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    1. #71
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      After the paint was stripped off of all of the control arms and other associated parts of the front end that were being rebuilt the parts were then soaked in a liquid rust remover. We don't sand blast suspension parts here in the shop as the surface of the metal gets hardened during the process and could contribute to cracks forming in the future.

      Following priming, new OEM lower control bushings are pressed into place. The top photo shows one side of a control arm supported by a 1-9/16" socket than is larger than the OD of the bushing, and longer than it so as not to bottom out while the bushing being pressed into place.

      The press is a sixty-plus year old arbor press attached to the side of our hydraulic press. It has a 2.5-inch dia. ram and the 2.5' handle has been replaced by a 5' long heat treated solid steel cheater handle. This heavy-duty press will exert about a maximum of ten tons of force and all of it was needed to push these bushings into place. The bushings were removed with the hydraulic press because more force was needed to get them out.

      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

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    3. #72
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      BUMP - anyone here willing to take a few minutes and help w/these dimensions? Thanking you in advance if you will.

      Preparing to make a new two-piece plywood package tray for the '67 1800s. Looking for someone who may have an original or a reproduced tray of the correct sizes for dimensions. I need the exact length and width of the two wooden pieces, #59 in the drawing.

      Also looking for one bracket with caged nuts as shown in the photo below of a 1800E coupe showing one on both sides. These pieces appear to be the same from the beginning of the 1800s production run and up on thru to the last 1800E coupes.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 04-08-2018 at 01:08 PM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    4. #73
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      Thanks to Ian at Hi-Performance Auto Service the measurements of the two wooden pieces that make up the package tray behind the rear seat over the rear axle are now known. A friend from the mid-west is sending along the two brackets in the photo above that locate and secure the top piece of the tray.

      Cutting the new wooden pieces will be done later in the month when another friend, an ex Volvo mechanic I used to work with at an independent Volvo repair shop, now a cabinet maker will be here to do some work on the shop building.



      The new original size shelf will take the place of the taller than original existing one. This 1800S amazing has all of its original carpets that are in very good condition and have been re-dyed in the past. That includes the carpet that covers the tray but was mounted upside down on the replacement tray that is in the car now. The gray section of it visible thru the rear window will be dyed to match, and the original edge binding will be sewn back onto it.

      The original optional AM-FM radio below was installed by the Volvo dealer or at the port of entry. I had the buttons and the sliding bar above it re-plated, and then the radio was cleaned, rebuilt, re-wired, and aligned by an old car radio restorer. The radio will be connected to either the original speaker and the grille seen on the shelf in the middle, or the rare, German Blaupunkt speaker and enclosure on the left will make up a nice period sound system.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 04-11-2018 at 07:22 PM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

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    6. #74
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      Earlier this year I contacted the Volvo Historic Archive to get a copy of the information above on this car from the list of 1800 series cars produced. When the info arrived it was great to learn that it still retained both its original engine and gearbox which means this is a matching number 1800s. This information is important to serious collectors, and purists.

      Have been planning on a power increase in the future by using either the Judson supercharger or the Volvo Competition Service intake manifolds shown earlier in this thread with a set of vintage Weber carbs.

      The 1967 and '68 1800s cars were fitted with a 10:1 to 1 CR and are the most powerful B18 engines made and produce 115 hp, which is only 3 hp less the bigger 1969 B20 engine.

      Learning this info about the matching numbers while the shop lathe was tooled up to machine valve guides for a customers engine, I decided to keep going and make a set of B18 to B20 conversion valve guides for the original head. Did the same thing for the 122s valves last year that worked out very well.



      The B18 cast iron conversion guides (bronze is not needed in this application, and really is only necessary for racing applications) for B20 valves have a .312-inch (5/16″) ID diameter bore for the stems that are hard chromed and are smaller than the original .343-inch (11/32″) stems which improves air flow in the port. The end of the intake guides that protrude into the port have also been tapered for better air and fuel flow. The top end of the guides were machined for modern B20 valve seals instead of the old-fashioned an inefficient umbrella seals used on the B18. The reamed guide id's were finished off with a finely honed surface in a Sunnen honing machine.

