2016 T6 - engine failure notice
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    1. #1
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      2016 T6 - engine failure notice

      2016 XC90 T6 with 51k on it. Complete maintenance history and oil was changed regularly. Car was not beaten. Engine developed a knock that was reminiscent of a rod knock from when my SBC decided it had enough of my shenanigans. Knock was more noticeable when the engine was cold and really only on acceleration, but even when warm it could be heard. Much easier to hear on the passenger side.

      Car is currently at the dealer. They initially said it was normal. Then I went down there and had the shop foreman get in the car while I drove it. Within 10 seconds, he said "I hear it" - which made me think "no ****, idiot". Their diagnosis is that something in cyl 1 and/or 2's valvetrain is wonky. They are waiting on info from VCNA because they've never seen a failure of this sort on these engines.

      Anyway, thought I'd post here in case someone else is hearing a knock when cold. It's not normal.

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    3. #2
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      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      "no ****, idiot"
      I'm betting these techs (or "idiots" who you're asking help from) have to deal with many folks probably not as sharp nor as polite as you who come in saying "There's this sound . . ." and trying to find that proverbial needle in a haystack!
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    4. #3
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by likeXC90 View Post
      I'm betting these techs (or "idiots" who you're asking help from) have to deal with many folks probably not as sharp nor as polite as you who come in saying "There's this sound . . ." and trying to find that proverbial needle in a haystack!
      Let me expand a bit on that:
      1. Took car to dealer. Told them about the sound. They said they'd look into it. I told them that it sounded like the bottom end, but wasn't sure since I am not familiar with this particular engine.
      2. Called me later that day. Said they don't hear any knock at all. I asked them if it was cold when they drove it - they said it was. I asked them to take another listen.
      3. Called me again the next day. Said they "let it sit overnight, and then myself, my lead tech, and the service manager all went for a drive at the same time and nobody heard anything."
      4. I told my service advisor if they could look me in the eye and let me record them saying "everything is normal", I'd be happy with their diagnosis. The advisor said he would be ok with that. So I drove my ass down to the shop - 30 minutes away.
      5. Service advisor met me at the desk. I told him that every time I've heard a knock like that, it's been bad news, and as someone that's built a dozen or so 400-500 horsepower SBC's, I have heard a few bad sounds. Said he'd invited the lead tech to come out and give me the happy verdict. Tech comes out, we walk to the car. Tech says the car has been idle all day so its stone cold. I ask him to get in the passenger seat and drive up the road with me. I start the car, idle out of the parking lot, and the instant I hit the gas to merge, he says "I hear it."

      So yeah, "no ****, idiot" was a valid thought after being jerked around and wasting my time. If you've ever heard a rod knock, you'd understand my frustration. There simply is no way anyone could have been in that car and driven it cold and not heard the noise. It was loud. You could feel it in your feet on the pass side. Take a hammer and tap it against an anvil. That's rod knock, and sounded a lot like this knock. It is not a subtle sound.
      Last edited by dhodlick; 12-07-2019 at 09:47 AM.

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    6. #4
      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Let me expand a bit on that:
      1. Took car to dealer. Told them about the sound. They said they'd look into it. I told them that it sounded like the bottom end, but wasn't sure since I am not familiar with this particular engine.
      2. Called me later that day. Said they don't hear any knock at all. I asked them if it was cold when they drove it - they said it was. I asked them to take another listen.
      3. Called me again the next day. Said they "let it sit overnight, and then myself, my lead tech, and the service manager all went for a drive at the same time and nobody heard anything."
      4. I told my service advisor if they could look me in the eye and let me record them saying "everything is normal", I'd be happy with their diagnosis. The advisor said he would be ok with that. So I drove my ass down to the shop - 30 minutes away.
      5. Service advisor met me at the desk. I told him that every time I've heard a knock like that, it's been bad news, and as someone that's built a dozen or so 400-500 horsepower SBC's, I have heard a few bad sounds. Said he'd invited the lead tech to come out and give me the happy verdict. Tech comes out, we walk to the car. Tech says the car has been idle all day so its stone cold. I ask him to get in the passenger seat and drive up the road with me. I start the car, idle out of the parking lot, and the instant I hit the gas to merge, he says "I hear it."

