Air Conditioning A/C trouble - odd pressure readings?
Username
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    Results 1 to 27 of 27
    1. #1
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78

      Air Conditioning A/C trouble - odd pressure readings?

      I have a 2007 XC90 with a V8.

      The Air Conditioning has been working intermittently lately. My wife drives it and says that it'll work for a while, then stops. I have read many threads that state the solenoid in the compressor, or the compressor could be bad.

      I did rent a manifold gauge from Autozone and took some readings today.

      At first startup in the driveway, the A/C blew super cold and the pressure was at 40psi on the low and about 160 on the high side. The needles didn't move much. The high side fluctuated a little bit, but only about 5-10 psi. The compressor clutch stayed on all the time.

      I took it for a drive and it worked great for 10 minutes. Stopped for gas and drove back home and it didn't work. I put the gauges on when I got home and the low side was at 50psi and the high was about 400psi. What? I didn't think it would ever get that high. The car was blowing ambient air, not cold. The radiator fan was spinning at a super fast speed also.

      I opened up the high side valve in the manifold gauge for a split second and it dropped down to 300psi. Then fluctuated a bit and stabilized. I did it again and now it's back at 40psi on the low side and 200-220psi on the high side and blowing cool air again. When I did this , the radiator fan slowed down to what I would consider a normal speed. If I got the RPMs up to 1500-2000, it started blowing cold again.

      What would cause the high side to go to 400psi? Is this a solenoid problem? Compressor problem? Something clogging the system somewhere?

      I'd like to fix this myself and save money if possible, but could take it in if needed.

      Thanks.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. #2
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      I took it for another 10-15 mile drive and it worked the whole time. I shut the vehicle off half way through and the air kept working OK. It didn't seem as super cold as it did the first start of the day, but it was pretty cold.

      Edit.... I have a grill temp thermometer that I put in the center vent when the A/C was on high and it read about 50F. (after correcting the calibration based on ambient temperature)

      I got back home and the pressures are 38-40 on the low and 190-210 on the high side. Ambient temp has been 80-85 this morning.

      Any suggestions?
      Last edited by rkhanso; 06-11-2016 at 11:11 AM.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    4. #3
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Posts
      219
      Quote Originally Posted by rkhanso View Post
      I took it for another 10-15 mile drive and it worked the whole time. I shut the vehicle off half way through and the air kept working OK. It didn't seem as super cold as it did the first start of the day, but it was pretty cold.

      Edit.... I have a grill temp thermometer that I put in the center vent when the A/C was on high and it read about 50F. (after correcting the calibration based on ambient temperature)

      I got back home and the pressures are 38-40 on the low and 190-210 on the high side. Ambient temp has been 80-85 this morning.

      Any suggestions?
      Sounds like your variable displacement compressor control valve is going bad, dirty and sticking do a search here I've posted a few resolutions to this none are step by step DIY but it's really simple job- 1. evacuate the system 2. R&R valve ( 10 minutes) 3. Refill system. I'd also put a new dryer while you're at it- Also counterintuitively sine the compressor varies output, you can't really tell what the high or low is reading on these engine without the VIDA being hooked up to the CCM to monitor output voltage and duty cycle % at target temps

      I'm a BMW and Audi guy, my xc90 V8 is just for hauling football gear, photo equipment and now for towing an M3 track car and other such nonsense- Not sure what your budget is, but from experience buying an e39 M5 for anything less than 20k is going to cost you more in repairs than buying a good example to begin with. If you're looking for an E39 M5 this is one of the nicest lowest mile examples I've seen I'm still considering it it's in Denver http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/5609433730.html
      Last edited by peterz123; 06-11-2016 at 12:41 PM.

    5. Remove Advertisements
      SwedeSpeed.com
      Advertisements
       

    6. #4
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      Quote Originally Posted by peterz123 View Post
      Sounds like your variable displacement compressor control valve is going bad, dirty and sticking do a search here I've posted a few resolutions to this none are step by step DIY but it's really simple job- 1. evacuate the system 2. R&R valve ( 10 minutes) 3. Refill system. I'd also put a new dryer while you're at it- Also counterintuitively sine the compressor varies output, you can't really tell what the high or low is reading on these engine without the VIDA being hooked up to the CCM to monitor output voltage and duty cycle % at target temps

      I'm a BMW and Audi guy, my xc90 V8 is just for hauling football gear, photo equipment and now for towing an M3 track car and other such nonsense- Not sure what your budget is, but from experience buying an e39 M5 for anything less than 20k is going to cost you more in repairs than buying a good example to begin with. If you're looking for an E39 M5 this is one of the nicest lowest mile examples I've seen I'm still considering it it's in Denver http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/5609433730.html
      Thanks for the info on the Volvo and BMW.