      The new B20 exhaust and intake valves and guides are in the center of the photo above shown in comparison to the original B18 guides and valves on the left and the right. The dark spots near the valve head will disappear after a second blending angle is cut on the back side of the valve head for improved flow, after valve seats have been installed in the head.

      Both sides of the valve heads and the end of the stem where it meets the head have been lightened somewhat (compare them to an untouched valve below) by machining the two sides in the lathe and tuliping the head, and then swirl polishing both. The 42MM B20 intake valve heads have been turned down to 41MM which is larger than the original 40MM B18 intake valve heads. B18 and B20 exhaust valve heads are both the same size.



      Also had CP-Carrillo machine another set (have a set in the 122s) of forged .030 over pistons that have a zero deck height, an offset pin, and machined pin sides and interior for lightness. Used with a Cometic gasket, the combustion chamber will have a .032-inch squish band that with the larger over bore will raise the compression ratio to about 10:25. The addition of the valves, guides, pistons and a more aggressive cam should produce about 130-140 hp with the VCS manifolds and Webers or around 150-160 hp with the Judson supercharger.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 04-22-2018 at 08:15 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    7. #75
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      Over the winter the set of 40 DCOE vintage Webers picked up along w/a set of 45 DCOEs last fall were taken apart, cleaned and inspected to see if rebuilding them was an option. The progression holes are the same on both carbs, there is no warpage anywhere and rebuilding them in the future should be easy.

      Also mocked up the Webers on a set of Volvo Competition Department manifolds with a set of Swedish rubber mount/gaskets and Cosworth rubber vibration damping donuts and washers to see if the VCS air cleaner will clear the wheel well. It just clears, but it is too close so we will either fabricate a narrower filter element or have one made. The combo will however fit a 122s as is. A brace to the engine needs to be fabricated to position the rubber soft mount on the outside of the inner air cleaner half. The mount is visible between the carb throats and is inside of a clamp riveted to the inner housing.

      These manifolds are for B20 engines and the ID is .250" to large for a road-going B18 engine. We can reduce the bore size of the runners in CAD and molds can be printed from this and can be used to pour an epoxy blend around them. This epoxy offers chemical resistance to gasoline, jet fuel, and alcohol and is used by NASA.

      The original to the car 115 hp B18B engine with 10.0:1 CR will stay in the car, it is only three hp shy of the larger B20B 118 hp engine, first produced in 1969.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 04-22-2018 at 08:12 PM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    8. #76
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      For those of you that are trying to come up w/the correct color paint for your as built pre-1970s 1800s check out these photos. This is an original spare wheel and tire for the 1800s and the paint is not the bright silver seen on most wheels today, it is a somewhat more subdued and darker semi-gloss silver with a very slight bluish cast. This is an original 1800s wheel and Pirelli Cinturato spare tire that the pre-1970 cars were delivered with when new. Sorry, but I can't help with the paint formula itself. Anyone know what the yellow inspection spot denotes?

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 06-22-2018 at 11:45 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    9. #77
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      judson supercharger

      hi, I am interested in purchasing your Judson supercharger. do you want to sell it? thanks, Rick [email protected]

    10. #78
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      Spring has finally arrived here this week and this is a quick update for today: The upper and lower control arms and all of the re-used front suspension pieces have had the original paint removed in the shop 5-gallon Safety-Kleen carburetor cleaner machine powered by an agitator.

      Following the stripping the very small amount surface rust on the pieces was removed with chemical rust removers. Suspension pieces, coil springs or any highly stressed components should not be abrasive-blasted as the process surface-hardens the metal which can cause cracks to form in the future.

