      Hi Neil,

      I am at sea at the moment but I hope to be home by Wednesday and I'll ask that fellow. He used it for an Amazon but he has also a p 1800 with EZ powersteering.


      Best regards,

      Mathieu.

    18. #51
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      I believe what it comes down to is how you purchase it. EZ will not sell to you direct but a dealer will.. so the dealer (the information I provided earlier) will get you the ability to purchase. When I contacted EZ I was told "No Way" but the dealer said "Yes Way".. It all boils down to $$ and I doubt a dealer will pass up the opportunity if it presents itself.

      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      Two more questions. Did your friend who did the EZ install do it on a Volvo 140 or on some other car? It is not clear to me from the EZ website that they have a kit made up for the 140 although I did see a photograph of their system mounted on a 140 steering column (it was a later model 140 with the ignition switch mounted off to the side rather than directly on the side of the steering column). Second, did he purchase it form a dealer or directly from EZ? The EZ website implies that they only sell kits to dealers.

    19. #52
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      I think I have noted in previous posts that I am switching out my D jet for a MegaSquirt system. The primary reasons for doing this are that my D jet has been dormant for 30+ years, and I have no confidence that it still operates. Even if it does operate, most of the D jet specific components (throttle switch, timing contacts, pressure sensor) are out of production and only available as rebuilds or salvage at some pretty hefty costs so long term serviceability will likely be an issue. The D jet controller is actually the least of my concerns as it has discrete component construction and is easily repairable. If I were building a concours car, or racing in a class that required vintage components, I would want to retain the D jet system. I am doing neither so I don’t feel that constraint. The MegaSquirt has the advantage of using readily available components in the engine bay plus fine tuning is easy (at least relative to the D jet which requires unsoldering and changing discreet components on the daughter board to alter the tune). The Megasquirt also allows for incorporation of a feedback signal from an O2 sensor to adjust fuel mixture in real time.

      I will be upfront and note that not much of my Megasquirt install is very original. I cribbed most of the design to Steve Berry’s write-up on 1800philes.com and Eric Reuter’s description of his Amazon B20E project.

      The first issue at hand was whether I would re-use the Bosch 280-150-036 injectors. I set up a quick test rig with a pressurized brake bleeder and air compressor using some low volatility solvent in the brake bleeder to check the operation of the injectors. I energized the injectors using a couple of AA batteries. With the air compressor regulator set at approximately 30 psig, two of the injectors appeared to operate satisfactorily, one leaked relentlessly and the fourth did not flow anything at all. So, I needed two new injectors. The stock Bosch injectors flow lots of fuel (approx 380cc/min @ 43.5 psi) so I didn’t need a larger injector. Replacement Bosch injectors are available, although a bit pricey. I decided to take a risk and ordered the Beck Arnley replacement for the Bosch part since they were fairly inexpensive (relative to the Bosch part). The only down side to the BA injectors is that they are black so I no longer have color matching injectors.

      My biggest concern with the BA injectors was whether they would have the same delivery rate as the Bosch injectors. In fact, although the two remaining Bosch injectors operated and did not leak, I wasn’t totally confident in their delivery rate either. Inconsistent fuel delivery rates would make tuning a nightmare. To address this concern, I again set up my brake bleeder / air compressor test rig. This time I wired up a 555 mono stable timer through a relay to give me a consistent on time for the injectors and measured the delivery from the injectors into a graduated cylinder with the air compressor set at 30 psi. I did this three times for each injector. The average value of cc/min measured with this test rig did not exactly match the design spec (corrected to 30 psi) for the Bosch injector; however, the important thing is that all four injectors delivered a consistent amount of the test solvent (with in a range of -1% to +2.6%) over the set of three tests on each injector. I attribute the failure of the test flow rates to match the design spec to three things. The pressure gauge on my compressor is low accuracy and precision so I don’t know what the true delivery pressure was on the injector. The timer circuit gave consistent times; but, because of the low tolerance capacitor and resistor used in the timer circuit and the delay associated with the interposing relay, the actual injector on time was likely different than the calculated value. Finally, I don’t know how close the viscosity of the test solvent was to gasoline. My primary objective in selecting the solvent was to avoid creating the conditions for a nifty explosion. Anyway, the important part was that the BA and Bosch injectors have consistent delivery rates. Also of importance was the fact that the original Bosch injectors delivered a spray that appeared to be evenly atomized so they must be acceptably clean.

