ChitownV: my front end rebuild/upgrade using OEM & aftermarket parts
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    1. #1
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      ChitownV: my front end rebuild/upgrade using OEM & aftermarket parts

      I wanted to share my personal experience and set-up with using OEM and aftermarket parts to rebuild or upgrade the front end of the XC90. These are my personal opinions and hope you can benefit with real world experience, rather than heresay. After driving BMWs for 20 years I wanted more from the handling. The XC90 finally went from boring to sporty.

      If I didn't put it in the pic, the parts replaced are original Volvo. For my 3.2 engine mounts, I used all Hutchinson from FCP. I noticed on some of them, they looked exactly the same as the Volvo part, but the Volvo logo was grinded off.



      The main thing to talk about are the control arm bushings. I had replacement Meyle control arms, but when a winter sale for poly forward control arm bushings plus an addition sale on top of it came up, I jumped at the opportunity. I used original Volvo for the rearward bushings. My assessment, I love the poly control arm bushings because they remove the bushing cutouts that flex and since they pivot in the bushing rather than twist the bushing when the control arm moves up and down, the geometry is more precise without the harshness. Yeah, each time the control arm moves up or down, the front rubber bushing twists. The poly bushings were a little firm at first and it took about two weeks for the bushings to break-in. Now they are wonderful.

      For those looking to press bushings out of the old control arms, I can assume most people mainly fall between either you want the factory ride or sportier. If you are going to spend a typical $20-40 per bushing to be pressed out and replaced, I would go straight for the original Volvo or the Polyurethane ones. For bushings that carry so much load in the suspension, it is worth skipping both Meyle and Lemforder, especially if you are already going to pay for them to be pressed. Why save a few dollars when they will be on for 70-100k miles and are essential to the suspension.

      The next thing I might change are the Zimmerman brake rotors. I think they have more ferrous (iron) material because they can form light rust in humid or wet weather. This means you feel grinding first thing in the morning as the pads clean off the rotors. I might try the Ate ones next time. The Bosch rear rotors don't have the same problem and I like them.

      The last part I want to share are the subframe poly inserts. This is well documented, but if you live in an area that uses salt, I would skip the forward two inserts. The forward bolt threads are exposed to the outside elements and rust. Water and salt sit in the threaded part like a pocket, making it worse. Thus, I and others, have had these forward bolts break when trying to remove them. So, my suggestion is you can use the rearward two poly bushing inserts to help tighten things up and those rear two get most of the turning load.

      The rest of the parts are performing really well and have been documented in other threads. They are of good quality, either equal or better than Volvo in my opinion. I love this set-up and with the right alignment, it works very well. It is civilized in normal driving, but really sporty on the turns.

      The last bit that does not require parts is the alignment. I personally believe the factory rear settings are too toe'd in and this gives that front corner pushing feeling on circular highway offramps. Especially with the front end sport build, I noticed the rear was pushing straight/forward when I turned, so the trick is to reduce the factory (around) +0.17 of toe in on each side or total toe of +0.34. You can instruct the alignment shop to make it zero, or if you want a little straight line safety for the highway/towing/carrying 7 passengers/wifey/teenager, reduce it to +0.10 each side or total toe of +0.20 (still within spec range). This will improve the rear to follow the front wheels on turns and still feel stable at higher speeds.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

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    3. #2
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
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      Nice write-up, thanks for posting.
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 199k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 130k

    4. #3
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      Appreciate this sort of post, really helps give a good summary of quality stuff for the big Volvo.
      2006 XC90 V8 145k
      2004 BMW 330 XI
      2005 Ford F-150

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    6. #4
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      I hope it helps with choosing the right parts. A picture is worth a thousand words.