      All of the pieces were painted here in the shop spray booth with an epoxy primer and a two-part urethane satin-finish similar to the original coating. The car is used often in the good weather months, and no effort was made to have a perfect finish, only to preserve the parts as the car has to be driven on gravel roads every time it goes out.

      The lower control arms have already been painted, re-bushed, and installed, most of the rest of the parts that include new ball joints, steering arms, and new ball joints, steering arms, and tie rod ends will be assembled this weekend.
      Last edited by vintagewrench; 05-05-2018 at 03:48 PM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    11. #79
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      Out of curiosity, what were you using for the chemical removal of the rust? All of the acid based rust removers suffer from the risk of hydrogen embrittlement. The chelating rust removers claim to be immune to this problem; but, I have never seen a description of the chemical reaction that they use to remove the rust.

      As an observation, correct selection of the abrasive and the blasting procedure can minimize / eliminate the surface work hardening problem. However, finding somebody schooled in the correct use of the softer abrasives can be a problem and they are probably better used for the removal of lighter surface rust.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    12. #80
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      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      Out of curiosity, what were you using for the chemical removal of the rust? All of the acid based rust removers suffer from the risk of hydrogen embrittlement. The chelating rust removers claim to be immune to this problem; but, I have never seen a description of the chemical reaction that they use to remove the rust.

      As an observation, correct selection of the abrasive and the blasting procedure can minimize / eliminate the surface work hardening problem. However, finding somebody schooled in the correct use of the softer abrasives can be a problem and they are probably better used for the removal of lighter surface rust.
      Here in the shop we use Evapo-Rust which is non-chelating solution and works quite well. If an old vehicle comes into the shop for a mechanical rebuild and has a lot of surface rust on its components we mix up a batch of molasses and water in a big plastic drum and use that for bigger pieces. One of the best things about soaking parts in rust removers is very little labor is involved and the electricity and expense to run the 10-hp air compressor for blasting is not needed. It is also biodegradable.

      Have tried many different types of media over the years in our blast cabinet, even walnut shells. Some of them will take rust off, but progress is very, very slow and is usually only suited to small pieces due to the cost of the labor involved. Most these types of media are more suitable for non-ferrous metals.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    13. #81
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      Evapo Rust is a 'selective' (Evapo Rust's description) chelating rust removal agent. I have heard about molasses rust removal; but, have never really investigated the chemistry other than to have it described as a chelating reaction. The proof might be if the end product of the molasses rust cleaning was an iron sulphate compound, then it also is likely a chelating reaction.

      Since the little 0.5 litre containers of molasses in the grocery store are selling for around $4 Cdn, I expect that you are using the unrefined stuff from a feed store? My agri business buddy described an improperly sealed container going 'off' (fermenting), somewhat pungent. Since the molasses reaction is rather slow, how do you manage the risk associated with the molasses starting to ferment before the job is done, or has that not been an issue?
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    14. #82
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      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      Evapo Rust is a 'selective' (Evapo Rust's description) chelating rust removal agent. I have heard about molasses rust removal; but, have never really investigated the chemistry other than to have it described as a chelating reaction. The proof might be if the end product of the molasses rust cleaning was an iron sulphate compound, then it also is likely a chelating reaction.

      Since the little 0.5 litre containers of molasses in the grocery store are selling for around $4 Cdn, I expect that you are using the unrefined stuff from a feed store? My agri business buddy described an improperly sealed container going 'off' (fermenting), somewhat pungent. Since the molasses reaction is rather slow, how do you manage the risk associated with the molasses starting to ferment before the job is done, or has that not been an issue?
      142 Guy: Yes I buy it by the pound and if it sits to long it does cause an odor. We keep it in a different room from the main shop so the smell really isn't an issue.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    15. #83
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      Robo Volvo: We decided to have a little evening fun recently while reassembling the front end during a rebuild.

      Photo #1 checking the camber.



      Photo #2 setting the toe-in.