      After examination of my fuel injection wiring harness, I decided that it was suitable for reuse (with some appropriate modification of course). Because of brittle insulation due to heat exposure, the harness did require that new sections of wire be spliced on to the terminations to the coolant sensor and the injectors. I did not terminate the fuel injection harness directly into the 39 pin connector on the Megasquirt. Rather, I terminated the harness on some terminal strips that were mounted on a couple of aluminum strips which were cut and drilled to match the carrier for the original D jet control unit under the passenger seat. I also mounted the Megasquirt box on these strips as shown in the following photo.



      The serial port on the Megasquirt faces the back of the car so it is accessible for on-the-go tuning. You can see the Megasquirt mounted in the car in the following photo.



      Unfortunately, the installation was not perfect. When I mounted the Megasquirt box on the aluminum strips, I located it far enough forward to reduce the risk of it being kicked by a back seat passenger and far enough back to clear the bar that goes around the front of the passenger seat base. I even remembered to include the measurements for the cover for the 39 pin connector on the front of the Megasquirt when doing this. However, I failed to allow for the large radius bend in the cable that connects to the 39 pin connector which causes the cable to hit the bar on the front of the seat base. In order to get clearance between the cable and the seat base, I had to remove the cover from the 39 pin connector and bend the individual wires at a 90 deg angle where they at the connector. This isn’t so bad; but, I have to come up with a way of securing the cable so that it does not flex and cause failure of the terminations on the 39 pin connector. The obvious solution is to remove the separate split loom coverings on the cable and then wrap all the connectors together and secure the cable with wire ties. A neater solution would be a cover for the 39 pin connector with a 90 deg offset; however, the local electronics supplier did not have such an animal.

      A bit of discussion on my reasons for using an interposing terminal block between the Megasquirt and the wiring harness. First off, if I screwed up with the wiring, it is much easier to re terminate on a screw terminal than it is to re solder a wire on the 39 pin connector, particularly when the harness can no longer be pulled out of the car. So far this hasn’t been an issue. A preliminary check with temporary 12v power using Tuner Studio shows that I can see the IAT, coolant temperature, MAP sensor (not mounted on the MS board) and get throttle position switch operation. A complete test has to wait until spring. The second reason is that I plan to implement spark control after I get the fuel management up and running and tuned. The terminal block allows easy re termination to facilitate spark control (the harness is set up with the spare wires marked to facilitate the switch over). The third reason is that after re termination to the various sensors on the engine, the factory harness is left with a number of spare wires which I have terminated on spares on the terminal block. This will allow for ‘future’ modifications, although I am not sure what these might be.

      I decided against mounting the MAP sensor on the Megasquirt motherboard. Since I was retaining the original mounting location for the control unit, running the manifold vacuum line around a bunch of 90 deg bends and under the carpet did not seem like the best plan. Since I had four wires in the original harness to the D jet manifold sensor, I just reused three of these for the MAP sensor. I mounted the sensor in a small utility box which is mounted on an L bracket at the same location as the original D jet sensor. I used a Deutsche weather tight connector to terminate the MAP sensor. I like the Deutsche connectors a lot. They look good, they are relatively easy to terminate and it is easy to move the pins around if you screw up the termination. I used a number of them for terminating various devices on the car.






      The Bosch injectors are low impedance injectors. When you read posts on the Megasquirt forums, the success rate with using PWM on Megasquirt has been variable, so I elected to go the easy route and use external voltage dropping resistors. My plan was to use the injector resistor pack off of some car that used the Bosch LH jet system which I figured would be as common as dirt (any Volvo, BMW, VW ... from the early 80s to the early 90s). Turns out, where I live, European wreckers seem to get sold off to specialists and the cars disappear to some other market. If I wanted a Bosch resistor pack it was going to have to be new and the OEM Volvo part was a couple hundred $. While at my electronics supplier, I stumbled across some 50 watt 5 or 6 ohm 5% resistors. I think they were Stackpole brand. They had brought in a whole bunch to sell to the guys that install LED signal lights in their cars. Anyway, the resistance was perfect for the Bosch injectors and the price was right (about $15 for four).