      I just replaced the transmission fluid on the Volvo today. Now I need to get it into the shop for them to reset the ECU stuff related to that. Maybe they can check the A/C on the Vida/Dice thingy while they're at it. I just went for a drive, turned the air on high and checked the temp with my grill thermometer (not sure how accurate it is) and it's reading about 32F lower than ambient temperature (95F today). I'll have to get that A/C compressor solenoid/valve replaced.

      I think I'm leaning towards 540i as I 'think' it may have a little less cost for maint/repairs. I have found some higher mileage 540i examples that have had the timing chain guides, valley gasket, clutch, thermostat, etc replace in the last 10-20k miles. They were $5000 to $8000. More in my price range.

      That M5 sure does look nice though. And low miles. But, I'm also going to be using whatever I get as a daily driver. Not sure the M5 will be the right choice for that.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    7. #5
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Posts
      219
      Quote Originally Posted by rkhanso View Post
      Thanks for the info on the Volvo and BMW.

      I just replaced the transmission fluid on the Volvo today. Now I need to get it into the shop for them to reset the ECU stuff related to that. Maybe they can check the A/C on the Vida/Dice thingy while they're at it. I just went for a drive, turned the air on high and checked the temp with my grill thermometer (not sure how accurate it is) and it's reading about 32F lower than ambient temperature (95F today). I'll have to get that A/C compressor solenoid/valve replaced.

      I think I'm leaning towards 540i as I 'think' it may have a little less cost for maint/repairs. I have found some higher mileage 540i examples that have had the timing chain guides, valley gasket, clutch, thermostat, etc replace in the last 10-20k miles. They were $5000 to $8000. More in my price range.

      That M5 sure does look nice though. And low miles. But, I'm also going to be using whatever I get as a daily driver. Not sure the M5 will be the right choice for that.
      I'm about 90% sure it's the valve, they do work intermittently as the car heats up - mine did until it failed- here is the part # Part # 31305844 it literally takes about 10 or 15 minutes to replace the valve the evac and refill of the gas takes more time. Dealership will likely tell you to replace the whole compressor for about 1800 out the door - an indy mechanic will do it for far less. FWIW Not sure why you'd need to reset anything after a tranny fluid change, volvo procedures are sometimes pretty whacky IMO. I've done it before and never reset the fluid adaption counter and have never had an issue, the transmission adaption doesn't change in fact I removed and added almost 4 liters of new fluid when I added a transmission cooler last week and it still shifts perfectly. I understand that the TCM adapts the transmission based upon fluid temp, pressure etc and conceivably if the adaptation in the module is shifting based upon fluid at the end of its life 'shocking" it with new fluid which has better temperature properties and generated different internal pressures may cause issues
      but if the car has had previous fluid changes I don't personally see the need.

      Definitely a 540i M sport on the e39 front if that's your budget I'd look for an 03 540i M sport- that was the only year with the actual e39 M suspension parts previous "sports" were just manual tranny's and sport interior and external plastic the 03 is the peak of the e39's options and had the latest electronics and upgradability. Nice examples with paint history as you say can be had in the 6-9 k range. Daily driving an M5 is very doable but racking up the miles along with the statistical probability of an accident isn't worth it IMO- Here a nice example of what to look for albeit a bit out of your price range - https://www.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used...ting=145909727
      Last edited by peterz123; 06-11-2016 at 03:55 PM.