      Photo # 3 checking the caster.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    16. #84
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      The 1967 1800S covered 275 trouble free miles after being put back on the road for the season and driven on Friday, Sunday, and Monday. In the off season the front axle and front brakes, were rebuilt and restored.

      The crossmember and welds are in excellent condition w/out cracks and the original paint on the front and rear was cleaned up and left as original because the car has newer suffered from any rust ever.

      All the control arms were re-bushed, and new ball joints, tie rod ends and outer steering arms were installed.



      The ends of the crossmember which get sandblasted by the wheels were repainted. The shock mounts were reinforced with carbon steel stampings I used to manufacture and sell (may have another run of stampings done from the dies and sell them once again.)



      The calipers had been split and rebuilt a few years ago with new old stock Volvo pistons and only needed to be cleaned. The uncut original rotors only have a max of .005" runout and only needed cleaning and repainting. New nickel-copper lines replaced the original ones to the calipers.

      Learned from other mechanics and drivers that run newer cars (post-WWII) at vintage races I work at and also drive in some of the time that EBC yellow racing pads made in the UK work extremely well. Also the EBC Green Stuff kevlar pads work better than most on the street and offer 15% more stopping power. Have been using them for a while and they work super well.

      For this car the green paint was cleaned, scuffed up, the faces of the pads masked and the sides and steel backing was painted w/heat resistant black paint. After the break-in-period was over the car ended up having the best stopping power of any of the 122s and 1800s cars that I have owned and driven over the years.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 06-15-2018 at 07:18 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    17. #85
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      Eight days on the road as a daily driver and over 500 miles later the '67 1800s is doing quite well for itself and has been a pleasure to drive.

      Two non-Volvo components have failed over that period:

      The three or four-year-old Interstate battery the previous owner installed died due to a bad cell (I was able to bump start it and make it back to the shop.) It was early on a Sunday evening and all the parts stores were closed.

      The only batteries kicking around in the shop were 6V units and this small 450 cranking amp Optima. It was installed in a 1914 Mercer Raceabout just before I shipped to Monterey, CA in 2012 for the Pebble Beach Concours and the Montery Historic races and used only for the two events for a client. When the car was shipped back it was pickled and stored. The battery was only used for one more race meet in 2013 in 1914 Duesenberg racing car and since then has been sitting around and now presumed to be DOA.

      It checked out to still have 12.6 volts in it so it was put in the car, which then amazingly started right up, and after a charge has been in service. Have been using these batteries for years on clients cars and never cease to be impressed with the staying power and long life that Optima packs into them. Please EXCUSE the bungee cords - will make up some shorter J-hooks for the holder, tidy things up a bit and use this battery for the rest of the season.



      The right angle speedo drive on the back of the OD was missing when the car was purchased last year and this repro unit was just added to replace it. Only 375-miles later the knurled end on the tube and drive connection to the trans and the die-cast body that houses the gear set parted company due to not having a tight enough press fit at the connection. There was some slack in the cable when it was installed so the failure was not caused by the cable pulling on it.

      When it fell off and started bouncing on the road, the driveshaft and dragging, it sounded like a small bell going on and off repeatedly, and I was able to quickly pull over to see what the problem was. The angled section and the cable were found laying on the ground under the car. Just the cable itself was reinstalled to keep oil from leaking out and a good original unit will be installed when one is found.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    18. #86
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      Meanwhile after a four-wheel alignment, 1150 miles of Vermont paved and gravel roads, dust, dirt, raindrops, and more than a few perished bugs later…….it was a delightful drive and most of everything is working well. It then enjoyed a good wash and wax.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    19. #87
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      Was able to get another smaller job almost finished over the weekend. The previous owner of the 1800s had removed the original package tray and rear seat backing and replaced it with a taller one to showcase a set of speakers for an added sound system.

      After getting the original Volvo optional AM-FM mono radio rebuilt and restored, a correct new plywood rear seat back and package tray was in order. Using the original carpet that covers this area and a scaled drawing with dimensions supplied thanks to chrsvo a member of the UK Volvo Club Forum I was able to convert the measurements into inch size and fab the two pieces out of the correct-sized 3/8" thick plywood.