      I wanted to find a small relay box to mount the fuses and relays for the FI system up on the passenger side fender. I figured something off of a Honda Civic or the like would work fine. Unfortunately, we no longer seem to have pick and pull yards that you can wander around looking for something that might fit. With the wreckers that I visited, if you don’t have a make, model year and specific part, you aren’t getting anything! So I ended up mounting my main FI relay and fuel pump relay in roughly the original location. I kept the original fuse box on the driver’s side of the car and used it for the main FI fuse and the fuel pump fuse. I needed four additional fuses, one for the Megasquirt unit, one for my wideband O2 controller and two for supply to the fuel injector resistors (I separated the supplies to the two separate injector banks). In the absence of a nice relay box, I purchased some individual weather tight fuse enclosures and mounted these along the top of a piece of 1 ¼” aluminum angle. I attached a second piece of 1 ½” aluminum angle under the first piece to form a Z. I mounted the resistors under this to provide them with some protection. The aluminum does secondary duty as a heat sink for the resistors. This is all mounted along the right side fender wall. As can be seen in the photo below, it is not the most sanitary looking set-up. If anybody knows of a nice, small, splash resistant relay/fuse box that would fit in that area in front of the hinge mounting point, let me know!




      Megasquirt calculates fuel delivery based upon the assumption of a constant pressure differential across the injector. This requires a pressure referenced fuel regulator to vary the fuel rail pressure as the manifold pressure changes. Because of the barbed fittings on the D jet fuel rail, the go to regulator seems to be one off of a Datsun 280 Z. The 280 Z regulator has a spot welded bracket mounted on it which does not work on the Volvo as the bracket is tacked on at about a 30 deg angle. Most Megasquirt installations using the D jet fuel rail seem to rely on the fuel rail and the return fuel line to hold the regulator in place. This didn’t strike me as a very satisfactory solution. I cut the bracket off and mounted the regulator in the stock location on the firewall using a piece of hose and a clamp on the outlet line to hold the regulator tight in the bracket. This ends up with the inlet to the regulator pointed in the wrong direction and required the fabrication of a piece of Z shaped fuel line tubing with barbs to connect the fuel rail to the regulator. You can definitely tell than it is non stock; however, it does not look too mickey mouse.



      I replaced the D jet throttle position switch with one from a Volvo 850. Once again I sourced the part from Beck Arnley. Mounting the switch required the fabrication of a new mounting plate for the switch and that the shaft on the throttle plate be shortened about 10 mm.



      I continue to run the original Bosch 3 port pump. The pump motor died back in 1976 and was replaced with the motor from a 2 port pump which was a direct fit (the dealer did not have a 3 port pump in stock). The carrier for the pump and filter at the back of the car was pretty banged up and the tabs on the carrier that the mounting bolts go through had fractured and been re welded at least once, so I had Dave fabricate a new one out of aluminium. Aluminum is not particularly ductile (much more stress fracture than steel) so I had Dave add a number of gussets into the corners and the mounting tabs. The reduced weight of the part was really noticeable when I had to drop the pump / filter assembly and hold it overhead by hand while I repositioned some fuel lines. Dave suggested polishing and clear coating the carrier; but, I figured that was a little over the top so we finished it off in black satin. After painting, it looks just like the original piece so I didn’t bother with a photo.

      I am retaining the original auxiliary air valve for warm up idle control. I am using the output transistor for the fast idle valve control function in Megasquirt to control the electric fan relay on the radiator based upon coolant temperature. Since the D jet aux regulator seems to be out of production, if it dies in the future, I may have to do some programming and soldering to create an additional output to control a relay for an electric fast idle valve. I have left spare wires in the fuel injection wiring harness that will make hooking up an electric fast idle valve and interposing relay relatively easy. Grafting the aux air regulator off of a K jet system might also be a future option; however, some brief checking suggests that it is also out of production.