      I do hope someone who is using the Ate rotors can chime in on how they perform and if they also form light rust when it is humid or wet.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    7. #5
      Member RedGeminiPA's Avatar
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      Volvo doesn’t sell just the control arm bushings. At least, I could never find them when I was looking. If you want “Volvo,” you have to buy the complete arm with bushings. Lemforder is the only “aftermarket” bushings that hold up. That’s what I used, as well as others here, with no issues. Many will be keeping an eye on your poly bushings over time, as that’s most likely the best way to go for aftermarket, if they seem reliable.
      2006 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, Touring, Convenience and RSE. Silver w/ Graphite
      2014 Lincoln MKT EcoBoost Elite, Tech, Pano, 20”, Rear Captains. Pearl/Black
      Past: 2008 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, BLIS, Dynaudio, Bi-Xenon. Ember black w/ Sandstone
      2004 XC90 2.5T AWD 7-Passenger w/ Climate, Premium and Versatility packages and Xenon headlights.

    8. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post
      Volvo doesn’t sell just the control arm bushings. At least, I could never find them when I was looking. If you want “Volvo,” you have to buy the complete arm with bushings. Lemforder is the only “aftermarket” bushings that hold up. That’s what I used, as well as others here, with no issues. Many will be keeping an eye on your poly bushings over time, as that’s most likely the best way to go for aftermarket, if they seem reliable.
      Please check before posting. https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/vol...nuine-31277881

      FCP does sell original Volvo bushings. There isn't any questionability on Volvo reliability.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    9. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by ChitownV View Post
      FCP does sell original Volvo bushings. There isn't any questionability on Volvo reliability.
      Interesting. They also sell Lemforder, for half the price, and both are made in Slovakia. Coincidence?
      John C
      ---------------------
      2011 XC90 3.2 173,000 miles and counting...

    10. #8
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
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      Front bushing 31277881
      Rear bushing 31304040 (Lisle parts webstore has a note “also order 1 x 999403, 1 x 985660”, this is the rear nut/bolt).

      It’s come up a few times now.
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 199k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 130k

    11. #9
      Member RedGeminiPA's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by ChitownV View Post
      Please check before posting. https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/vol...nuine-31277881

      FCP does sell original Volvo bushings. There isn't any questionability on Volvo reliability.
      My mistake. They’re on the 2nd page. As John C said, they’re both made in the same country. Very high odds they’re the same bushings, which is why we have such high success rates with them.
      2006 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, Touring, Convenience and RSE. Silver w/ Graphite
      2014 Lincoln MKT EcoBoost Elite, Tech, Pano, 20”, Rear Captains. Pearl/Black
      Past: 2008 XC90 V8 w/ Climate, BLIS, Dynaudio, Bi-Xenon. Ember black w/ Sandstone
      2004 XC90 2.5T AWD 7-Passenger w/ Climate, Premium and Versatility packages and Xenon headlights.

    12. #10
      Member Tommm's Avatar
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      I replaced the 4C shocks in my S80 V8 with the Bilstein B4s for the same reason you put them in the XC90. I thought they would give me a slightly crisper ride than the Sachs.

      Bilsteins are supposed to weep a little bit. The right side weeps significantly more than the left, and even though I replaced everything other than the spring from the control arm up to the nut on the top of the strut I get creaking noises like I used to get on my 68 Firebird. I put Lemforder control arms in.

      Im curious to see how much fluid your B4s weep. I may replace them next year after about 40k.


      These are the brakes I put in the V8 XC90. https://www.amazon.com/Power-ESK4502...ype=automotive They have a better cold bite than the Akebono pads with Centric rotors we had on the 06 T5 XC90. But they are dirtier.