      So yeah, "no ****, idiot" was a valid thought after being jerked around and wasting my time. If you've ever heard a rod knock, you'd understand my frustration. There simply is no way anyone could have been in that car and driven it cold and not heard the noise. It was loud. You could feel it in your feet on the pass side. Take a hammer and tap it against an anvil. That's rod knock, and sounded a lot like this knock. It is not a subtle sound.
      It'll get covered under Warranty. Don't let dealer make you pay any out of pocket here. Second, we'd all like to think our cars are given the upmost attention when inspected. The honest truth is if they don't see a problem immediately, techs aren't wanting to dig around. They're book hour people, and don't make money by test driving vehicles where an issue isn't instantly obvious.

      I'm guessing a tech hopped in the car, started it, and drove a few feet. Didn't hear a problem and figured owner would come and show them issue or if there's one it'll come back in soon when the issue is blatantly obvious.

    7. #5
      Junior Member drmanny3's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Let me expand a bit on that:
      1. Took car to dealer. Told them about the sound. They said they'd look into it. I told them that it sounded like the bottom end, but wasn't sure since I am not familiar with this particular engine.
      2. Called me later that day. Said they don't hear any knock at all. I asked them if it was cold when they drove it - they said it was. I asked them to take another listen.
      3. Called me again the next day. Said they "let it sit overnight, and then myself, my lead tech, and the service manager all went for a drive at the same time and nobody heard anything."
      4. I told my service advisor if they could look me in the eye and let me record them saying "everything is normal", I'd be happy with their diagnosis. The advisor said he would be ok with that. So I drove my ass down to the shop - 30 minutes away.
      5. Service advisor met me at the desk. I told him that every time I've heard a knock like that, it's been bad news, and as someone that's built a dozen or so 400-500 horsepower SBC's, I have heard a few bad sounds. Said he'd invited the lead tech to come out and give me the happy verdict. Tech comes out, we walk to the car. Tech says the car has been idle all day so its stone cold. I ask him to get in the passenger seat and drive up the road with me. I start the car, idle out of the parking lot, and the instant I hit the gas to merge, he says "I hear it."

      So yeah, "no ****, idiot" was a valid thought after being jerked around and wasting my time. If you've ever heard a rod knock, you'd understand my frustration. There simply is no way anyone could have been in that car and driven it cold and not heard the noise. It was loud. You could feel it in your feet on the pass side. Take a hammer and tap it against an anvil. That's rod knock, and sounded a lot like this knock. It is not a subtle sound.
      Look, I hear you are frustrated. But let me suggest that referring to the people who can make a difference with your ultimate situation does not really help you? Cars are not always easy to diagnosis. You might have a particular way of driving the car that makes the noise more apparent. Bottom line this should be a joint effort to establish the problem and then seek the solution. And from what you have said the dealership was very accommodating in trying to hear the problem. Given that you are out of warranty (51,000 miles) I would strongly suggest you treat these people with the respect that they deserve. If you piss them off they can make it very difficult for you to get what you want (Your car back in operational condition). You also mention that the car was not beaten? How would I know that for sure. It is your interpretation of how you drive. Complete maintenance history might mean one thing to one person and another to someone else. If this dealership did all the required maintenance then I would say you are in good shape as they will not question the maintenance. If you did it or your local Jiffy lube then they have a right to validate all was done correctly. Did you tow things? If so that would change the maintenance focus. I am not saying you do not deserve your day in the service department. I am just saying be cool and bring some Zen back to the equation. Are you the original owner? That can make a big difference in good will situations. I am willing to bet that things will work out for you.
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    8. #6
      Junior Member drmanny3's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by MyVolvoS60 View Post
      It'll get covered under Warranty. Don't let dealer make you pay any out of pocket here. Second, we'd all like to think our cars are given the upmost attention when inspected. The honest truth is if they don't see a problem immediately, techs aren't wanting to dig around. They're book hour people, and don't make money by test driving vehicles where an issue isn't instantly obvious.