    8. #6
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      A question about replacing the valve in the compressor.
      If I go to a shop and have them evacuate my system, then replace the parts myself, then go back to the shop and have them fill it back up again? Or do I do that myself with some oil and R-134a?
      If a shop...how much should I expect to pay for them to do their work?
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    9. #7
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Posts
      219
      Quote Originally Posted by rkhanso View Post
      A question about replacing the valve in the compressor.
      If I go to a shop and have them evacuate my system, then replace the parts myself, then go back to the shop and have them fill it back up again? Or do I do that myself with some oil and R-134a?
      If a shop...how much should I expect to pay for them to do their work?
      I took it to the valvoline quick lube down the street from me, explained I needed it evacuated and would be back for the fill. They evacuated the system, I turned off the AC drove home replaced the valve and new dryer then drove back and they refilled it. I have a 7 passenger with rear air which takes a bit more refrigerant than the 5 passenger so make sure they look at the the sticker under the hood and put in the correct amount. I paid 79.00 at jiffylube for the vac and refill. You'll need a pair of snap ring pliers for the ring holding the valve in place there are several o rings which seal the valve a new valve should have them there is a pigtail plug which is easy to remove as well - take the skid plate off the the car and the compressor is the bottom accessory you can see the valve on the bottom of the com with our removing anything else here is what the valve looks like :

      I found my steps for this in an old post here ya go-
      1. remove metal skid plate
      2. push lower radiator hose out of the way and use a flashlight or thin shop lamp to illuminate the area and hold the hose out of the way
      2 use a long handled pair of snap ring pliers and remove the snap ring from the valve
      3. unplug the wiring harness and remove from the harness plate
      4. attach long nose vice grips to the valve or otherwise wiggle and pull it out rotating and pulling with even pressure ( there may be some remaining pressure in the system which escapes/.
      5. put new o- rings on the new valve and the large o ring in the compressor valve opening ( you'll see the old one there near the front)
      6 Insert the new valve with the connector facing harness facing towards the passenger side of the vehicle
      7 push the valve in until it seats
      8 put the snap ring back in. Valve replacement is complete
      9 Receiver dryer - there are simple write ups for the receiver dryer R&R em ail me with questions if you have them
      10 check all connections and torques
      11 refill the system, in my case 2008 V8 with rear air was 2.31 lbs filled it up, put a thermometer in the vent and took it for a spin them in the driver side vents is 46 degrees. Sweet.
      12. Replace Skid plate
      13. Drive the vehicle for a bit maybe a week or so and check the refrigerant volume to make sure there are no leaks.

      Her are images of the valve and looking up at the compressor from below at the valve aperture with the valve removed. New valve is on the right, looks like they redesigned the part a bit .


    10. #8
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      Should I add some A/C oil when replacing the receiver/drier and solenoid? If so, how much?
      I bought the receiver/drier from Rock Auto. GPD 1411916
      Last edited by rkhanso; 06-17-2016 at 09:30 AM.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    11. #9
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      Maybe just pouring out whatever oil is in the old receiver/drier into a measuring cup and then adding the same amount back into the new one is the correct procedure?
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    12. #10
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      I tipped the old receiver/drier every which way and didn't get any oil to come out of it. Not sure if I should add any oil to it, but I won't since none came out.
      Vacuuming the system now, after replacing the solenoid and receiver/drier. Fingers crossed.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    13. #11
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      Vacuumed and filled the system. I screwed up when filling it with freon - left the high side manifold gauge connected and had the valve open. I'm guessing this let refrigerant out the gauge.

      Fixed that issue and then continued to fill the system, though I suppose I can't be sure how much refrigerant is really in. I kept adding freon until I got to about 40-45psi on the low side. The high side is about 200psi.

      I put a BBQ grill thermometer in the center vent and the coldest it will read is 60F. That's when I'm driving at highway speeds. The outside temp today is about 95F.

      Is there anything I can do to get this working better? Am I ahead of the game if I just take it in and have a shop take care of it?
      Last edited by rkhanso; 06-25-2016 at 03:26 PM.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    14. #12
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jan 2012
      Posts
      219
      - these are really tricky to service with just manifold gauges also high ambient temperature will affect the fill and pressure readings bear in mind that the fill needs to be done by the prescribed weight to be correct which I why i suggest getting done with a service machine in a temperature controlled shop or jiffy lube it will also let you know if there are leaks. An incorrect fill that is slightly over will adversely affect the performance of the system - too much is a lot like too little there does not seem like there is much tolerance for inaccuracy. The receiver dryer traps moisture so water would come out not oil

    15. #13
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Jul 2015
      Location
      MN
      Posts
      78
      With the system empty, I did the calculations and came up with it needing 37 ounces of freon. I bought 12 oz cans and thought that if I just put 3 cans in, that'd be close enough and I'd be OK. Well, that idea was messed up because I left the high side valve open and probably lost some freon out because of that.

