Rear stay control arms bushing replacement
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    1. #1
      Junior Member atraudes's Avatar
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      Rear stay control arms bushing replacement

      I finally got around to replacing the stay bushings on my car, and wanted to do a quick writeup on what all was involved. First off, a huge thanks to the author of this page. The Google translation is a little rough and he already had a custom press ready to go, but it was the only howto I could find on the procedure. "Bushing" translates to "silent", btw. This page was also an excellent resource, so thanks to those folks as well!



      This part appears to be set up exactly the same and shares the same part number on all 2003-2014 XC90s, regardless of engine or how many powered wheels you have. This may also be applicable to the S60, S80, and V70, but I'll let others pipe in on that. It's the blue piece here in the subframe diagram. There's another stay that attaches to the rear of the hub, so this isn't the only "stay" on the rear.



      I'm guessing you should plan on them lasting 10 years or 100,000 miles, but naturally your mileage may vary. Mine is a 2004 with 150,000 miles and they were somewhat spongey and had cracks forming. If you're having trouble with toe in the rear, this is a great place to start looking.



      They're easy to find if you know where your fuel filter is (just to the front of the right rear wheel). Just find the fuel filter, and look about 6" behind it. Same position on the other side.



      If you're wondering if this needs to go on your todo list, they're easy to check! Just grab the fork arm bolted onto it and try twisting and pushing on it. You shouldn't be able to manipulate a good bushing by hand. If you're able to move it at all or you see cracks or tears like on mine, it's probably due for a change. Lifting the rear like you're changing a tire will also put stress on it and make any damage very obvious.

      The good news is it's not too difficult to do yourself and for the most part only requires simple hand tools. It's very accessible. However, unless you already have bearing pressing tools it does require a fair amount of preparation. On the upside, the parts needed to build your own setup can be had for less than $60.

      Here's the parts I used for my custom jig. I found this lot at Home Depot, but places like Lowes will probably also work:

      • Southland 511-208HN - 2" galvanized steel pipe coupling - $10
      • Southland 511-207HN - 1½" galvanized steel pipe coupling - $7
      • Southland 568‑001HN - 2" galvanized steel close nipple - $4
      • Simpson Strong-Tie BP 1/2-3HDG - 3" x 3" Galvanized Bearing Plate with 1/2 in. Dia Bolt - $4 each (buy 2)

      Note: While the 1½" coupling is not strictly necessary, I highly recommend getting it. You can press the new bushing in with the close nipple, but the thin edges mean it loves to move around on you. Using the flat end of the coupling is a much more foolproof approach. I completed one side with the close nipple, but the other side is off center by about a centimeter because the bushing collar collapsed a bit just as I got to the home stretch and I couldn't get the nipple to seat flat any more. I'm guessing I'm lucky I got as far as I did so I'm officially recommending using the coupling instead.

      I originally tried a 3/8" nut/bolt/washer combo from Home Depot but after giving it the beans the threads gave up almost immediately. I then went to Fastenal and tracked down some bolts that had the key characteristics I was looking for:

      • 7/16" diameter. A 1/2" bolt just barely doesn't fit through the bushing, so I went with the next size down.
      • Grade 8. I'm guessing the first bolt died because it was a plain-Jane steel bolt, nothing special.
      • Fine thread. The more threads being engaged, the stronger the hold.
      • Length. It's really hard to find an 8" 7/16 grade 8 bolt!

      I was also able to find a tall nut. Again, more threads in the nut means less opportunity for failure. The downside to using grade 8, however, was that they don't sell bolts with threads along the entire length of the bolt. Grade 8 bolts generally only have a small threaded section to maintain strength. This meant I had to buy three bolts that ranged from the minimum length I'd need to the maximum, with enough overlap between them to fit the nut and just swap them out as they bottomed out.



      These had to be ordered and I picked up from my local Fastenal spot about a week later:

      • 18892 - 7/16"-20 x 6" Grade 8 bolt - $4
      • 18894 - 7/16"-20 x 7" Grade 8 bolt - $5
      • 18896 - 7/16"-20 x 8" Grade 8 bolt - $9
      • 37889 - 7/16"-20 Grade 8 high nut - $2 (I grabbed a few extras too)
      • 33859 - Washers - $0.25 (I grabbed 6 but only used 4)

      The bushing part number is 31277893 and run about $10 each. I also bought replacement bolts. It turned out to be unnecessary since the old ones were in good shape, but bolts are cheap insurance. Their part number was 985063 and they were $5 each.