      I have noted that once I get the fuel part of the Megasquirt sorted, I plan to implement spark control within Megasquirt. Beyond that, I would like to consider some form of knock control. I suspect that knock sensing using a conventional piezoelectric sensor is likely a non-starter with the B20 engine because of all the valvetrain noise. It might be possible with the use of a narrow sample window and I would be interested to know whether anybody has tried this with success. It would depend on whether you could make the window narrow enough to still capture the detonation event and block out the other noises. A more robust option might be to attempt ion sensing as used in some Saabs and I think some Harley Davidsons. Ion sensing would require implementing coil on plug ignition. With enough calculating horsepower, you could potentially do individual cylinder spark timing. Doing ion sense would depend on the ability to source a suitable ignition coil with the sensing components built in. I am not interested in fabricating my own ignition coil with external sensing components. That might be relatively easy to do in a bench test environment; but, transferring a bench test setup to the real world under the hood operating environment with reasonable expectations for durability requires a lot of money and design work. I know that Delphi offers up a compact coil on plug with the sensing electronics built in; however, I don’t know the application so I can’t source one to play with. Delphi’s primary focus seems to be as an OEM supplier and they don’t provide product application guides (that I can find). I continue to look around to try and find out which engines are using the Delphi ion sense coils so I can acquire one to do some testing.
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 01-03-2014 at 12:18 PM.

    20. #53
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      Nice! I also have plans for running MS.. What version did you end up going with? I have my eye on a MS3 controller. You know you can add bluetooth to these which negates having to have cable access even though having a backup method for accessing it is also nice.

      Are injectors that costly that you would mix and match like you did? Why not just get a set of 4?

      I'm very interested to see how you approach spark control.

      Will you be performing the preliminary tuning or getting assistance from someone that knows how to tune MS for these B20's?

    21. #54
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      Quote Originally Posted by Brandom View Post
      Nice! I also have plans for running MS.. What version did you end up going with? I have my eye on a MS3 controller. You know you can add bluetooth to these which negates having to have cable access even though having a backup method for accessing it is also nice.

      Are injectors that costly that you would mix and match like you did? Why not just get a set of 4?

      I'm very interested to see how you approach spark control.

      Will you be performing the preliminary tuning or getting assistance from someone that knows how to tune MS for these B20's?
      I am doing MS2 with the version 3 motherboard, or are you referring to the version of code that I am using? I have seen Bluetooth interfaces for OBDII ports; but, have never seen one for the serial or USB ports on Megasquirt. That said, I don't have any Bluetooth devices (no thank-you smartphone!) so that is of no value to me. The USB interface on the MS3 would have been nice; however, the external USB - serial adapter is working just fine with my laptop, although the adapter sticking out of the serial port could damage the pins in the port if you whacked it.

      The Bosch injectors were going for around $200 a piece. At the time, RockAuto was having one of their 'clearances' and the new (you can get rebuilt for less) BA injectors were selling for around $50. You make a good observation that at $100 for two more, having a matched set would not have been a bad idea. However, at the time I didn't know whether the BA injectors would be good or garbage. Turns out they initially appear to be as good as the Bosch although we don't know what the long term will be like - yet!

      My initial plans for spark control are pretty simple. I plan to retain the distributor and use it to do my triggering (I have replaced the points with a Pertronix unit). Steve Berry has a good discussion about his Megasquirt spark control implementation on a B20E on 1800philes. If I decide to try the ion sense knock control, then things will be more interesting. However, I see that as being at least a year away before I start that project.

      Where I live, I am not aware of anyone who has executed a B20 on Megasquirt. My plans are to use the maps that Steve Berry offered up as a starting point and go from there using my wide band O2 sensor and lots of on-road testing. Unfortunately, there are no local chassis dynamometers so its going to be on the road testing. There is a local engine dynamometer; however, it is at a race engine building shop and those guys seem to have a perpetual back log. Plus, I am not pulling the engine to do a tune!

    22. #55
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      I initially spec'd out a 123 ignition for the B20 but (And I cannot cite it) I remember a thread somewhere that stated it was a waste of money if you were wanting to implement spark control with MS. I also looked into knock sensor because original plans were to turbo but that those plans were also scrapped.

      For MS3 this is the unit I was looking at. http://www.diyautotune.com/ms3-pro.html

      For Bluetooth you can still use a laptop, you don't really have to have a smartphone.