      The photo shows it installed in place to check the fit. Two machine screws hold and locate the bottom piece in place on two brackets and on either side are four wood nuts that the folding seat back hinges attach to. The top piece is held in place by four machine screws and the chromed pieces that hold the leather luggage straps used when the seat back is down attach to a pair of brackets w/caged nuts are under this piece of wood.

      A few details still need finishing and at this point either a rare period Blaupunkt speaker and housing, or the original Volvo speaker and the grille seen on the top will be used. The car still has all of its original carpeting in good condition and the piece that covers this will be re-installed.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    20. #88
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      Haven't posted for a while because of a decision to use all of my spare time to get the 1800s ready for its first competition event. All of the work over the winter and spring is now paying off.

      I'm a member of the Vintage Sports Car Club of America (VSCCA) https://www.vscca.org and entered and drove The Old Motor Volvo 1800s in the 2018 VSCCA Mt Equinox Hill Climb held on August 11 & 12th, 2018.

      Got in 11 timed runs over the weekend up the challenging access road that is 5.2 miles long and climbs to 3140 feet over the distance, has 40 turns and 20 switchbacks and the average grade is a quite steep at 12% and many of the switchbacks and the steeper areas are 30% and over.

      The car did great and was competitive with other cars of its type and was quicker than most.

      I'll add in more info soon. Next stop in the Series is Lime Rock Park Raceway Sept 27,28, and 29. http://limerock.com





      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-03-2018 at 10:30 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    21. #89
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      That's so cool!!!
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    22. #90
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      Outstanding!
      Chris


      1966 122S B-18D/M40 4-dr, Sea Green/Brown
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    23. #91
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      Quote Originally Posted by R-Pow3R3d View Post
      That's so cool!!!
      Quote Originally Posted by Csm22 View Post
      Outstanding!
      Thanks to both of you! All of the photographers at the event took some outstanding photos.

      The pre-race prep included lightning the car as much as possible which entailed taking out some of the interior which is easy to put back in for normal driving after the event, the following were removed: the rear seat and package tray, and the support for the bottom cushion, and the passenger seat. It all results in about a 85 lb loss of weight.

      interior pieces over 200 lbs can be removed, it costs nothing, improves performance, and results in no non-reversible modifications to the car which are being avoided at all costs.

      The brakes are working very well with the new EBS "Green Stuff" front pads on the street so the non-original Lockheed brake booster was removed (the original came w/the car) to see how the brakes would operate without it. Was pleased to find that it stops very well without a lot of pedal pressure and resulted in a loss of around 30 more pounds.

      As a part of operating the shop, part of my job is publishing The Old Motor (easy to Google,) a website all about pre-1966 automobiles with new content added 6-days a week, which you might enjoy. Go to the site and search for Volvo in the search box, and you can find an article written about the 1800s and the Hillclimb that contains all of the details to numerous to post here. Sorry not to include link to the post here because Google down-rates search results for websites w/links from online forms.
      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-04-2018 at 06:24 PM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    24. #92
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      Awesome photos and update!

      Having installed the EBC Green Stuff pads all around on my '72 ES, I can attest that they are a great product - great stopping power, low fade and low dust. The original reco for these came from Phil S. and I remain entirely happy with them.
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      vintagewrench... excellent pictures!! Now you have me thinking I just might have to take off my beloved cow horn bumpers, you know, just to see what she'd look like ;-)

      A note on EBC pads... I'm running EBC reds on my 1800, and I really like them.. green (or red), a worthy upgrade to anyone seeking better brakes on these cars..

      Also vintage, it looks like you've stuffed quite a bit of tire up under this car.. maybe I missed it, but what size are you running front and rear?

      I always love seeing updates on this one.. please keep em coming!