      I'm guessing a tech hopped in the car, started it, and drove a few feet. Didn't hear a problem and figured owner would come and show them issue or if there's one it'll come back in soon when the issue is blatantly obvious.
      Right on!
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    9. #7
      Quote Originally Posted by drmanny3 View Post
      Look, I hear you are frustrated. But let me suggest that referring to the people who can make a difference with your ultimate situation does not really help you? Cars are not always easy to diagnosis. You might have a particular way of driving the car that makes the noise more apparent. Bottom line this should be a joint effort to establish the problem and then seek the solution. And from what you have said the dealership was very accommodating in trying to hear the problem. Given that you are out of warranty (51,000 miles) I would strongly suggest you treat these people with the respect that they deserve. If you piss them off they can make it very difficult for you to get what you want (Your car back in operational condition). You also mention that the car was not beaten? How would I know that for sure. It is your interpretation of how you drive. Complete maintenance history might mean one thing to one person and another to someone else. If this dealership did all the required maintenance then I would say you are in good shape as they will not question the maintenance. If you did it or your local Jiffy lube then they have a right to validate all was done correctly. Did you tow things? If so that would change the maintenance focus. I am not saying you do not deserve your day in the service department. I am just saying be cool and bring some Zen back to the equation. Are you the original owner? That can make a big difference in good will situations. I am willing to bet that things will work out for you.
      Exactly. Techs are like lawyers. They don't mind checking out a problem and giving advice, but they aren't going to dig into an issue without getting paid. OP probably wasn't rude, as he "thought they were idiots", but tact is important right now. The car is at 51,000 and he doesn't need Volvo to be a dick.

      Op needs to tick to facts and get everything resolved. If serviced 100% at Volvo, great. If OP has maintenance records from elsewhere, keep them. Pretty OP needs Volvo's help right now and the last thing he'd want is to alienate people making the decisions.

    10. #8
      Junior Member drmanny3's Avatar
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      One last comment. While we as forum participants read all of this stuff, I bet that Volvo Corporate as well as some dealers also read this stuff. Always if possible present your self as a loyal Volvo customer who is seeking assistance. It is much easier to help someone who is need as opposed to someone who is insulting you as they ask for assistance. Just saying.... I have not had a bottom end failure since I had a 1970 Jaguar Sedan. What causes a crank journal bearing to go south can be a lot of things. Excessive heat, insufficient oil, or dirty oil, defective bearing, out of tolerance, improper torque. I bet Tech and the other mechanics have some expertise in this.
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    11. #9
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      augh....sounds like my problem right now. I have another volvo v60 that have the door handle and a couple of other sensors that is not stored on the computer. I have video and picture proof and it is "not good enough". Today, i have the problem that is showing up and it was at the dealer. the Service manager who is booking appts today, refused to even see the car to show him and for him to acknowledge that he is seeing what I am seeing. He won't even let a tech see it as it is currently happening because there is no "qualified techs" available to diagnose it. I asked how about just connecting to VIDA and he said they can't even do that.

      I heard issues from other customers about this service manager but the advisors were great. Here in Toronto area, there is very little volvo dealers (9 in total and they are spread out in GTA).

      I really really wish that other manufacturers use the LEXUS service model. I have had many interactions with lexus due to my parent's car and their service is far more superior than what other car manufacturers have offered.

    12. #10
      Junior Member drmanny3's Avatar
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      Types of Engine Bearing Damage



      Engine bearings both reduce friction between the rotating part of the engine and the stationary part and support the crank. The bearing material must be extremely strong because of the stresses caused by the explosions inside the internal combustion engine. Reducing friction is accomplished in part by the fact that dissimilar metals slide against each other with less friction and wear than similar materials will.
      Figure 1: Overplated copper alloy bearing gouged by cast iron debris. Inset photo shows the microscopic detail of the gouges.So an alloy bearing material does a much better job of keeping a steel crankshaft moving than a steel or cast iron bearing does.