      The air in the vent was down to about 55F today when the temperature was much cooler and less humid than yesterday. I think it was in the 80s today instead of 90s. It still does not get quite as cold as it used to, however.

      I may have to just take it in.
      2007 Volvo XC90 V8
      2001 BMW 540i with 6-sp manual transmission. Awesome car!
      1999 Saab 93 - SOLD

    16. #14
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Sep 2016
      Location
      SF Bay Area (Modesto, CA)
      Posts
      9
      Quote Originally Posted by peterz123 View Post
      I took it to the valvoline quick lube down the street from me, explained I needed it evacuated and would be back for the fill. They evacuated the system, I turned off the AC drove home replaced the valve and new dryer then drove back and they refilled it. I have a 7 passenger with rear air which takes a bit more refrigerant than the 5 passenger so make sure they look at the the sticker under the hood and put in the correct amount. I paid 79.00 at jiffylube for the vac and refill. You'll need a pair of snap ring pliers for the ring holding the valve in place there are several o rings which seal the valve a new valve should have them there is a pigtail plug which is easy to remove as well - take the skid plate off the the car and the compressor is the bottom accessory you can see the valve on the bottom of the com with our removing anything else here is what the valve looks like :

      I found my steps for this in an old post here ya go-
      1. remove metal skid plate
      2. push lower radiator hose out of the way and use a flashlight or thin shop lamp to illuminate the area and hold the hose out of the way
      2 use a long handled pair of snap ring pliers and remove the snap ring from the valve
      3. unplug the wiring harness and remove from the harness plate
      4. attach long nose vice grips to the valve or otherwise wiggle and pull it out rotating and pulling with even pressure ( there may be some remaining pressure in the system which escapes/.
      5. put new o- rings on the new valve and the large o ring in the compressor valve opening ( you'll see the old one there near the front)
      6 Insert the new valve with the connector facing harness facing towards the passenger side of the vehicle
      7 push the valve in until it seats
      8 put the snap ring back in. Valve replacement is complete
      9 Receiver dryer - there are simple write ups for the receiver dryer R&R em ail me with questions if you have them
      10 check all connections and torques
      11 refill the system, in my case 2008 V8 with rear air was 2.31 lbs filled it up, put a thermometer in the vent and took it for a spin them in the driver side vents is 46 degrees. Sweet.
      12. Replace Skid plate
      13. Drive the vehicle for a bit maybe a week or so and check the refrigerant volume to make sure there are no leaks.

      2008 V8 Sport with similar AC issue. Pressure would spike before dropping down. It would take a while to start feeling cool (up to 10 minutes), but never getting cold.

      First try: Took it to the shop, it had over 2.5 lbs of refrigerant. They removed some so the new amount was 2.3 lbs. Started getting cool air sooner, but still not cold.
      Shop quoted me $1400 to replace the compressor and drier.

      Instead, I tried the compressor control valve and receiver drier and it seems to have worked. I can't tell yet, because it's only 75 degrees outside, but it definitely started cooling a lot quicker and seems to be colder.

      Got both parts from FCP Euro for $185 delivered (OEM valve, ACM drier).

      Followed instructions above, and they were very helpful (very nice write-up). Here are few things I would add from my experience. Make sure you remove all the refrigerant before you begin.

      1. skid plate: there are a total of 6 bolts on mine. i had to attach a pipe to the wrench handle to get enough leverage to get the bolts off. then it was just a matter of pushing the front portion up to dislodge and then wiggling and forcing the plate forward against the bumper to be able to slide it out.

      2. Make sure you have either very short or very long "internal" snap ring pliers. Anything else, you're wasting time. It's a very tight spot to get to the snap ring that holds the valve in place, so you either have to reach from outside with long snap ring pliers or get behind the radiator hose with very short ones. The main problem is the radiator hose. Maybe you can rotate the snap ring to a better position so you can have an easier time with it (I didn't realize that until after).
      After trying snap ring pliers of different lengths and wasting time, I ended up bending the handles on a short one to make it ever shorter. Finally, I succeeded in getting the ring off.