      Once you have all the parts in hand you'll need to do some prep work to get them ready. The 2" coupling will act as a cup which the bushing will get pressed into, and the close nipple will be the drift. However, out of the box, they won't work as such. I had to use a Dremel with a stone grinding tip and grind the threads down on both.

      Before:



      After:



      The cup will need the threads ground down enough for the bushing to plop into it without any resistance.



      The drift will need the threads ground down just enough to make it slightly smaller than the bushing. It will need to be able to pass through the subframe hole without any resistance.



      Pro tip: use a particle mask. Grinding the threads down takes a while and produces a super fine black dust which you probably don't want in your lungs. Eye protection is probably advisable as well. After listening to an hour or two of the grinding sound you'll probably also wish you had worn ear plugs. Learn from my mistakes

      Once you've got all that done, you're ready to replace some bushings. It took me just under 2 hours per side. Put the bushings in the freezer. Doing so will make them shrink ever so slightly which makes pressing them in noticeably easier. It's not required, but they're more likely to go in straight the first time if you do. Also, give the jig's bolt threads and washers a light coat of axle grease.

      Before jacking up the back and removing the wheel, remove the bolt from the arm attached to the bushing. The old bolts had a 17mm head and the new bolts had a 15mm. Once that's out, chock the front wheels, jack up the rear, and remove the tire. Undo the 12mm bolt holding the brake line bracket in place.

      Now you'll line up your drift and cup. On the side near you, you'll run the 8" bolt through two washers, a steel plate, and your drift. On the other side you'll have the cup, steel plate, two washers, and the nut. Before you torque it down, make sure the cup is seated over the old bushing and the drift is perfectly centered. I used a 5/8" wrench on the head of the bolt to hold it still, and a ratchet with an 11/16" socket on the nut (yeah, I know I have a wrench on the nut in this picture).



      Once you're sure everything's lined up properly, start wrenching. You may hear a pop as the old bushing breaks free. It will move slowly thanks to the fine threads, but the ratchet shouldn't require a huge amount of torque. Once you feel it start to tighten up, you've probably bottomed out the nut on the bolt. If you pull off the socket, you should see about an inch and a half of threads exposed. Pull the nut off and replace the bolt with the 7" one. The bushing should pop out before you bottom out on this bolt. Once the bushing is out, check out the inside of the subframe. You'll want to clean up any corrosion in there. Mine were in great shape so I just cleaned it up with a nylon wire wheel.



      Apply a bit of axle grease to the inside of the subframe that you just cleaned up. It'll help avoid future corrosion and makes the bushing's journey back in a bit easier. Grab your bushing out of the freezer. Before you set it in place, make sure the bearing's core is oriented correctly. The line in the center should be vertical relative to the arm, like so:



      I forgot to do this but I ultimately decided to just leave it as-is. If it weren't a solid bushing I probably would have decided it mattered enough and redid them.

      Line it up on the back as straight as you can and push it in a bit so it sticks in place. Grab your 7" bolt and run it through 2 washers and a steel plate on the front, and on the back your coupling drift (not the nipple drift as pictured), steel plate, two washers, and nut.



      Make sure the drift is perfectly centered and start wrenching again. If by chance the bushing goes crooked you can either tap it out with a punch and hammer and try again, or use a hammer to persuade it back into line. Once you bottom out the 7" bolt, swap it out for the 6". When it feels like it may be bottoming out, remove the jig. If the steel core of the bushing is pressing up against the front plate, it's time to move back up to the 8" bolt and utilize the cup again. Look inside the cup and get a feel for where it needs to be positioned to be centered on the subframe hole. As you continue pressing, the bushing's shell will go into the cup a bit.



      Start wrenching again and stop once you've got a centimeter or so of the outer sleeve still sticking out. Pull off the jig and figure out how much more to press it to get it centered. Once you're satisfied it's nice and centered, bolt up the brake bracket again, reinstall the wheel and lower the car. Once the full weight of the car is on the wheels again, reinstall the control arm bolt. If you can't quite get it to thread, have a family member or two sit in the back seat. If that's not quite enough, have them rock the car while you try to thread it. Loading and unloading the back will move the control arm in and out ever so slightly. Final torquing should always take place with the car's weight on the wheels. Torque to 80nM.

      As an afterthought, it may have been possible to use an impact on the jig's nut instead of the ratchet, but I felt that being able to feel variations in the torque being applied was too valuable. It communicates important things like when the nut has bottomed out or when the bushing core is contacting the plate. That said, if you're confident in your impact skills, have at it!