      Although the material itself may give the engine bearing some friction-reducing properties, its performance is enhanced by a lubricant between the moving and stationary surfaces. Another of the bearing’s duties is to establish and maintain a film of oil.
      Figure 2: Babbitt bearing embedded with machining debris. The inset photo shows microscopic detail of the debris.The bearings usually do a very good job at keeping the moving parts moving; however, when a bearing fails, the results can be catastrophic.
      Figure 3: This aluminum bearing was damaged by embedment of glass beads. This photo shows the extent of the damage.Even when they fail, it’s usually not the bearing’s fault. With a bit of investigation, an engine specialist or technician can discover and eliminate one of literally dozens of reasons for premature wear or failure.

      Dirt or Debris

      Debris, such as dirt or dust, can cause significant damage to a bearing surface. If it’s in the lubrication system, dirt will usually leave circumferential scratches and will often remain lodged in the bearing’s surface.
      Figure 4: Foreign particles in the bearing lining may be the result of improper cleaning or a failure to replace the filter and may include road dirt and sand.Be sure to always flush the lubrication system thoroughly before reassembling an engine to avoid engine bearing damage.
      Another way dirt can play havoc is if the engine components aren’t completely clean. A foreign particle trapped between the bearing back and the housing will cause a raised area in the bearing.
      This little hump can lead to contact between the bearing and the crank journal. You should always ensure the bearings are installed in clean surfaces.
      Insufficient Lubrication

      A complete lack of lubrication in the crankcase usually leads to seizure of the bearing and total failure of the engine. But, experts say a more frequent issue regarding lubrication is simply inadequate oiling. The absence of a proper oil film will result in metal-to-metal contact, occasionally to just one bearing or often to a number of them.
      Figure 5: Lubrication is vital. This shows the result of a dry start. The bearings on the left, furthest from the oil pump have the most wear.When the bearing is damaged by oil starvation, you’ll find a very shiny surface and evidence of wiping.
      Remember, the failure of the oil film can be seen in a variety of ways on the bearings. Check on such things as blocked oil passages, a malfunctioning oil pump, improper bearing selection or installation, oil seal failures, fuel dilution (often caused by blowby of fuel and air past the piston rings) or foaming or aeration, caused, ironically, by an overfilled crankshaft.
      Misassembly

      Sometimes, failures are the result of simple installation errors. For example, if a bearing half without an oil hole is improperly put into a position where the hole is needed, that journal will receive no lubrication.
      Figure 6: Low oil supply or oil starvation doesn’t just sound bad, it does bad things inside the engine.Other types of assembly errors may also be seen. If a connecting rod or main bearing cap is installed in the wrong position, or a bearing isn’t set into place securely, lubrication will be insufficient and cause failure.
      Careful installation procedures are, of course, critical in every aspect of engine building — careless errors are always expensive.
      Bearing Crush