      Thanks-

      -ccrunner
      1963 1800S LNF turbo/5 speed build log: http://www.locostusa.com/forums/view...p?f=36&t=16309

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      Quote Originally Posted by dman27 View Post
      Awesome photos and update!

      Having installed the EBC Green Stuff pads all around on my '72 ES, I can attest that they are a great product - great stopping power, low fade and low dust. The original reco for these came from Phil S. and I remain entirely happy with them.

      Quote Originally Posted by ccrunner View Post
      vintagewrench... excellent pictures!! Now you have me thinking I just might have to take off my beloved cow horn bumpers, you know, just to see what she'd look like ;-)

      A note on EBC pads... I'm running EBC reds on my 1800, and I really like them.. green (or red), a worthy upgrade to anyone seeking better brakes on these cars..

      Also vintage, it looks like you've stuffed quite a bit of tire up under this car.. maybe I missed it, but what size are you running front and rear?

      I always love seeing updates on this one.. please keep em coming!

      Thanks-

      -ccrunner

      ccrunner - As to bumpers, they are only effective today with some pre-1970's cars, mostly sports cars, that also have a low bumper height. Ever since the uniform height bumper laws were enacted all cars built after that point have them mounted at a height that will hit P1800, 1800s and 1800 E & ES models in the grill or the center of the rear body panel.

      Many owners prefer the looks of the bumpers on the car and that is OK. But once you have seen one w/out them and have taken the time to study the look, in my our eye, and in those of most of the other people who see this car and comment positively w/out it being made aware of it, say that 1800 series car looks better w/out them. I so think you should try it. I have also cooked up a nice set of small bumperettes for the future that can be used on it when not racing.

      An 1800 series coupe looks quite similar to a Ferrari 250 GT SWB coupe with the exception of the roof line, trunk lid and fins, and putting a set of bumpers on one of them would be like painting a mustache on the Mona Lisa.

      The Green Stuff pads have worked very well on the road and highway, although the brakes did get hot coming down Equinox in 3rd gear using them sparingly. 2nd gear was better but the rpms were at about 4500 in the steepest spots. Will wait and see how the pads do racing at Lime Rock Park later this month but I think they need to be upgraded.


      To - "you've stuffed quite a bit of tire up under this car" - It is lowered 30mm and at first with these wheels it was fitted with a set of 205/65/15 tires that worked fine except on larger bumps in the road when rubbing took place. If the inside fender edges were rolled or flattened it would not be a problem, but I do not want to make that modification. It now has a set of 195/65/15 tires and there is no rubbing at all. This was done before the decision was made to race the car with the VSCCA.

      The sanctioning body has strict tire rules where nothing wider than a 185 on this type of car is legal and a period 70 series aspect ratio must also be used. So for next season either 185/70/15 Pirelli P6000 or Dunlop L series racing tires will be used.
      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-06-2018 at 07:06 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    27. #95
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      Quote Originally Posted by vintagewrench View Post

      An 1800 series coupe looks quite similar to a Ferrari 250 GT SWB coupe with the exception of the roof line, trunk lid and fins, and putting a set of bumpers on one of them would be like painting a mustache on the Mona Lisa.
      Aside from the differences in the back 1/3 of the cars, the similarity also takes a severe departure when it comes to the price, the 250 GT SWBs living up in the $10 - 14 M neighborhood.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

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      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      Aside from the differences in the back 1/3 of the cars, the similarity also takes a severe departure when it comes to the price, the 250 GT SWBs living up in the $10 - 14 M neighborhood.
      You are correct about that. Before the first run up in prices that began in the mid-1990s and then crashed in a 1998 recession I was fortunate to be able to drive one for a couple of hours that was owned by a client at the time. I will never forget that afternoon out on country roads with the V-12 powered masterpiece. He later sold it for $1.5 M which was a record price at the time.