      If you have any feedback or decide to make a go of this yourself, please don't hesitate to reply!
      2004 XC90 T6, 150k miles

      Buy some Volvo parts from my eBay store

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    3. #2
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
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      Did both cars last year with a bushing press set- https://forums.swedespeed.com/showthr...ngs-in-General, great to see other ways of doing this job.
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 198k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 127k

    4. #3
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      Geez... Don't you guys have any big sockets!
      John C
      ---------------------
      2011 XC90 3.2 171,000 miles and counting...

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    6. #4
      Junior Member atraudes's Avatar
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      ggleavitt: I'm kicking myself really hard right now. I don't know how I missed it; it would've saved me a ton of research! I was all pumped up to buy a bushing kit but every one I found either didn't a good enough selection of cups, got terrible reviews, or was over $700. If you feel like it's a high enough quality tool set that's good enough for me. I'll save my time and just buy one of those next time. The control arms could probably stand to be freshened up...

      Then again, with how many bushings I've pushed with pipe fittings, I'm only a few pieces away from the full Home Depot kit

      John C: I have some big sockets, but apparently not enough! Sounds like a good excuse to go buy some more tools though.
      2004 XC90 T6, 150k miles

      Buy some Volvo parts from my eBay store

    7. #5
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
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      Sad part is you could have driven over and picked the kit up from me, would have taken an hour (not including however long we were chatting about XC90s). Pretty impressed with how you did it, sure beats a $140 bushing kit !

      Very happy you created this thread, now besides the Russian guy there are 2 more references in English and I'm part of a real post under a proper title for folks who may be searching in future.

      Thanks !
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 198k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 127k

    8. #6
      Junior Member atraudes's Avatar
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      Well, I'm sure there'll be a next time. Also, ditto! I've got a decent collection of tools so just hit me up if you ever need anything.
      2004 XC90 T6, 150k miles

      Buy some Volvo parts from my eBay store

    9. #7
      Member 91shelby's Avatar
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      I need to do this on mine soon. ggleavitt I would be very interested in borrowing your kit sometime if you'd allow it. I'm just on the other side of the pond. I have VIDA and dice if you or someone you know needs to have something checked sometime
      2004 C70 T5 AT vert 77k Black Sapphire
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    10. #8
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      Excellent write-up....the both of you. It really helps when people post their own experiences doing these jobs, especially with the pics. The Home Depot bushing tools are great too.

    11. #9
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      Just finished replacing my trailing-arm bushings, and this thread was a huge help. Thought I’d post a few pix and comments from my experience. So…

      First off, while I love what a Dremel can do, I just don’t have the patience or discipline for the amount of dremeling involved in grinding all those threads down, so I did some thinking over a couple of beers about how I could dodge it. First thing I came up was to bench-grind the threads off the 2” galvanized nipple. A 2” hole-saw fits inside the nipple with just a little clearance, and a few wraps of tape (I used two layers of 3M 600V electric tape, which is quite thick) made up the difference so I could twist the nipple onto the saw and get a good, grippy fit:



      Then you just put the saw on a drill, pull the trigger and grind away. Much quicker, and gives you a very even on-center grind:


      (and just to state the blindingly obvious, you want the coupling spinning against the spin of the grinder; the drill is in reverse in the picture above.)

      But I couldn’t come up with a similar cheat for grinding the insides of the couplings. So I started wondering just how strong PVC pipe is under compression, and decided to find out. A local hardware store had grade 8 all-thread bolts up to six inches long, so I figured I’d try using the 2” nipple for a drift and a series of increasing-length stretches of PVC for the cup, since that would be cheaper than decreasing-length grade-8 bolts.”. Grabbed a couple of couplings for 2” ID Schedule 40 pipe (the new bushing dropped right into them), and cut them on a miter saw:


      One thing I learned here is, the couplings aren’t perfect cylinders, they have a slight barrel shape. So I wound up with the first one cut just a couple of degrees off-square. (And they have a ridge on the middle of the inside which requires a few seconds of attention with the Dremel, but that’s easy.)

      For the end-plates, I grabbed a couple of floor flange plates for ¾” galvanized pipe. And they didn’t have the all-thread bolts in 7/16”, so I downgraded to 3/8”. Added a couple of washers on each end and wound up with this, which fit very nicely:


      So I started wrenching. And what I learned is, a) Sch.40 PVC under compression will outlast the threads on a 3/8” G8 bolt (coarse thread, since that’s what the store had), and b) I’m never going to try to press out a bushing again, I’m just gonna cut the damn things out. The threads didn’t give entirely, but they gave enough that backing the nut up took a little muscle, and the bushing hadn’t budged. So I chased the threads with a tap and die, and went to press the new ones in. Had a real hard time keeping the galvanized-nipple-drift square on the bushing, and then the threads on the bolt gave out entirely. So, back to the hardware store for another G8 bolt (7/16” x 5” this time, not all-thread), and a Schedule 80 1 ½” PVC coupling (which served the same purpose as the 1 ½” galvanized couple on atraudes’ rig). Having learned my lesson, I used a couple of pieces of the Sch.40 PVC to keep the new coupling square to the blade when I cut it to fit:



      and got a couple of nice, square pieces with thick walls that sat nice and stable against the new bushing.

      Now, one issue I was worried about was that with the ¾” holes on my end-plates, keeping everything centered was going to be an issue. But it turned out that was a bonus: when the bearing would go a little cockeyed as I started to press it in, I could just back off a little, move the bolt off-center towards the reluctant side of the bushing, and it would straighten the bushing back out:


      Note in this pic that the bushing is cockeyed, and the left end of the bolt, and the plate, are off-center to correct. Had to make this adjustment twice on each bushing before it was in far enough to center itself.

      After that, I was running downhill all the way (the second bushing was a little more reluctant than the first, but a couple of shots of silicone lube eased it in). The only other tip I would offer is, if you have a caliper (or just a small bar-clamp), set it to the depth of the bushing beforehand. Then use it to judge when you’ve got the bushing centered, so you don’t have to disassemble your press to check:



      So, since I never actually pressed the old bushings out, I never used the galvanized nipple that I ground down (and didn’t check to see if the Sch80 PVC would pass through the bushing mount, because I didn’t press the old bushings out so it didn’t matter, but if it matters to anybody else, I recommend the bench-grinder). What I wound up using to press the new ones in was this:



      (You’ll note that the sch.40 PVC did deform to fit the holes on the end plates, but it still held up well enough for what I needed.)

      So, with a big assist from atraudes, that job’s done. Now I can get back to that damned leaky VC gasket….
      Last edited by bdubya; 08-22-2018 at 01:55 PM.

    12. #10
      Junior Member atraudes's Avatar
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      I'm loving it! I wouldn't have thought that PVC would have held up. Also, that setup with the bench grinder is awesome.

      Thanks for the followup. I'm glad to hear you got them in.
      2004 XC90 T6, 150k miles

      Buy some Volvo parts from my eBay store

    13. #11
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      Thank for posting and contributing to this thread, gang! Just doing mine on my XC70...bad news on this car is that you need to lower the subframe to get proper access to the bushing. Oh, and to make matters worse, you can only access the rear of the bushing partially from the back (opening is just enough to get a scocket in) and from the side (just wide enough to slip a thin sleeve in). Love it.

      Thank you especially for posting those Fastenal part #'s - you saved me a fair amount of time searching for these!!!
      2010 V70 3.2 125,000miles
      2002 V70XC, 175,000 miles
      2004 S60 2.5T, 160,000 miles

    14. #12
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      My 2005 XC90 2.5T with 120K has slight cracks in the Rear Trailing Arm Bushing.
      No significant play.
      No major symptoms.

      I am just curious what symptoms you guys have when your bushing went bad?

    15. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by cn90 View Post
      My 2005 XC90 2.5T with 120K has slight cracks in the Rear Trailing Arm Bushing.
      No significant play.
      No major symptoms.

      I am just curious what symptoms you guys have when your bushing went bad?
      Since the bushing slowly wears out and becomes soft over time, it is difficult to tell. I know that mine weren't cracked completely through, but there were visible surface wear cracks in the rubber.

      When I changed them to the newer solid bushings, it really made the rear tighter and more precise. Part of the reason for the XC90's wind drift and handling is due to the rear. Add these rear bushings to the front refresh and it makes for a nice complete front and rear handling package.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 143k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    16. #14
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      Thanks...

      I see quite a few different bushings when reviewing XC90 rear susp diagram.

      Is this the only bushing that needs to be replaced at let's say 120K-140K range?

    17. #15
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      Need is a personal choice, lol.

      It is the largest suspension bushing in the rear so you can say it could contribute significantly to the rear [mis]alignment if it gets soft or breaks. It's also one of the easier ones to change.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 143k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    18. #16
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      Just removed the rear wheel and inspect my 2005 XC90 2.5T with 120K miles...