      I'm still looking at Jenvey ITB's instead of the stock Djet manifold/injector setup however I do love what you are doing. There are no real threads that get in depth with this, at least not to the point where questions are answered, etc. I'm pretty much on my own when it comes to a tune as well. What are your HP/Torque goals?




      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      I am doing MS2 with the version 3 motherboard, or are you referring to the version of code that I am using? I have seen Bluetooth interfaces for OBDII ports; but, have never seen one for the serial or USB ports on Megasquirt. That said, I don't have any Bluetooth devices (no thank-you smartphone!) so that is of no value to me. The USB interface on the MS3 would have been nice; however, the external USB - serial adapter is working just fine with my laptop, although the adapter sticking out of the serial port could damage the pins in the port if you whacked it.

      The Bosch injectors were going for around $200 a piece. At the time, RockAuto was having one of their 'clearances' and the new (you can get rebuilt for less) BA injectors were selling for around $50. You make a good observation that at $100 for two more, having a matched set would not have been a bad idea. However, at the time I didn't know whether the BA injectors would be good or garbage. Turns out they initially appear to be as good as the Bosch although we don't know what the long term will be like - yet!

      My initial plans for spark control are pretty simple. I plan to retain the distributor and use it to do my triggering (I have replaced the points with a Pertronix unit). Steve Berry has a good discussion about his Megasquirt spark control implementation on a B20E on 1800philes. If I decide to try the ion sense knock control, then things will be more interesting. However, I see that as being at least a year away before I start that project.

      Where I live, I am not aware of anyone who has executed a B20 on Megasquirt. My plans are to use the maps that Steve Berry offered up as a starting point and go from there using my wide band O2 sensor and lots of on-road testing. Unfortunately, there are no local chassis dynamometers so its going to be on the road testing. There is a local engine dynamometer; however, it is at a race engine building shop and those guys seem to have a perpetual back log. Plus, I am not pulling the engine to do a tune!

    23. #56
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      Quote Originally Posted by Brandom View Post
      I initially spec'd out a 123 ignition for the B20 but (And I cannot cite it) I remember a thread somewhere that stated it was a waste of money if you were wanting to implement spark control with MS. I also looked into knock sensor because original plans were to turbo but that those plans were also scrapped.

      For MS3 this is the unit I was looking at. http://www.diyautotune.com/ms3-pro.html

      For Bluetooth you can still use a laptop, you don't really have to have a smartphone.

      I'm still looking at Jenvey ITB's instead of the stock Djet manifold/injector setup however I do love what you are doing. There are no real threads that get in depth with this, at least not to the point where questions are answered, etc. I'm pretty much on my own when it comes to a tune as well. What are your HP/Torque goals?
      I think that it is correct to say that if you are implementing spark control through Megasquirt, you have the ability to implement anything in terms of spark timing control based upon manifold pressure or engine rpm that could be implemented in a 123 distributor. As such, the programming capabilities of the 123 distributor would be wasted if you are using Megasquirt for timing control. I seem to recall something about an issue with the 123 distributor and the way that the vacuum retard is set up on the stock B20E; but, I can't remember the specifics.

      That version of the MS3 looks like a nice unit. It has a lot more capability than I am looking for. In the absence of having an O2 sensor on individual exhaust runners I don't think I would be planning on implementing individual cylinder trim although the self diagnostic, self healing capability looks interesting. It is also a really expensive solution compared to the path I took of assembling my own V3 board.

      Neither of my laptops have Bluetooth. I am aware that some of the OBDII interfaces for use with smartphones support both Bluetooth and WiFi. However, as I noted, I haven't seen a wireless interface for connection to the serial port on MS2.

      With respect to horsepower, my primary goal with the Megasquirt is to make sure that I don't make less power than with the D jet and to avoid trashing the engine. Except for improvements aimed at reliability, my engine rebuild was a stock rebuild. My conversion to Megasquirt is primarily because the D jet is no longer supported with parts. I also expect that the Megasquirt can be set up to provide smoother power delivery, better idling and better starting (really cold starts on B20E engines can be hit and miss) . If I can ultimately implement some form of knock control, that is a bonus.