      3. There's a screw holding the valve wire to the compressor with a clamp. It's easier if you remove this screw first. This screw holds more than one thing, so just remember how it all goes together.

      4. I put the "L" ends (90 degrees) on the snap ring pliers, which allowed me to latch them on the the indents on valve (look at the black part of the new valve, you'll see what i mean). Then it easily pulled out, the remaining pressure pretty much did the work; I just had to pull a little.

      5. the hardest part was getting the old large o ring from the opening. I used a needle point to grab it and pull it out.

      6. my old valve wire was facing down, so I put the new one the same way.

      The rest was pretty straight forward.

      For the receiver drier, it looks more complicated than it is.
      -Remove the passenger headlight.
      -Then disconnect the wire toward the bottom of the drier.
      -Use the holes on the new drier to figure out where the screws are. If I remember correctly, I think there are a total of 3 screws. One on the front, one one the back, and one on the bottom. They're all different sizes and types. So make sure you have the right tools before you begin. The bottom screw is a large torx, maybe T27?
      -After you get all the screws off, pull the plastic shield out of way, and it should just pull up and out. Transfer the connector from the bottom of the old drier to the new one with new o rings if you have them (mine didn't come with them). Then transfer the screw clamp from the old drier to the new one.
      -Put everything back and connect the wire. Put the headlight back.

      Put the Skid plate back (required some wiggling and pushing the bumper cover quite a bit, but it did go into place).

      Pressure tested and refilled at the shop ($89).
      Already feeling colder with ambient 75, but I will test later today in 90 degree weather.
      Last edited by sathans; 07-03-2017 at 02:09 PM.
      2008 XC90 AWD V8 Sport

    17. #15
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2005
      Location
      Seattle
      Posts
      2,617
      Very cool, will book this one for future reference. Thanks for the update!
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 198k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 127k

    18. #16
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Portland, Oregon
      Posts
      19
      Okay, so I am having a similar, but slightly different problem and I have a few questions:
      -first, my A/C (on an 07 V8) will be pretty weak (ambient temp), then will decide at some random time to start putting out cooler air. Note that I said "cooler". It's not cold really... just cool. What's slightly different (than the experiences above) is that I cannot see a clear correlation to it blowing cold after the car has been sitting (and is presumably cool). e.g. Sometimes it will simply decide to on the interstate after it's been running for 30 minutes or an hour. It does not seem to be cold immediately on startup. Does this sound like it could be compressor control valve? For what it's worth, it's gotten progressively worse over the last month... from being an occasional problem, to being more frequent, to now not really working at all.

      -Second: Not to ask a stupid question, but where is the high side valve? I have a manifold set and would like to check the readings (even though I know it might not help indicate the bad compressor valve) Can someone tell me where the heck the high side valve is?

      -third: I measured the low side with a cheapie gauge that came with an r134a bottle. It measures way high for the low side. As in: way into the red. This was with the AC switch turned up to max, but I am not absolutely certain that the clutch was engaged. (esp per Peter's statement that you cannot visually tell that the clutch is engaged). So the question is this: What (if anything) is the significance of the low side being so high? Is this an indicator in any way of the compressor valve problem? Is a low side reading indciative of anything at all if the compressor is not running? and yes, I know that it might mean that it is actually overcharged, but we've had this car only about 3 months, so I don't know if it was ever overcharged previously or not.

      thanks, all!
      dan
      Last edited by drsides; 07-12-2017 at 05:50 PM.

    19. #17
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Dec 2009
      Location
      Denver, CO
      Posts
      62
      @drsides Yes, this sounds to be the control valve. Inconsistency is the key. These valves stick which can cause all sorts of things to go wrong. Gauges don't really help you with diagnosing these cars since they don't always move the same amount of refrigerant all the time. Just because the high side is really high doesn't mean it is overfilled, it could mean that the valve is sending too much refrigerant through the system than the ambient temp calls for.