      - The trailing arm bushing, being hollow in design, after thousands of cycles
      of push and pull (acceleration, braking), it is gone.

      - All other bushings, being solid rubber in design, are still good.

      - The new trailing arm bushing: Lemforder $11;. Volvo $16. Your choice.
      I bought Lemforder.

      - For control arm bushings, some car mfg's use hollow for comfort (also less risk of shimmy).
      But hollow bushings have limited lifespan.
      Solid bushings last longer, like a hockey puck, which is solid rubber...

    19. #17
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      I used to do exactly like the O.P. posted, buying plumbing adapters, grind them to fit etc. etc.
      It is a lot of work to modify plumbing parts to make it work.
      It is NOT worth it as we have an alternative now...

      Just go to Advance Auto Parts and rent the tool set called "Powerbuilt 23 Piece Ball Joint and U Joint Service Set - 648617".

      If you buy this online, it is $150:
      https://www.amazon.com/Alltrade-6486.../dp/B0028QGT86

      But when you rent it at Advance Auto, you need to deposit $240, once you return the tool, they refund you $240.
      So it is FREE.


      Here is a photo of the tool set...
      I will do this weekend and post detail later.


      ---
      AdAutoRental23Pieces.jpg

    20. #18
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      I bought the Harbor Freight version of the "ball joint" tool in 2007-ish. It's one of maybe 2-3 things I've bought from HF that's worked out really well. Grease up the threads and use a breaker bar, and I'd bet you could lay down the better part of ten tons of force. Regardless of brand, these sorts of tools have a million uses.

      -Ryan
      Too many cars...
      1987 Volvo 245
      1989 Volvo 245
      1991 Volvo 745 Dog Waggin' 2.0
      1995 Volvo 945 Turbo
      2011 Volvo XC90 3.2 AWD
      2016 Fiat 500X (Wife-mobile)

    21. #19
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      DIY: REAR Trailing Arm Bushing Replacement (2005 XC90 2.5T AWD with 120K)

      - The usual symptoms: car drives “like a boat” with vague feeling. Difficulty with alignment.
      - Inspection showed cracked bushing.

      TOOLS:
      - Wrenches/Sockets: 15mm, 19mm, and 22mm (for the Advance Auto Parts Rental Tool).
      - Wheel lugs: 19mm socket.
      - Breaker Bar, the 1/2-inch type.

      - Propane Torch ($15 at hardware store) is a MUST, this allows you to remove the seized bolts/nuts with much less effort.

      - The key thing: heat the “nut: side for 30-45 sec to melt factory Loctite (the rubber bushing may smoke a bit!), then spray some PB Blaster and allows it to be sucked inside the threads as the nut cools down.

      - I used to buy plumbing adapters, grind them to fit etc. etc.
      It is a lot of work to modify plumbing parts to make it work. Plus the M12 bolt does not have enough strength to press the old bushing, which is often stuck with salt corrosion, out.
      - IMHO, playing with plumbing adapters is NOT worth it as we have an alternative...

      - Just go to Advance Auto Parts and rent the tool set called "Powerbuilt 23 Piece Ball Joint and U Joint Service Set - 648617". Oil the thread during use.

      - If you buy this online, it is $150:
      https://www.amazon.com/Alltrade-6486.../dp/B0028QGT86

      - When you rent it at Advance Auto, you need to deposit $240, once you return the tool, they refund you $240.
      So it is FREE.

      - Here is a photo of the tool set. You do NEED this “weapon of mass destruction tool” lol…
      This rental tool is the ticket.


      AdvAutoRental23Pieces.jpg


      PARTS:
      - From FCPEuro dot com.
      - Bushing is Volvo 31277893: Volvo $18; Lemforder $11.
      I used Lemforder.
      - I looked at all the REAR bushings. Only the Trailing Arm Bushing #3 is hollow from factory (it is now solid rubber). The rest of the bushings are solid rubber. So no need to worry about the rest until 250K or so.


      2005-XC90-Rear-Susp-Diagram.jpg


      PROCEDURE:

      - Cleanliness is the key, wash the car the day before...
      - Do one side at a time and use the other side as a reference. This has proved to be essential for me!
      - Loctite on 15-mm bolt during installation.