      If I wanted more horsepower, it would be much cheaper and easier (notwithstanding the intake manifold - brake booster interference problem) to find an early 90's B230FT and drop it into the 140. That would give you an easy, reliable 160 - 180 hp (depending on the variant of B230FT) for a lot less dollars than trying to build a high performance B20E.

    24. #57
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      Hi Neil,

      Really nice stuff! Also one of my many project, megasquirt! I want use it for my girlfriends 144 GL which has an injection engine. But off course I have an additional challange, we use Liquid Petrol Gas as fuel. When you use a LPG installation in a car with an injection engine the entire injection is switched off. The gas is entering the engine by means of a venturi just before the throttle valve. This a a rather old fashion system. When you use megasquirt every cylinder get a gas valve with a nozzle fitted in the inlet manifiold. With such a gas injection system the engine will run much better and use less fuel. But I want to keep the original D-tronic in place and use it as back up in case you run out of LPG.
      At the moment I am busy the get a new coat of paint on that 144 but when that is ready I'll start with the megasquirt conversation.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.

    25. #58
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      Mathieu:

      Thanks!

      Dual fuel would be an interesting challenge. If you are going to maintain dual fuel capability and use injection style control for the LPG, are you going to install a second set of injectors for the LPG? I would assume that the LPG injectors are significantly different as the rail pressure must be higher. I assume that they are injecting LPG in the liquid form or do you gasify first and inject it as gas, in which case you would have completely different style injectors?

      The MS3 appears to support multiple maps and fuel types; however, I think the assumption is that the different fuel types are all delivered through the same injectors. It might be an interesting bit of coding to see if you could get it to switch between sets of injectors when you switch fuel types. Might be possible since MS3 supports sequential injection control on an 8 cylinder engine. However, probably just easier to have two separate MS2 running two separate fuel systems!

      That will be an interesting post if you get it to work!

      Neil

    26. #59
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      In late November, we had one really nice day. We didn't have any snow (that had stayed) and it was reasonably warm so I rolled the car out of the garage, washed it and gave it a quick wax job before rolling it back into the garage to be bagged up for the winter. I managed to take a few photographs after the wax job; however, the light was fading fast and the temperature was dropping equally fast, so I didn't spend a lot of time composing the shots. It was not possible to get a complete side view of the car since that would have required rolling the car right out of the garage and blocking a public roadway.







      In the last photo above, you can really notice the electric fan when it is illuminated with the flash. I may have to pull the fan out and touch it up with a low gloss black paint so it is not so obvious.

      A couple of days after the above photos, the snow came and stayed. The next photo shows the car all wrapped up in its giant ziploc bag for the winter.



      Progress will resume in April, or whenever it gets warm!
      Last edited by 142 Guy; 01-13-2014 at 05:30 PM.

    27. #60
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      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      In late November, we had one really nice day. We didn't have any snow (that had stayed) and it was reasonably warm so I rolled the car out of the garage, washed it and gave it a quick wax job before rolling it back into the garage to be bagged up for the winter. I managed to take a few photographs after the wax job; however, the light was fading fast and the temperature was dropping equally fast, so I didn't spend a lot of time composing the shots. It was not possible to get a complete side view of the car since that would have required rolling the car right out of the garage and blocking a public roadway.







      In the last photo above, you can really notice the electric fan when it is illuminated with the flash. I may have to pull the fan out and touch it up with a low gloss black paint so it is not so obvious.

      A couple of days after the above photos, the snow came and stayed. The next photo shows the car all wrapped up in its giant ziploc bag for the winter.



      Progress will resume in April, or whenever it gets warm!
      Warm? In Saskatchewan?
      '88 244 auto (parts car), '89 244 5 spd. (daily driver), '92 245 5 spd. (my car) '80 Holiday Rambler/Ford E350 (tow vehicle and track crash pad), '95 GMC K2500 (local hauler/back-up tow vehicle), '83 Mazda RX7 (race car when I have the funds), '99 Miska 20' car hauler.

      The man's prayer: "I'm a man, but I can change, ... if I have to, ... I guess."

    28. #61
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      Quote Originally Posted by John2x240 View Post
      Warm? In Saskatchewan?
      Alright - warmer. It should be warmer by April, or maybe May. Enough so that I don't have to work wearing mittens!

    29. #62
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      Hi Neil,

      Great photos, the car looks superb! Do you actually use any kind of pre-heating for the engine? When I used to live in Norway almost every car had an electrical pre-heat system on the car the heated the coolant to a temperature of 60 degree C. Yesterday I also spoke to the man that fitted a powersteering from EZ to his 1800. He just bought the kit and installed it himself. But it seems that EZ is a bit scared to sell a kit to the USA becuase of the concerns of liability in case something goes not as it should! But I deceided to go for the Corsa option, I've already ordered a little unit that will produce a fake signal that you need to get the powersteering working proper. One last question for today, why did they modify the rear of your car were the licence plate is fitted?

      Best regards,

      Mathieu.

    30. #63
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      Great photos, the car looks superb! Do you actually use any kind of pre-heating for the engine? When I used to live in Norway almost every car had an electrical pre-heat system on the car the heated the coolant to a temperature of 60 degree C. Yesterday I also spoke to the man that fitted a powersteering from EZ to his 1800. He just bought the kit and installed it himself. But it seems that EZ is a bit scared to sell a kit to the USA becuase of the concerns of liability in case something goes not as it should! But I deceided to go for the Corsa option, I've already ordered a little unit that will produce a fake signal that you need to get the powersteering working proper. One last question for today, why did they modify the rear of your car were the licence plate is fitted?

      Best regards,

      Mathieu.
      Mathieu:

      This car, along with just about every car sold in Canada, was / is equipped with a small electric heater (referred to here as block heaters) that was fitted in one of the casting plugs in the side of the engine block. I did not refit the heater as I am not planning to drive the car during the winter.

      I will be interested in seeing your steering installation with the Corsa based drive unit. As far as I can tell, EZ does not appear to be offering a 140 specific installation, although I am sure that if I was in the Netherlands and drove the car into their shop, they would probably do an install. I will email them (or the Driven Man who is the North American vendor) with an enquiry about 140 kits at a date when I am closer to considering the install. If that does not work out, I might pursue the Corsa option.

      I modified the license plate installation for two reasons. The first was that I needed to do something with the license plate light assembly as mine was chipped and cracked. The second and more significant reason is that before starting on the car, I had perused the web looking for project ideas. I had discovered a number of nice, lightly modified 140s; however, it always struck me that the license plate mounting looked like an afterthought by Volvo. Although, I admit that it was a very common style for small bumper cars designed in the '60s. A couple of years ago I attended a car show and noted the recessed license plates used on '30s vintage hot rods, particularly a lot of the Ford coupes. It was an appearance that I liked. I think that the less cluttered look is in keeping with the rest of my car since I have removed all of the emblems, the antenna and the trim along the body. Dave, who did the paint work, suggested that I remove the door handles and lock cylinders (requiring the installation of remotely controlled electric actuators) for a totally smooth look; however, I wasn't prepared to go that radical and I did not want the extra weight associated with the release actuators. If I had planned this car as a restoration, I would have retained the original style license plate mounting.

      Neil

    31. #64
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      Back from the depths of winter, sort of. After some nasty weather at the end of March (night time temperatures close to -20 C), it finally warmed up into the mid teens in early April which is warm enough that I could resume work on the car without worrying about breaking plastic parts.

      The first order of business was to complete the interior. I had the interior panels that fit under the rear vent windows re skinned to deal with some cigarette burns by the previous owner’s travelling friends.





      You can see that I had the upholstery shop fill in the holes for the ashtrays and completely skin over the panel. Re skinned panel installed on the passenger side:



      Now that the panels are installed and the interior is largely complete, I find that I have a problem with the door sill coverings. From the following photos, you can see that I have a huge gap at each end of the sill covering showing the exposed seams where the body is welded together.

      At the back of the driver’s door sill:



      At the front of the driver’s door sill:



      In the following photo, you can see that the sill covering appears to be pushed as far back as it can go and yet there is still this large gap showing the exposed body seam. Its the same on both the drivers and passengers side door openings.



      I checked in the parts manual to find if there was some trim piece that was supposed to cover this and couldn’t find anything. Is this supposed to be trimmed with windlace (the windlace around my door openings has definitely shrunk / contracted) or is it normal to have this large gap showing exposed body seam at each end of the sill cover? It has been a long time since the car was intact and I can’t remember specifics; but, I don’t recall there being these big areas of exposed body seam.