      As for the high port location, it is on the top of the receiver/dryer in front of the radiator (passenger side).
      2009 S80 V8 Executive Electric Silver/Sandstone Beige
      2007 XC90 V8 Savile Grey/Anthracite Black

      Previous Vehicles 2004 XC90 2.5T, 2003 XC70

    20. #18
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Portland, Oregon
      Posts
      19
      [QUOTE=percavman;5651985 Just because the high side is really high doesn't mean it is overfilled,QUOTE]
      Great info. Thanks so much. But to be clear, did you mean the LOW side being really high? (That is what I was asking about).

      thanks all! This is great to hear all of this information. I feel like I know what I need to do now. Now I just need to find the best price on the control valve and drier!

      In a related note: It's so nice to be in an automotive forum where people are polite, helpful and respectful of one another. Other forums that I've joined can be technical, but can be infected with sarcasm and even name calling. It's very nice to be on a forum where one can ask questions without fear of being mocked.

    21. #19
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Dec 2009
      Location
      Denver, CO
      Posts
      62
      Yes, high pressure readings on the pressure (low) side indicate a compressor issue (e.g. valve).

      I am just glad to help however I can. Welcome to the forums and enjoy your Volvo!
      Last edited by percavman; 07-13-2017 at 02:34 PM.
      2009 S80 V8 Executive Electric Silver/Sandstone Beige
      2007 XC90 V8 Savile Grey/Anthracite Black

      Previous Vehicles 2004 XC90 2.5T, 2003 XC70

    22. #20
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Sep 2016
      Location
      SF Bay Area (Modesto, CA)
      Posts
      9
      [QUOTE=drsides;5652745]
      Quote Originally Posted by percavman;5651985 Just because the high side is really high doesn't mean it is overfilled,QUOTE
      Great info. Thanks so much. But to be clear, did you mean the LOW side being really high? (That is what I was asking about).
      My low side would spike really high initially (60+) and then drop down to 30-40 and My guess is that's when it started to blow cool air (took up to 10 minutes).

      After changing the valve and receiver dryer, it's working great. Cold air within seconds. We took a 500 mile trip driving between 60 and 110 degree weather and the AC never faulted. The wife never wanted to ride in the XC before because it was always hot. On this trip, she had to turn on the seat heater in 100 degree weather because the AC was too cold... imagine that!
      2008 XC90 AWD V8 Sport

    23. #21
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Portland, Oregon
      Posts
      19
      Got the parts (receiver/drier and compressor valve) from fcpeuro yesterday. Plan to do the install on Saturday!

    24. #22
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Portland, Oregon
      Posts
      19
      Quote Originally Posted by sathans View Post
      2008 V8 Sport with similar AC issue. Pressure would spike before dropping down. It would take a while to start feeling cool (up to 10 minutes), but never getting cold.

      First try: Took it to the shop, it had over 2.5 lbs of refrigerant. They removed some so the new amount was 2.3 lbs. Started getting cool air sooner, but still not cold.
      Shop quoted me $1400 to replace the compressor and drier.

      Instead, I tried the compressor control valve and receiver drier and it seems to have worked. I can't tell yet, because it's only 75 degrees outside, but it definitely started cooling a lot quicker and seems to be colder.

      Got both parts from FCP Euro for $185 delivered (OEM valve, ACM drier).

      Followed instructions above, and they were very helpful (very nice write-up). Here are few things I would add from my experience. Make sure you remove all the refrigerant before you begin.

      1. skid plate: there are a total of 6 bolts on mine. i had to attach a pipe to the wrench handle to get enough leverage to get the bolts off. then it was just a matter of pushing the front portion up to dislodge and then wiggling and forcing the plate forward against the bumper to be able to slide it out.

      2. Make sure you have either very short or very long "internal" snap ring pliers. Anything else, you're wasting time. It's a very tight spot to get to the snap ring that holds the valve in place, so you either have to reach from outside with long snap ring pliers or get behind the radiator hose with very short ones. The main problem is the radiator hose. Maybe you can rotate the snap ring to a better position so you can have an easier time with it (I didn't realize that until after).
      After trying snap ring pliers of different lengths and wasting time, I ended up bending the handles on a short one to make it ever shorter. Finally, I succeeded in getting the ring off.

      3. There's a screw holding the valve wire to the compressor with a clamp. It's easier if you remove this screw first. This screw holds more than one thing, so just remember how it all goes together.