      A 1962 Ferrari GTO sold a couple of weeks ago for $48.4 M at a Pebble Beach auction, and another sold privately in the last year or so for somewhere in the neighborhood of $70 M.
      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-06-2018 at 07:02 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    29. #97
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      Clearly I have been 'out of the market' for a while, although that market is so thin and volatile that I expect that prices can be all over the place. I seem to recall a story a few years ago that when the cars were still in the $10 M range, some owner had hired a professional driver to race their 250 GT SWB in some historic event and the car was crashed / totalled during the race. $10M 'too bad, so sad' ; but, I guess don't play if you can't afford to pay. I suspect that given the value of the provenance of the chassis number someone probably took all the pieces and recreated the car like a phoenix from the ashes.

      With the exception perhaps of a true 123 GT, the P1800 probably has the highest market value of the vintage Volvos. Perhaps its a good thing that the value remains low enough that people can still enjoy the cars.
      A 142 of course. What do you expect? I'm the 142 guy. / 1971 142 E 102 color

    30. #98
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      Quote Originally Posted by 142 Guy View Post
      With the exception perhaps of a true 123 GT, the P1800 probably has the highest market value of the vintage Volvos. Perhaps its a good thing that the value remains low enough that people can still enjoy the cars.
      You are correct about 123 GT's being valuable, almost two years ago a beautifuly restored dark blue w/red interior example with some well-done performance modifications sold publicly on Bringatrailer for $27,750. It is possible others have sold privately for more?

      Early correct 1961-'63 P1800 cars in excellent condition have sold in the 30K to 60K range.

      1964 to '69 1800s models in perfect condition have sold for 30K and more. Three plus years ago Gooding & Company sold at auction a red over black 1967 1800s a: “Time-Capsule” Example One Owner for 47 Years with just 10,085 Miles from New Beautifully Preserved Paint and Interior." It sold for 77K.

      1800E and ES models in the popular color combinations are selling for the most money. Perfect condition light blue metallic 1800E coupes are selling privately in the 30K to 50K range; Sea green (darker blue metallic) 1800ES models are also selling for about the same amount. Bonham's sold an ES for over 100K a few years ago.

      Cars in most desirable colors tend to sell for the highest prices, although I sense the market, fueled by speculators bringing cars to market, and the best examples selling at auction has cooled off a bit over the last year or so.

      On the other side of the coin, there are plenty of average useable condition 1800 series cars on the market selling in the 10K to 20K range, so the everyday enthusiast has not been priced out of the market.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    31. #99
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      Recently made up this Sport Exhaust for racing at tracks that require mufflers and for driving to and returning from the track if I don't want to load the tools, equipment, and the car into the shop trailer and tow it there. The length used was that recommended by Volvo Competition Services (VCS) to help extract the exhaust from the engine and produce more power across the RPM range.

      This system is LOUD if you rev it up quickly, are climbing a hill, or above 4000 rpm while driving it on the road. Planing on adding a removable baffle into the end of the pipe to quite it down a bit for road use. It adds to somewhere around five to ten HP and also eliminates about 40 pounds of weight due to using no rear pipe, muffler, clamps and hangers. Headers really are not needed as the stock 4 into 2 manifold design is excellent and VCS reports the only four more HP was made using one of its 4-2-1 headers probably at over the 6500 rpm rev limit of this engine.

      The system is made up of a larger B20 2" two-into-one front pipe that also fits the '67 B18B manifold, a VP 2" straight thru Sport Muffler with an offset center for more ground clearance, a 2" mandrel bent elbow and a straight length of 2" pipe.

      No modification or holes need to be drilled in the floor or frame members for a hanger. Remove one of the four white plugs in the rear right-hand side floor and the necessary hole is available. A short mild steel tab with a hole drilled and tapped in it for a 5/16" fine thread is welded to the front side of the straight length of pipe below the center of the hole in the floor.

      Three one-inch cupped engine water jacket core plugs were drilled to 11/16-inch in the center for clearance necessary due to exhaust system vibration. Two short medium-strength springs (heat has not affected the temper of the springs) that are used inside of the cups both above and below the floor. In this case, a stud with a lock nut at the bottom of the tab on the side of the pipe was used and a nut and lock nut or a locking nut can be used at the top above the top core plug to adjust the spring pressure. This allows the system to "float" with the engine and transmission and not put any stresses to the entire system including the manifold.

      This system adds somewhere around five plus HP and also eliminates about 40-lb. of weight due to not using the rear pipes, muffler, clamps, and hangers. It has been driven over 1000 miles that includes 66 miles of competition at the Mt Equinox hillclimb. The increase in power is noticeable and will come in handy at the VSCCA Fall Finale race meet at Lime Rock Park located in northeastern CT.

      Will weld the section of it the behind the muffler together soon, and also make up a short section of straight pipe for use on tracks that allow open exhaust.

      Disregard the mud on the bottom of the car, the shop is located on one of Vermont's excellent packed gravel roads.

      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-11-2018 at 06:41 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    32. #100
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      Looks fantastic. If you are selling any of the supercharger, the Volvo competition filter or manifolds or carbs please reach out!


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

    33. #101
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      Quote Originally Posted by Swiss 1800 View Post
      Looks fantastic. If you are selling any of the supercharger, the Volvo competition filter or manifolds or carbs please reach out!
      Thanks for asking. A set of the VCS manifolds and Weber 40 DCOE carbs will be going on the 1800s in the near future. At this point it has not been determined which induction system will be installed on the other car, a 122s.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    34. #102
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      Beautiful car and a reminder of how classic Volvos are one of the more drive-able classic cars that you can own. Agreed on the beauty challenging the Ferrari.

      Almost makes me wish I had restored rather than resto-moded mine!

      Hugely jealous of those wheels.

      Pete

    35. #103
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      Quote Originally Posted by NOHOME View Post
      Beautiful car and a reminder of how classic Volvos are one of the more drive-able classic cars that you can own. Agreed on the beauty challenging the Ferrari.

      Almost makes me wish I had restored rather than resto-moded mine!

      Hugely jealous of those wheels.

      Pete
      Thanks for the kind words about the the car - everyone loves the Halibrand knock-offs.

      Prepping it now for the last VSCCA race of the season next weekend at Lime Rock Park, one of the nicest tracks in the country @ http://limerock.com
      Last edited by vintagewrench; 09-24-2018 at 07:17 AM.
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    36. #104
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      Headed to Lime Rock Park http://limerock.com located in Lakeville, CT in the morning to run in two practice sessions on Fri. and two road races on Sat. at the VSCCA Fall Finale. https://www.vscca.org The final event for the season is held on at one of the nicest tracks in the east which is quite challenging and also has a substantial change in evaluation.

      Instead of loading the car and all of the tools into the trailer and hooking up the truck, I'm doing it the old fashioned way again - driving it 300 miles round trip to the track and back home again. Will do a follow up after the races.







      18003
      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

    37. #105
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      Prepared the 1800s last week and then packed up and chose once again to drive the 130 miles to Lime Rock Park on Thursday. After arriving the car passed the tech inspection, so everything was ready to go for Friday's two practice sessions and two races on Saturday.

      It performed very well in the two practice sessions and after starting in mid-pack in both races on Saturday was able to lap over half of the field both times before the 20 laps were over. Very pleased with the car's performance in its first races on the challenging road course.

      The original matching number engine is a completely stock 115 hp B18B and needs to produce more power for next season to be able to pull a 4:30 or 4:10 rear gear to allow moving farther up in the field. With the standard 4:56 ratio the rpms were at 7000, 500 over the redline at the end of the front straight at the next to the last #2 brake marker for the entry into Big Bend, the fast right-hander at the end of the front straight.

      The weekend was a total success, nothing broke or needed any attention, and it was driven back home another 130 miles on Saturday night.

      1967 1800s and 1968 122s Station Wagon.

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