      As an aside, the S80 has 110k on it and the front pads have plenty of life. I replaced the rear pads with textar at about 60k when I bough the car 3 years ago (BMW uses textar on their regular cars, and Pagid (same manufacturer) on their M cars. Got that from a rep).
      Sincerely,
      Tom
      08 XC90 V8 - Hers
      07 S80 V8 - Shared

    13. #11
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      Quote Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post
      My mistake. They’re on the 2nd page. As John C said, they’re both made in the same country. Very high odds they’re the same bushings, which is why we have such high success rates with them.
      That is an assumption. Lemforder is a good aftermarket option to mention as this is an aftermarket and OEM thread

      However....the original Volvo only costs ~$20 more for those forward control arm bushings. Those bushings are the largest bushing (excl. subframe) in the entire vehicle and carry the most dynamic load in the suspension, responsible for the suspension geometry, the steering angles, braking, power delivery angle, absorbing bumps, taking weight from the hanging over-the-front-axle engine, and ride comfort. Switching to polyurethane bushings really revealed how much dynamic load that front bushing manages. Call it peace of mind, cheap insurance, or whatever, but for $20 I would suggest to get the original Volvo over the Lemforder.

      This is also predicated on my personal experience. A number of years ago I did a comparison of a new Lemforder part to a new original part, albeit it was a German car, and the original part had updates to it. With the long production run of the XC90, the Lemforder bushing could be based on a 2004 model while Volvo continued to make updates. It is commmon to make running updates, like how Volvo did with the wheel bearing and rear trailing arm bushing. The only way to guarantee you have the most up to date part is to get the original. Who knows if the rubber hardness, material, shape design, metal, etc. have been updated.

      It is also common to see the parts made in the same city and country because the specialized trades usually reside in those areas. There could be dozens of manufacturing plants in that specific area doing suspension parts. This is inline with places who have trade/manufacturing clusters like Shenzhen, China, or for tech start-ups in Silicon Valley.

      So we cannot assume they are the same part or even made in the same plant. For $20, it is cheap insurance to get the original Volvo part. If you are going to replace the bushings, save money on the other bushings with Lemforder, but not the vital forward control arm bushing. That is my suggestion.


      Quote Originally Posted by Tommm View Post
      I replaced the 4C shocks in my S80 V8 with the Bilstein B4s for the same reason you put them in the XC90. I thought they would give me a slightly crisper ride than the Sachs.

      Bilsteins are supposed to weep a little bit. The right side weeps significantly more than the left, and even though I replaced everything other than the spring from the control arm up to the nut on the top of the strut I get creaking noises like I used to get on my 68 Firebird. I put Lemforder control arms in.

      Im curious to see how much fluid your B4s weep. I may replace them next year after about 40k.


      These are the brakes I put in the V8 XC90. https://www.amazon.com/Power-ESK4502...ype=automotive They have a better cold bite than the Akebono pads with Centric rotors we had on the 06 T5 XC90. But they are dirtier.

      As an aside, the S80 has 110k on it and the front pads have plenty of life. I replaced the rear pads with textar at about 60k when I bough the car 3 years ago (BMW uses textar on their regular cars, and Pagid (same manufacturer) on their M cars. Got that from a rep).
      Hi TOMM,

      Shocks/struts are not suppose to weep. I don't have any weeping or creeking. Go get yours replaced via warranty.

      Oh the stories I have of Textar and Pagid pads with the brake dust caking and gunking on German cars. With the XC90 weighing hundreds of pounds heavier than and S80 and the increased weight transfer load to the front on braking, front brake pads don't last long.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    14. #12
      Member Tommm's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by ChitownV View Post
      Hi TOMM,

      Shocks/struts are not suppose to weep. I don't have any weeping or creeking. Go get yours replaced via warranty.

      Oh the stories I have of Textar and Pagid pads with the brake dust caking and gunking on German cars. With the XC90 weighing hundreds of pounds heavier than and S80 and the increased weight transfer load to the front on braking, front brake pads don't last long.
      Bilstein says it's normal and not a warranty claim.
      https://www.bilstein.com/us/en/techn...edge/warranty/
      Waranty.jpg
      "Coating of film on shock body or piston rod a completely normal occurrence not defective" Doesn't say how much. Shock was $80. Cost to remove and lay car up to get replacement is more. To get the warranty you have to send them the unit and wait. The warranty is basically worthless unless you don't mind a car on jackstands for a month or however long for an $80 part. Easier to just get 2 Sachs struts and install them. But I would also want to replace all the hardware because I don't like to reuse stuff that takes a lot of labor.
      Last edited by Tommm; 01-26-2019 at 05:03 PM.
      Sincerely,
      Tom
      08 XC90 V8 - Hers
      07 S80 V8 - Shared

    15. #13
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      Good info Tommm and I can't believe they say it's normal. If it was purchased from FCP, their lifetime warranty means you purchase a new set first and when they receive the old ones, you get the refund. That said, I never did a warranty claim on shocks or struts on any car.