      4. I put the "L" ends (90 degrees) on the snap ring pliers, which allowed me to latch them on the the indents on valve (look at the black part of the new valve, you'll see what i mean). Then it easily pulled out, the remaining pressure pretty much did the work; I just had to pull a little.

      5. the hardest part was getting the old large o ring from the opening. I used a needle point to grab it and pull it out.

      6. my old valve wire was facing down, so I put the new one the same way.

      The rest was pretty straight forward.

      For the receiver drier, it looks more complicated than it is.
      -Remove the passenger headlight.
      -Then disconnect the wire toward the bottom of the drier.
      -Use the holes on the new drier to figure out where the screws are. If I remember correctly, I think there are a total of 3 screws. One on the front, one one the back, and one on the bottom. They're all different sizes and types. So make sure you have the right tools before you begin. The bottom screw is a large torx, maybe T27?
      -After you get all the screws off, pull the plastic shield out of way, and it should just pull up and out. Transfer the connector from the bottom of the old drier to the new one with new o rings if you have them (mine didn't come with them). Then transfer the screw clamp from the old drier to the new one.
      -Put everything back and connect the wire. Put the headlight back.

      Put the Skid plate back (required some wiggling and pushing the bumper cover quite a bit, but it did go into place).

      Pressure tested and refilled at the shop ($89).
      Already feeling colder with ambient 75, but I will test later today in 90 degree weather.
      I am half way through this job and have a few thoughts to this:
      -first, I went through 3 different snap ring pliers and none of them worked... even ones that were called "long handle". Most brick and mortar establishments only sell one snap ring plier set, and the average set will not work. Sears had the most, but even their "long handle" ones were not narrow enough at the right spot. I finally got these from amazon and they worked great. Save yourself some pain, and just order these.
      -There can still be quite a bit of pressure in the system even after having it evacuated. I had mine evacuated at a local Valvoline oil change place and the guy seemed to be taking the time to do it right... but even after that, the valve shot out when I was wiggling it out. Lesson: wear safety glasses when getting the old valve out.
      -The screw mentioned above in #3 is in really, really tight on my car. I cannot get it out. Not sure how I will resolve this (like i said, i am only half way through this). Might have to use zip ties or something like that to secure he wire.
      -You will need a small, flat blade screw driver to pry up the back to undo the connector. It's not at all obvious how it works from looking at the new part. I found it easier to remove the connector from the mount so that I could look at the back to see where and how to pry the back.
      -This might sound stupid, but make sure that you undo the METAL skid plate.. NOT the large plastic splash guard. The large plastic splash guard is farther back. The skid place is farther forward and is mounted via two arms that extend under the truck. Each arm is mounted with 3 bolts. One of them is mounted in a recessed part of the arm, so is not obvious. Took me a while to find it.
      Last edited by drsides; 08-13-2017 at 04:55 PM.

    25. #23
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Mar 2017
      Location
      Portland, Oregon
      Posts
      19
      So I finally got mine completed and am happy to say that it fixed the problem. Total cost to me was about $185 for the compressor valve and receiver/drier, $33 for the long handle snap ring pliers from Amazon and $140 from Oil Can Henry's (like jiffy lube) to put 2.3 lbs of r134a back in the system.

      Again, I would strongly recommend buying these pliers from amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1. I looked in 3 different brick and mortar stores including sears tool dept and harbor freight and none of them had snap ring pliers that were long enough. I know. I tried (and returned) 3 different pairs before getting these from amazon.

      Quote Originally Posted by sathans View Post
      For the receiver drier, it looks more complicated than it is.
      1 -Remove the passenger headlight.
      2 -Then disconnect the wire toward the bottom of the drier.
      3 -Use the holes on the new drier to figure out where the screws are. If I remember correctly, I think there are a total of 3 screws. One on the front, one one the back, and one on the bottom. They're all different sizes and types. So make sure you have the right tools before you begin. The bottom screw is a large torx, maybe T27?
      4 -After you get all the screws off, pull the plastic shield out of way, and it should just pull up and out. Transfer the connector from the bottom of the old drier to the new one with new o rings if you have them (mine didn't come with them). Then transfer the screw clamp from the old drier to the new one.
      5 -Put everything back and connect the wire. Put the headlight back.