    32. #65
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      I have more interior issues!

      I took the rear view mirror out as part of the process of stripping the interior. Removal was pretty easy. You twist the mirror and it pops out of the base exposing the 3 screws which hold the base onto the roof. Twisting the mirror causes the screw in stud on the mirror proper to lift out of the hole in the base. The stud is retained in the base by two spring steel bars which grasp the stud. The two bars can just barely be seen in the picture of the base on either side of the central hole where the stud fits.





      My initial plan was, after mounting the mirror base on the roof, just to push the mirror’s retaining stud into the hole in the base and it would presumably pop into place. Ain’t happening! I could not force the stud past the two retaining spring bars. I will admit that it is not the easiest place to get any leverage to apply pressure to force the mirror into the base. I tried greasing the stud to help it slip past the two spring bars – no help. Is there some special trick to getting the stud into the base or just apply more pressure?

    33. #66
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      Are you able to get it started at all? If you are but it doesn't seat, you might try adjusting the depth of the stud. Other than that all I remember is yeah you have to push pretty hard. Also make sure the spring wires are trapped properly and aren't being blocked from spreading like they should. Worst case, maybe try biffing it with a soft hammer or one wrapped in a buffing rag and see if just a little sharper blow seats it in there.

      By the way I think this is my first time cruising this thread, and I'm bummed I didn't see it sooner. Your restoration is stunning, awesome job. A couple notes from my memory bank:

      I'm 99% sure that the edge trim around the door opening is indeed supposed to disappear under the sill trim, and that's why you have such a large gap there. That edge trim, or at least a modern replica, is widely available by the foot so you should have no problem filling that gap.

      As for putting your front speakers in those kick panel vents, take a hose and pour some water down the cowl vent, then check for moisture at the kick vents. I'm not sure but I seem to remember on at least one of my cars (might have been a 7 series) that the water that enters the cowl vent runs down there to drain, and you might end up with wet speakers and/or a water leak into the car if you put the speakers there. Maybe not, I could be remembering wrong, but I just thought I'd mention it just in case.
      2003 C70 T5M Convertible - Eibachs, Koni FSDs, Enkei RSF5s, OBX downpipe, Snabb intake, RIP kit, & drop-in intercooler, Quaife LSD, 19T, Green Giants, 22 psi Hilton tune.
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    34. #67
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      Lloyd

      I am not able to get the stud into the base at all. I will take your advice and confirm that nothing is preventing the spring wires from spreading apart. Other than that, I guess its push hard!

      I have some extra windlace. So I guess its graft it on to the end of the existing door trim to fill in the gap.

      I believe that you are correct about the kick panel vents. The fresh air does come from the cowl so they have to have some provision for drainage although I don't recall seeing a drain. I will have to grovel around under the car to have a look. I did cover the top back of the speakers with a plastic splash shield similar to what they use for door speakers to deal with water dropping down from the cowl. I will have to make sure that I have not screwed up the drainage by removal of the vent doors and that the bottom of the speakers sits above any likely water levels. Can't do the water test just yet. The mini polar vortex returned yesterday and I don't think we made it above freezing today.

    35. #68
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      Hi Neil,

      Getting that mirror in place can be a real battle! I have to check if I remeber it coorectly but I think I assembled the mirror on the base with the screw in place on the workbench and by turning the mirror I was able to reach the screws with the screwdriver. But I'll check for you later today.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.

    36. #69
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      Hi Neil,

      I had a look at the mirror of my 142 but I must have done it at another way the I desrciped it in the previous post. Stupid that I forgot how to fit a mirror! Yesterday I finaly got my 142 on the road! Now I am allowed to drive it on the road, I still like to do a few little jobs but that will be done my next leave in May.

      Regards,

      Mathieu.

    37. #70
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      Quote Originally Posted by rixt View Post
      Hi Neil,

      Yesterday I finaly got my 142 on the road!
      Regards,

      Mathieu.
      Congratulations!

      The day time high temperatures here are barely making it to 0C, so there has been no work taking place on my car.

      Neil

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