      Mine don't weep with 14k miles on them. I would still purchase them again when it is time to replace. It fits my driving style.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    16. #14
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      Quote Originally Posted by Tommm View Post
      The warranty is basically worthless unless you don't mind a car on jackstands for a month or however long for an $80 part.
      Try going through the vendor. I've had new Bilsteins delivered to my door and never had to return anything. They've been very accommodating once contacted by the vendor.

      That said, if you compress them and they extend by themselves, smoothly, they're still good to go. My replacements were all due to failed bushings. Seems they aren't field replaceable any longer.
      John C
      ---------------------
      2011 XC90 3.2 173,000 miles and counting...

    17. #15
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      Since my feedback is for the 3.2L, I wanted to update this thread for the V8 and this thread https://forums.swedespeed.com/showth...=1#post7237175. Regarding the front struts, the Sachs may have been developed for the 2.5t weight and might not be suitable for the V8 weight in conjunction with the R/Sport spring settings.

      I have encountered underdamped front struts when dealing with sport springs in BMWs. When blueprinting and calculating the suspension, both the compression and rebound have to be spec'd for the spring rate and vehicle weight. The Bilstein B4 struts should have a higher compression rate and rebound rate than the Sachs and should better match the heavier V8.

      If anyone with an XC90 V8 has experience with the Sachs or Bilstein B4s could chime in, it would be useful.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    18. #16
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      Thanks. I'm glad I looked in your signature line and found this post.
      Bookmarked for later use.
      2009 XC90 3.2 AWD l Oyster Grey / Bi-Xenon / Dynaudio / BLIS / VNS / RSE / THULE Aeroblade

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      How are the Centric Posi brake pads from a dust generation perspective? I'm entering my replacement window soon. Thinking EBC or Akebono but would be willing consider other options.

      Sidenote: I knew you had posted this but I swear I couldn't find it. That's why I texted you.
      I forgot I had bookmarked it on my old Windows and I'm back on Mac, that's why I couldn't find the bookmark. LMAO!
      2009 XC90 3.2 AWD l Oyster Grey / Bi-Xenon / Dynaudio / BLIS / VNS / RSE / THULE Aeroblade

    20. #18
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      Glad you asked because I want to give updates when I can. The Centric Posi brake pads are good, but once in a while I did get the, losing some friction, when cold and wet. Not as bad as the Bosch pads. After ~5k miles, the pedal does have to be pushed more, especially when cold.

      I still would not recommend Akebonos. They work well for only 2 reasons: to reduce dust and stop well when you push 90-100% force for immediate stopping. All other times, the pedal has to be pushed much further and very little grip when cold in the morning. They also do that thing where you try to stop and it has little friction towards the beginning, then after it gets warm, it grips hard at the very end. This can feel like you are about to rear end the car in front or seem like you like to tailgate people.

      I don't have experience with EBC.

      I guess we can't win them all when it comes to brake pads. I am due in the next month or two for new front pads and rotors, so I will be updating what I do. I already decided not to use the Zimmerman rotors because of the rusting issue on the friction surface.

      The pads, I was set on getting Ate pads because their friction rating (GF) is higher than the OEMs (FE) like Pagid, Textar, Bosch, and others. But I just removed a set of Ate pads that was put on on a BMW 12 years ago because the dust was so bad and caked on. Trying to still search if Ate updated their compounds within the last 5-10 years so it dusts a little less. Others I am still considering besides Ate are Brembo (still some issues due to it being a ceramic pad), Wagner Thermoquiet Ceramic (the ceramic has a higher friction rating than their Semi-metallics and I put these on 4 different cars), and dusty Volvo.

      I was trying to understand why the Volvo XC90 was the only vehicle I experienced with the losing brake friction when cold, wet/snow, not touching the brakes for some time, issue. I know in racing we look at the backspacing between the wheel and caliper. This area could contribute to debris getting caught. Also, the caliper design, same issue of debris staying in. The XC90 also does not have brake vents to cool or helps debris (including water) get moved. So, still trying to get a basic understanding of what the cause is and which type of pads would work best.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    21. #19
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      Hmmm, good feedback.
      I noticed how soft the initial bite on the XC90's brake pads and lack of immediate stopping power is in the rain or the cold (or both).
      The duality of braking response dependent on temp & wetness is some of the worst I've ever experienced short of a Mazda B2000 I briefly owned way back in the 90's.
      2009 XC90 3.2 AWD l Oyster Grey / Bi-Xenon / Dynaudio / BLIS / VNS / RSE / THULE Aeroblade

    22. #20
      Member ggleavitt's Avatar
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      Maybe something is wrong with your truck. Headlights get fixed yet or do you just drive during the day?
      Last edited by ggleavitt; 08-19-2019 at 05:19 PM. Reason: add comment
      2005 XC90 B5254T2 019 199k
      2008 XC90 B8444S Sport 452 130k

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      Quote Originally Posted by ShadowDancer View Post
      Hmmm, good feedback.
      I noticed how soft the initial bite on the XC90's brake pads and lack of immediate stopping power is in the rain or the cold (or both).
      The duality of braking response dependent on temp & wetness is some of the worst I've ever experienced short of a Mazda B2000 I briefly owned way back in the 90's.
      Do you know what pads and rotors are in there now?
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    24. #22
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      Quote Originally Posted by ggleavitt View Post
      Maybe something is wrong with your truck. Headlights get fixed yet or do you just drive during the day?
      The headlight unexpectedly began lighting again about 6 weeks ago! The ABLs still do not function and remain locked 15º left of center.

      Chitown happened to be in town about a month ago and graciously took time out of his evening to VIDA scan it.
      I forgot what the code read though. I took a picture and accidentally deleted it during a device transfer.

      I'll have to live with it for now as I have bigger issues (shifter claw now broken) and my front tires are nearly toast.

      Quote Originally Posted by ChitownV View Post
      Do you know what pads and rotors are in there now?
      Almost 100% certain Volvo OEM. The truck was only serviced by Volvo Princeton prior to my purchase.
      2009 XC90 3.2 AWD l Oyster Grey / Bi-Xenon / Dynaudio / BLIS / VNS / RSE / THULE Aeroblade

    25. #23
      Junior Member Orange's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by RedGeminiPA View Post
      Lemforder is the only “aftermarket” bushings that hold up. That’s what I used, as well as others here, with no issues. Many will be keeping an eye on your poly bushings over time, as that’s most likely the best way to go for aftermarket, if they seem reliable.

      On my S60 I installed the smaller bushing for the control arm (the one with the vertical bolt) made by Lemforder - after 1 year it got very soft and I had to replace it. This time I put genuine Volvo. The genuine and Lemforder bushings are completely different both in appearance and initial stiffness. I would definitely stick with Genuine when buying individual bushings for the control arm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q32CuR34v6c As for the front one, for the S60 the genuine one seems to be made by Boge

      The genuine Volvo bushings cost about $70-$80 / side. Really inexpensive if one can press them in
      Last edited by Orange; 08-30-2019 at 12:25 PM.

    26. #24
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      We really should sticky this thread. There's good info here. Smart choices in parts, and it's a good jumping off point for a variety of conversations.

      How are the Lemforder ball joints holding up? I don't "want" to do my ball joints yet, but I know I'll feel stupid if I don't when I replace the lower control arms.

      Thanks!

      -Ryan
      Too many cars...
      1987 Volvo 245
      1989 Volvo 245
      1991 Volvo 745 Dog Waggin' 2.0
      1995 Volvo 945 Turbo
      2011 Volvo XC90 3.2 AWD
      2013 Volvo XC60 3.2 AWD (Wife-mobile)

    27. #25
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      Can you create a rear end build


      2010 xc90 3.2 | 2017 Prius V Five
      2010 XC90 3.2 AWD
      Somewhere in space and time

    28. #26
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      Quote Originally Posted by RyanR View Post
      We really should sticky this thread. There's good info here. Smart choices in parts, and it's a good jumping off point for a variety of conversations.

      How are the Lemforder ball joints holding up? I don't "want" to do my ball joints yet, but I know I'll feel stupid if I don't when I replace the lower control arms.

      Thanks!

      -Ryan
      The ball joints are inexpensive parts; $20 a side. Might as well replace them if you're doing the control arms. My control arm bushings are beginning to fail contributing to my tires feathering on the outer edges. It won't hold the proper camber and sits with too much negative on the fronts.

      I could probably get away with having someone press in bushings but as I have come to find out during research, Volvo uses a recycled rubber mix in an effort to be more environmentally conscience. The achilles heel is they break down at an accelerated rate especially so in a heavy XC90. The second rub is most mechanics won't warranty the work or the subsequent alignment if you only press in new bushings, so, I'll replace the LCAs and ball joints at the same time.

      That said, I have driven ChiTown's XC90 and can attest to the noticeable improvement. If you have ever driven a BWM with a M-Sport Package suspension or an Audi with an S-Line, this is what his combination comes very close to replicating. It delivers tire and road feedback through the steering wheel, tracks, and manages bumps and road imperfections more adeptly than Volvo's stock package. If you're one who prefers a more Germanic ride and handling quality, his step-by-step component selection is the way to go.

      Quote Originally Posted by dyun1dyun1 View Post
      Can you create a rear end build
      2010 xc90 3.2 | 2017 Prius V Five
      Well, if you have Nivomats, remove and then burn them. That's usually an excellent first step.
      Last edited by ShadowDancer; 08-31-2019 at 12:12 PM.
      2009 XC90 3.2 AWD l Oyster Grey / Bi-Xenon / Dynaudio / BLIS / VNS / RSE / THULE Aeroblade

    29. #27
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      Well, usually the work is majority the front for suspension issues, but stick with Volvo bushings. I have Nivomats so I don't plan on changing the shocks anytime soon.

      I might put something together because I did do work on the bushings, arms, etc. on my own and others' XC90s, but board already has many good threads for the rear.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    30. #28
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      Quote Originally Posted by ShadowDancer View Post
      The ball joints are inexpensive parts; $20 a side. Might as well replace them if you're doing the control arms. My control arm bushings are beginning to fail contributing to my tires feathering on the outer edges. It won't hold the proper camber and sits with too much negative on the fronts.

      I could probably get away with having someone press in bushings but as I have come to find out during research, Volvo uses a recycled rubber mix in an effort to be more environmentally conscience. The achilles heel is they break down at an accelerated rate especially so in a heavy XC90. The second rub is most mechanics won't warranty the work or the subsequent alignment if you only press in new bushings, so, I'll replace the LCAs and ball joints at the same time.

      That said, I have driven ChiTown's XC90 and can attest to the noticeable improvement. If you have ever driven a BWM with a M-Sport Package suspension or an Audi with an S-Line, this is what his combination comes very close to replicating. It delivers tire and road feedback through the steering wheel, tracks, and manages bumps and road imperfections more adeptly than Volvo's stock package. If you're one who prefers a more Germanic ride and handling quality, his step-by-step component selection is the way to go.



      Well, if you have Nivomats, remove and then burn them. That's usually an excellent first step.
      I thought that that they were needed for 3rd row?

      At this point, I am due for suspension refresh.


      2010 xc90 3.2 | 2017 Prius V Five
      2010 XC90 3.2 AWD
      Somewhere in space and time

    31. #29
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      I wanted to update this thread so anyone who uses it as a guide can get the most up to date info.

      More on control arm bushings and experience using different rubber brands versus polyurethane: https://forums.swedespeed.com/showth...-for-the-LCA-s

      The new iPd control arms which are rubber: https://forums.swedespeed.com/showth...st-to-try-them


      As far as the brake pads, I noticed the Centric Posi-quiet pads are soft pads so you have to push the pedal more, especially when cold. I am going to replace with Wagner Thermoquiet Ceramic pads all around and new front rotors. I will give feedback on those. I have had great results on 5 other cars with the Wagners to date so I hope they do well for the XC90 too. Very affordable pads btw.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    32. #30
      Junior Member CDN XC90's Avatar
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      I ran the Wagner Thermo Quiet semi metallics and they were poo in cold/wet.

      Switched to Jurid. Very satisfied. Won't run anything else now.
      2006 XC90 2.5T AWD - Contrast Works Stage 2 tune with Eco Enhance mode, Snabb fresh air pipe and downpipe, custom triple resonated catback, HEICO (BMC) sport air filter, Bilstein B4 front struts with HEICO rear struts and lowering springs, IPD Swaybars, strut brace conversion kit, and subframe bushing inserts. Fast FC05 20x8.5 with 255/45/20 Conti DWS06. Falken HS449 235/65/17 winters. JL 500/1 with Pioneer TS-SWX2502 subwoofer under cargo tray. LED low/hi beams, Tuxmats.

    33. #31
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      Yeah, ironically the Wagner TQ Semi-metallic has LESS friction than the Ceramic (from their own graphs from years ago). I do have first-hand experience of using the Wagner Thermoquiet Ceramic on other vehicles (BMW, Mercedes, Land Rover, Honda) and they work great in those applications both dry and winter wet. It has more bite and friction than factory supplied pads (such as Jurid & Textar). I recommended them to a friend who just took his LR3 offroad in Colorado a few weeks ago. He heated them up on downhills and drove through cold snowy days. All I heard was praise from him.

      I do like to only give real-world results. The only way to know for sure is to try them. I got the fronts on an Amazon deal for $16 and the rears go for around $32. So, cheap enough to try and give feedback.

      I have used Jurid on other European cars, but they are dirty as he**. They also cake on so it makes it extremely difficult to clean, sometimes causing permanent brake dust spots. Add if you brush the dirty wheel with a nice suit pant it stains. Not for me.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    34. #32
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      Thought I'd add the Volvo OEM brake pads I bought were neither Jurid nor Textar but was by Roulunds Braking India
      2011 XC90 B8444S R-Design 614 120k km RHD

    35. #33
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      Quote Originally Posted by kiwiV8 View Post
      Thought I'd add the Volvo OEM brake pads I bought were neither Jurid nor Textar but was by Roulunds Braking India
      It could be because you're in New Zealand. Jurid and Textar are both brands very commonly used in European vehicles. It's like saying Bosch. The brands can vary based on region, supplier contracts at the time, etc. Often for parts like brake pads or tires, there is more than one manufacturer that can be used throughout the years.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    36. #34
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      Akebono pads are phenomenal. They stop well and are basically dustless.

      -Ryan
      Too many cars...
      1987 Volvo 245
      1989 Volvo 245
      1991 Volvo 745 Dog Waggin' 2.0
      1995 Volvo 945 Turbo
      2011 Volvo XC90 3.2 AWD
      2013 Volvo XC60 3.2 AWD (Wife-mobile)

    37. #35
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      Quote Originally Posted by RyanR View Post
      Akebono pads are phenomenal. They stop well and are basically dustless.

      -Ryan
      You and I disagree on that one. I loathe those pads and had bad experiences on every car I installed them on. I put a description of how they perform earlier in this thread. Maybe you could add your own too so that people have different perspectives from different people.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 148k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

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