      Put the Skid plate back (required some wiggling and pushing the bumper cover quite a bit, but it did go into place).

      Pressure tested and refilled at the shop ($89).
      Already feeling colder with ambient 75, but I will test later today in 90 degree weather.
      All that said, I thought that I would mention that doing the receiver drier really isn't hard, but it takes some figuring out how to do it. So a few comments to build on what was mentioned in the instructions above:
      For #1, the reason for removing the headlight is to get to the middle bolt. It was not obvious to me at all why this was required until I actually tried to figure out where all the R/D bolts are.
      for #2, The electrical connector requires that you squeeze in on the wire spring connector as you pull it off. i.e. Squeeze and wiggle and pull. Again, obvious in retrospect.
      For #3, Yes, there are three screws. The top one is T20. The middle one is the one that you have get to through the passenger's side headlight space. You will need a box end or open end wrench for this. I used a 5/16" ratcheting box end (probably ~13mm) and it worked perfectly for the job. The bottom one is the most mysterious. It is a T40 and access is literally from the bottom. That is, you will not be able to see it unless you are laying on your back looking up at the bottom of the R/D. I The bolt actually goes vertically up through a piece of block aluminum to screw into the R/D.
      For #4- Not much to say on #4. once you get all the bolts out, you should be able to wiggle it loose after getting the plastic shield out of the way.
      For #5- I would suggest that you start with the top bolt, then middle, then bottom. But do not tighten any of them until all of them are all in place. That is, work from top to bottom to get them in place, then go back through, top to bottom to snug them in place. Otherwise it might be hard to get the top bolt screwed in.
      For #6.. nothing to say on that. It goes back together pretty easily.

      dan

    26. #24
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Aug 2017
      Posts
      1
      2009 xc90 3.2, compressor control valve solution worked, thanks guys!

      Symptoms: slow to cool AC, finally started working after about 10 minutes on the highway, generally cooled ok after that. Hooked the gauge up to the high/low valves, showing around 70psi on the low side, 150psi on the high side, also had both schrader valves leaking slowly.

      Started thinking restriction on the low side in the thermal expansion valve or the drier, but I didn't bother. It was the CCV 100% thanks to this forum.

      Replaced the CCV, ordered through local parts store paid $110 out the door, BE AWARE that you need the CCV with the pig tail wires coming from it for the 3.2 xc90, not the CCV that looks like it receives the wires. For some reason both designs came up under the same part number identified earlier in this thread.
      Three 12oz cans of freon topped me up to 2.25lbs, however I have the rear AC option and I think I need to add a little more for the 2.9lbs that is listed in the manual, I missed that in my first read through. Also, believe the snap ring pliers complaints, the stubbier the handles the better lol!

      FIXED: Now down to 35psi low side and around 175-200psi high side and cold as you like in south Texas summer heat.

    27. #25
      Member RedGeminiPA's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 2013
      Location
      Altoona, PA
      Posts
      1,101
      It appears the valve part number is for 2007 and up. Is this a possible problem for the 2006? Mine's slow to cool, and doesn't exactly get cold all the time. What would be the correct part number for 2006, if this applies?
      2006 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, Touring, Convenience and RSE. Silver w/ Graphite
      2014 Lincoln MKT EcoBoost Elite, Tech, Pano, 20”, Rear Captains. Pearl/Black
      Past: 2008 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, BLIS, Dynaudio, Bi-Xenon. Ember black w/ Sandstone
      2004 XC90 2.5T AWD 7-Passenger w/ Climate, Premium and Versatility packages and Xenon headlights.

    28. #26
      Junior Member
      Join Date
      Sep 2016
      Location
      SF Bay Area (Modesto, CA)
      Posts
      9
      All valid points. I'm glad it worked.
      Combined, this would make a pretty comprehensive write up.
      2008 XC90 AWD V8 Sport

    29. #27
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2005
      Location
      Seattle
      Posts
      2,617
      Update to an older post, someone on MVS had a solenoid fail and did a write-up, more the merrier I think as this problem may become more prevalent over time- https://www.matthewsvolvosite.com/fo...p?f=10&t=86206
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 198k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 127k

    30. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements