2011 T6 Spark Plug Change - Advice for dealing with the rats nest of wiring over the plugs?
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    1. #1
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      2011 T6 Spark Plug Change - Advice for dealing with the rats nest of wiring over the plugs?

      Maybe not the best post, since I donít have a pic to post (yet).

      I pulled the engine cover off my T6 tonight just to check things out before I buy some plugs and attempt to tackle this maintenance task myself. It looks like a fairly simple job, except one of the plugs, fifth one if counting from left to right, is buried under wires. Since Volvo wrapped the heck out of the wiring I canít just move the wire out of the way.

      Iím sure I can get the wire out of the way with a lot of extra effort, so Iím just curious if anyone had a tip/trick to save some time, or if I just need to suck it up.

      Thanks,

      Nip


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      2004 V70R MT TiGray/Nordkap - Replica 18" Pegs - Handbrake Mod
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    4. #3
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      2011 T6 Spark Plug Change - Advice for dealing with the rats nest of wiring over the plugs?

      Quote Originally Posted by R-Pow3R3d View Post
      []
      I appreciate the effort - the wiring of that engine is nothing like my own....

      I have a very early build number ... wondering if I have a little extra tape/mess going on with my car. Pretty sure my build is so early the trunk design is different that most cars out there...


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      Last edited by TheNip73; 02-25-2018 at 11:00 PM. Reason: Remove duplicate video stream.

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      Quote Originally Posted by TheNip73 View Post
      I appreciate the effort - the wiring of that engine is nothing like my own....

      I have a very early build number ... wondering if I have a little extra tape/mess going on with my car. Pretty sure my build is so early the trunk design is different that most cars out there...


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      Bummer. I was hopeful that a T6 would be a T6, regardless of model.
      2004 V70R MT TiGray/Nordkap - Replica 18" Pegs - Handbrake Mod
      2007 XC90 V8 Sport Passion Red/Off-Black - Serpentine Belt, Tensioner & Idler Pulleys - Spark Plug Replacement - Y-Pipe Replacement
      1990 745 Turbo Intercooler White/Beige
      2006 XC70
      VIDA/DICE Owner - SS Lurker Since 2009 - '06-'07 Transmission Valve Body Info - SR/VR Failing Throttle Body
      Current Non-Volvo: 2007 VTX 1800 F3, 2002 VT750DC
      Previous: 2006 S60R, 1999 F250 Powerstroke, 2005 TSX, 1997 Bonneville, 1998 Concorde

    7. #5
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      Sorry I can't help you with your wiring question, TheNip73, but I find it eases install of spark plugs to put a little anti seize on the threads to prevent binding/galling during thread in. Some techs have voiced to me before to not use anti seize on plug threads because it later hardens but I have been using that method for years and never had a problem getting plugs out later. This was on high boost applications and in extreme heat and cold too.

      Also,the plugs are probably pre-gapped but I always double check them anyway to be sure. I am not aware of gap size for the T6 application, sorry.

      And I also put a little die electric silicone based grease on the spark plug wire boot or coil boot if it's rubber to help it slide over the plug and keep a good seal from moisture.
      Geo-political oracle sent to fight Satan and his minions. Keep calm and boycott the NWO. "We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false". - william casey CIA Director 1981

    8. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by TheNip73 View Post
      I appreciate the effort - the wiring of that engine is nothing like my own....

      I have a very early build number ... wondering if I have a little extra tape/mess going on with my car. Pretty sure my build is so early the trunk design is different that most cars out there...


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      How about posting a picture?

      Quote Originally Posted by Caspian3.2 View Post
      Sorry I can't help you with your wiring question, TheNip73, but I find it eases install of spark plugs to put a little anti seize on the threads to prevent binding/galling during thread in. Some techs have voiced to me before to not use anti seize on plug threads because it later hardens but I have been using that method for years and never had a problem getting plugs out later. This was on high boost applications and in extreme heat and cold too.

      Also,the plugs are probably pre-gapped but I always double check them anyway to be sure. I am not aware of gap size for the T6 application, sorry.

      And I also put a little die electric silicone based grease on the spark plug wire boot or coil boot if it's rubber to help it slide over the plug and keep a good seal from moisture.
      Meh. A little oil on the threads is enough. I don't really care for dielectric grease. Because it's not grease at all. It's silicone. PITA to clean off the contacts if you ever need to change a plug or wires. Never had situation where it would have helped anything either. Especially a "top load" coil on plug engine where the plugs and boots literally NEVER see water. Unless you drive in to a lake.

    9. #7
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      There really isn't anything difficult about doing the plugs. Move what you need to to remove the coils and put it back when you're done.

    10. #8
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      So, I went to take a photo today and it isnít needed. Before I was looking at the wiring during dusk and I didnít see some additional bolts (connected to ground wires) I can loosen to give the cable some more ability to move - resolved my concern/ challenge.

      Last question - dielectric grease or not? Iím leaning toward no grease.


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    11. #9
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      Quote Originally Posted by TGO View Post
      How about posting a picture?



      Meh. A little oil on the threads is enough. I don't really care for dielectric grease. Because it's not grease at all. It's silicone. PITA to clean off the contacts if you ever need to change a plug or wires. Never had situation where it would have helped anything either. Especially a "top load" coil on plug engine where the plugs and boots literally NEVER see water. Unless you drive in to a lake.
      Different strokes for different folks, I'm super particular and careful when working on my cars and I like to go that extra mile which makes me feel better about my workmanship and my car operating as best it can for as long as it can.

      I would recommend not putting petroleum based oil on spark plug threads because the heat breaks down the impurities and that's what makes the plug stick and harder to remove later which can cause seizing and stripped threads in the head, not fun and a very expensive repair. That's why anti-seize is specifically made for spark plug threads.

      Silicone based grease is not difficult to clean off of contacts, a little parts cleaner sprayed on a shop rag or those blue shop towels, wipe, and it's clean. Perhaps not needed for "top load" coils, but I definitely recommend it for conventional plug wire boots.
      Geo-political oracle sent to fight Satan and his minions. Keep calm and boycott the NWO. "We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false". - william casey CIA Director 1981

    12. #10
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      I'll change the plugs long before any "break down." lol I put them in dry for the most part. Never had a stuck plug either way.

      The silicone grease hardens just like caulk. You're not scrubbing it out of the boots with parts cleaner and a wrag.

      I guess it's fine if you're gonna change your wires with the plugs but I wouldn't put that stuff on any of my cars where I've got good money invested in low resistance wires.

      As far as grease on conventional plug wire boots maybe. All of my cars like that are V8's and any water that gets near the plugs is gonna get boiled off from the heat of the exhaust manifold/headers really fast.

      Either way not necessary on these cars at all.

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      Cool, have fun threading steel spark plug threads into your aluminum head with no lube. I wonder what your wife would say about going in dry.
      Geo-political oracle sent to fight Satan and his minions. Keep calm and boycott the NWO. "We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false". - william casey CIA Director 1981

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      Quote Originally Posted by Caspian3.2 View Post
      Cool, have fun threading steel spark plug threads into your aluminum head with no lube. I wonder what your wife would say about going in dry.
      I put them in dry all the time, never had an issue getting them in or out.

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      So does most of the world lol

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      They make this stuff for a reason and it's cheap, plus saves future potential owners the hassle of dealing with stripped threads in the head if they ever need to change plugs.

      Geo-political oracle sent to fight Satan and his minions. Keep calm and boycott the NWO. "We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false". - william casey CIA Director 1981

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      Quote Originally Posted by Caspian3.2 View Post
      They make this stuff for a reason and it's cheap, plus saves future potential owners the hassle of dealing with stripped threads in the head if they ever need to change plugs.

      Volvo does not use anything on plugs. I couldn't even guess how many spark plugs I've changed. I have never had one damage threads. Additionally, I work with other guys and we all know when someone gets something messed up and I've never seen anyone I work with have a car with messed up spark plug threads.

      Not to mention, putting that on the threads can actually change the torque value, causing the correct torque to be too much increasing the likelihood of damaged threads.
      Last edited by Tech; 03-08-2018 at 06:55 AM.

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      For what itís worth:



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      Last edited by R-Pow3R3d; 03-07-2018 at 10:57 PM.

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      Anyone know how long this job takes. I estimate an hour. Am I close? Trying to decide if this is something I can tackle while my little one sleeps.


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      Easily under an hour. I can do them in about 10 minutes, including going to get the car and parking it when done.

    21. #19
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tech View Post
      Easily under an hour. I can do them in about 10 minutes, including going to get the car and parking it when done.
      I had a steep learning curve on the first plug. Couldnít get the socket off - was really sticking to the plug. Taped it and the tape broke. Taped the living daylights out of it and all was good. I think I took 1 hour with about 30 mins on that darn first plug.

      A few pics of the plugs with 74,500 on them.




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    22. #20
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      Thread revival - going to change the plugs in my T6 soon - what is the correct torque for them?
      Logan

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      Quote Originally Posted by Caspian3.2 View Post
      They make this stuff for a reason
      Yes, they do! They make it because they want to sell stuff.

      Caveat: I'm just a shade tree mechanic. I've used never-sieze on plugs in the past, but never will again because I have experienced the joys of installing a threaded insert in the head of my then-fiance's Renault after trying to score points by doing a DIY tune-up.

      If you do use it, don't torque to the torque spec, just try to crush the gasket by feel. Tech's comment about screwing up the torque/tension relationship is correct. The torque spec is valid for dry threads only (no oil or never-sieze).
      Last edited by Dyno; 11-02-2019 at 12:16 PM.

    24. #22
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      Quote Originally Posted by Dyno View Post
      Yes, they do! They make it because they want to sell stuff.

      Caveat: I'm just a shade tree mechanic. I've used never-sieze on plugs in the past, but never will again because I have experienced the joys of installing a threaded insert in the head of my then-fiance's Renault after trying to score points by doing a DIY tune-up.

      If you do use it, don't torque to the torque spec, just try to crush the gasket by feel. Tech's comment about screwing up the torque/tension relationship is correct. The torque spec is valid for dry threads only (no oil or never-sieze).
      As long as you make the appropriate adjustment for torque spec (reduce by 30%) there's no problem at all with using properly applied anti-seize. The problems come when people don't make the adjustment for lubricated threads and/or absolutely slather the plug with anti-seize instead of just lightly applying it.

      All of that said, I've seen no problems with spark plugs being installed dry and I completely agree with Tech that there's no need to use it on the plugs in these cars. My only issue is with saying that it only exists because the companies "want to sell stuff." It exists because it's useful in many situations when properly used; you can't really fault the product for the fact that people misuse it.
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    25. #23
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      There are spark plugs that require anti-seize on the threads. Not on a Volvo though.

    26. #24
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tech View Post
      There are spark plugs that require anti-seize on the threads. Not on a Volvo though.
      I thought that most new automotive plugs were treated/plated and didn't need it. I know that both Bosch and NGK plugs are plated and don't require anti-seize in any automotive application. I don't use other brands though, so I suppose there might still be some cheap plugs out there that require it (and probably some specialty plugs like those damn 16mm two-piece "high thread" plugs Ford used in its modular V8s too, given their history).

      But do you really think that properly applied anti-seize would be harmful for our cars? From what I can tell the concern seems to be people over-torquing due to the anti-seize being a lubricant so as long as someone made the proper adjustment to the torque values wouldn't it be perfectly fine (albeit unnecessary for us)?
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    27. #25
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      No, I don't think there would be a problem if the necessary torque adjustments are made. But like you said, it isn't by any means necessary. Volvo installs them dry. I install them dry. I couldn't even estimate how many plugs I've removed from Volvos, including factory installed ones, ones that I've installed and ones that who knows who installed. I've never once had a problem getting a single one out.

      If people want to use it, that's fine. I just have a problem with the resident nutjob, Caspian3.2, running around acting like if you don't use it you are guaranteed to trash your head when he has no idea what he is talking about.
      Last edited by Tech; 11-02-2019 at 09:28 PM.

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      Oh my, what an entertaining read. Gives me motivation to now replace my 2013 XC90s plugs which just crossed the 100K mark. No other way to get the confidence going. A DIY type of job that is not rocket science.
      2012 S60 T5 FWD & 2013 XC90 AWD

    29. #27
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      Quote Originally Posted by Veefifty T5AWD View Post
      Thread revival - going to change the plugs in my T6 soon - what is the correct torque for them?
      Sorry I revived this debate...

      Can anyone please answer my question? Torque for (dry) plugs on a T6?
      Logan

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    30. #28
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      Quote Originally Posted by Veefifty T5AWD View Post
      Quote Originally Posted by Veefifty T5AWD View Post
      Thread revival - going to change the plugs in my T6 soon - what is the correct torque for them?
      Sorry I revived this debate...

      Can anyone please answer my question? Torque for (dry) plugs on a T6?
      Sorry, I missed that post. Should be 30Nm

    31. #29
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tech View Post
      Sorry, I missed that post. Should be 30Nm
      Thanks, Tech!
      Logan

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    32. #30
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tech View Post
      No, I don't think there would be a problem if the necessary torque adjustments are made. But like you said, it isn't by any means necessary. Volvo installs them dry. I install them dry. I couldn't even estimate how many plugs I've removed from Volvos, including factory installed ones, ones that I've installed and ones that who knows who installed. I've never once had a problem getting a single one out.

      If people want to use it, that's fine. I just have a problem with the resident nutjob, Caspian3.2, running around acting like if you don't use it you are guaranteed to trash your head when he has no idea what he is talking about.
      Agreed on all points.

      For the record, the fact that I can have these kinds of intelligent and polite conversations with you (and others like p.rico) is a major reason I've stayed around this message board. I am genuinely thankful that you give us your time like this.
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    33. #31
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      Quote Originally Posted by zenmervolt View Post
      Agreed on all points.

      For the record, the fact that I can have these kinds of intelligent and polite conversations with you (and others like p.rico) is a major reason I've stayed around this message board. I am genuinely thankful that you give us your time like this.
      2012 S60 T5 - Flamenco Red, Soft/Sandstone Beige, Climate, Premium, Multimedia, Xenons, BLIS, PCC, Park Assist, Urbane Wood, TFT Retrofit

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      I was wrong, it's actually 28Nm. If you already did them to 30Nm, don't worry about it. The difference isn't going to cause problems by any means.

    35. #33
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tech View Post
      I was wrong, it's actually 28Nm. If you already did them to 30Nm, don't worry about it. The difference isn't going to cause problems by any means.
      I changed them yesterday and set them to 20 ft. lbs (27ish Nm) to be on the safe side and not over tighten. The originals (50k) loosened very easily - I doubt they were initially torqued to that spec.
      Logan

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    36. #34
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      You'll be fine. Over torque isn't going to cause a problem unless they are way over torqued.

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