      - Use heat to your advantage: I heat around the old busing (where the aluminum part of bushing meets the steel hole) a bit. Lemforder bushing in freezer overnight…
      - NOTE: once all done, all nuts/bolts should be torque in pre-loaded condition (as if you drive the car), so torque the 15-mm bolt at the end when the wheel is attached and car is on the ground.
      - A piece of 2 x 10 wood, about 8 inches long is very useful…

      - Torque values are taken from "internet", so please verify the torque values yourself. I could not find a good source, so what I include here is from different sources. Feel free to chime in re torque values.

      - General rules in Nm:
      M8: 24 Nm; M10: 50 Nm; M12: 80 Nm, M14: 130Nm
      .
      Remember this is for dry bolt, very often these bolts are coated in salt/corrosion, so clean the bolt first.
      Google “thread file”, about $10. Thread file is a very good tool to clean the threads.

      - AT 100K-120K, I guess it is safe to re-use the bolt, which the dealers do anyway. At 200K + miles, I think it is a good idea to get all new bolt, but that is later for me…

      1. Safety first:
      - Chock FRONT wheels.
      - Lift the rear end, remove ONLY 1 rear wheel and support with jack stands as shown.

      - For EACH side, I used 1 jack stand + 1 floor jack. No need to crawl under the car for this job.
      - Tire + wood under the car.

      2. Once you have the car up with jack stand (note that I used screw-type jack for this), jack the control arm up a bit to allow you to remove the 15-mm bolt.


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-01.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-02.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-03.jpg

    22. #20
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      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-04.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-05.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-06.jpg


      3. Piece of wood to create the space. Note that the factory bushing sticks out on both sides:
      - OUTER side: 5.0-5.5 mm or so.
      - INNER side: 6.5-7.0 mm or so.
      Make sure you measured it.

      - Also, the factory bushing used to be hollow on the fore and aft areas to allow the trailing arm to move back and forth. After thousands of cycles, the bushing cracks. The new Lemforder bushing is all solid rubber. But I line it up with the vertical slot as factory. So use liquid paper or white paint to mark it.


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-08.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-07.jpg
      Last edited by cn90; 12-08-2019 at 11:12 AM.

    23. #21
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      4. Various configurations of the "WMD" rental tool to show you how to remove/install bushing.
      - Note that the rental tool is not Volvo factory tool, it is just generic bushing tool, so you will have to find the right combinations that work for you.

      - Basic principle of any bushing: pressing a bushing against a hole. The idea is to press against the metal part of the bushing. Do NOT ever push on the inner section (where the bolt goes through), you will damage the bushing. Since I worked alone, it was difficult balancing act, so I used an M12 bolt to help hold the sleeve in place.

      - On the “receiver” side, make sure the sleeve is large enough to accommodate the bushing. Sometimes when the old bushing comes out, it can hit the sleeve, causing the tool to bind, so be aware of this!
      - When the old bushing comes out, it will create some loud bangs from the corrosion over the years. So be ready for this noise. Spray with PB Blaster to help lubricate it. The big bolt is VERY POWERFUL, you should be able to press the old bushing out (with some bangs). If the big bolt is stuck, something is messed up. STOP and verify before you damage the new bushing!

      - The body underpanel partially blocks the big bolt, so if the bushing is slightly crooked, remove it and start again. I sprayed some lubrication to help it in. A bit of heat to warm the steel hole, plus frozen bushing helps reduce the force needed to press it in.


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-09.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-10.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-11.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-12.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-13.jpg
      Last edited by cn90; 12-08-2019 at 12:12 PM.

    24. #22
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      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-14.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-15.jpg



      5. As mentioned above. Raise the control arm (watch exactly where to place the jack, it can slip any time!) to allow you to insert the 15-mm bolt. Tighten this bolt ONLY after the car is back on the ground.

      PS: On the RIGHT side, I installed the new bushing from Outside ---> Inward. For the LEFT side, I installed the new bushing from Inside ---> Outward (because of tool clearance issue). Do what works for you.

      That is all, not too difficult job if you use the correct "WMD" rental tool for free…


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-16.jpg


      2005-XC90-Tr-Arm-Bushing-17.jpg

    25. #23
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      Great write-up and thanks for sharing!
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 143k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    26. #24
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      I will order from this guys Poly as in front I placed all Poly. I dont care for small vibration on idle.
      https://siberianbushing.com/catalog/...XC90/XC90/2006
      XC90 2.5T VOR AWD 2006 318.600 km
      Proudly GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS and VOR XC90 2.5t Nr. 615 from 1574 Volvo's 31.03.2019 UK
      + 5704 km longest distance traveled to #Volvo600 UK meeting.

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