      The term “crush” refers to the outward force created by the portion of the bearing that extends above the housing bore when the bearing halves are set into place. This “extra” material holds the outside diameter of the bearings firmly against the housing bore when the assembly is torqued to specification.
      By increasing the surface contact between the bearing and connecting rod housing bore, crush minimizes bearing movement, helps to compensate for bore distortion and aids in heat transfer.
      Figure 7: Too rich a mixture or blowby past the piston ring can lead to dilution of the oil. This damage can be seen here.In simple terms, bearing crush is what holds the bearing in place. Think of it as putting 10 pounds of something into a five-pound bag. The tang or locator tab on the shell that fits the saddle is only for locating the bearing during assembly.
      When crush is correct, slightly elliptical bearing shells conform to a perfect circle when they’re torqued into place. In this way, the crankshaft rotates properly.
      However, when there is excessive crush, the additional compressive force causes the bearing to bulge inward at the parting lines causing side pinch.
      Excessive crush may be the result of an attempt to reduce oil consumption by filing down the bearing cap, assembling the bearing caps too tightly by over-torquing the fasteners or, in some cases, using too few shims.
      Insufficient crush, on the other hand, will result in bearings that are not held securely in the bore, and remain free to move back and forth within the housing.
      Figure 8: Excessive wear seen near the parting lines of upper and lower shells was caused by bearing cap shift. This results in metal-to-metal contact and excessive pressure-causing deterioration.Because contact between the bearing back and housing bore is necessary for cooling, this condition means heat transfer away from the bearing is impeded, resulting in overheating and deterioration of the bearing surface.
      Insufficient crush may be caused by the improper attempt to achieve a better fit by filing the parting faces, by dirt or burrs holding the bearing caps open, improperly torquing the fasteners during installation, improperly sizing the housing bore or (if needed) using too many shims in the assembly process.
      Figure 9: Fillet ride occurs if the radius of the fillet in the corner of each crank journal is larger than needed. The edges of the bearing can then ride on those fillets rather than fitting neatly between them.Other Clues to Bearing Failure

      – Shiny areas will be seen on the back of the bearing due to its rubbing back and forth. In some cases, discoloration may be seen where oil has worked its way between the two surfaces and burned.
      – Overloading may be caused by vehicle operator error. Excessive idling can result in an oil film that can’t support the load needed.
      – Engine lugging can distort the crankcase and/or crankshaft, affecting the connecting rod and/or main bearings.
      – Hot rodding, or forcing excessive loads, can similarly affect the bearings. Engine tuning and operating conditions should always be followed and appropriate bearing materials chosen for the application.
      A vehicle that leaks oil has its share of issues. But, some vehicle owners who have cars or trucks that do not leak oil are in an even more potentially serious situation. At least the leaker lets you know it needs oil added now and then, with fresh oil maintaining its levels.
      The engine that seems to be leak-free can be overlooked, yet after a certain amount of time, the oil begins to degrade. The acids in the oil then attack the bearing surface.
      Proper selection of bearings will go a long way toward a successful engine build. And checking assembled bearing clearances to make sure the bearings are not too tight or too loose should always be done as a final check to make sure oil clearances are within the desired range for the engine.
      Figure 10: When there is excessive crush, the additional compressive force causes the bearing to bulge inward at the parting lines causing side pinch.Attention to the machining and material selection processes at the front end should help reduce the chance of bearing failure down the road. But should those mysterious bearing failures occur, you should easily be able to find the cause.
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    13. #11
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      Please reference this sentence:
      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Within 10 seconds, he said "I hear it" - which made me think "no ****, idiot". .
      I didn't know that Swedespeed had evolved into the home of the thought police. Now you're all getting in my grille because I thought someone was an idiot for wasting my time and needing me to hold their hand to get the noise to repeat - and I shared that thought with this forum. It's not a capitol offense to be pissed off at being run around the block by a dealer in regard to a diagnosis. This thread isn't about how I dealt with the shop. That's between me and the shop. My time is valuable and it was wasted. If yours isn't - so be it. You do you. To-date, I've been nothing but patient and cool with the shop because I know how the sausage is made. The engine failure is NOT their fault. The way they handle it IS.

      Loyalty has no bearing here. It doesn't matter if this was my first Volvo, or my... let's see.... seventh. No, eighth. Car makes bad sound. Car is taken to dealer. Dealer says no sound. Owner says try again. Dealer says they did. No Sound. Owner says look me in the eye and tell me it's normal. Dealer agrees. Owner takes off of work, trucks down there and goes for a ride with seasoned tech. Tech says "Oh...THAT knock..." after literally 10 seconds in the car.

      If you'd still be in great spirits after all of that and not thinking less-than-nice-things, you're a better man than I, and I am not afraid to admit it.

      This thread is about a problem with the engine in an impeccably maintained and easily driven car, with full dealer service records since new. As for any goodwill fixing by Volvo, the car is under a full warranty till 100k, so they are going to take care of it. Once they reply back with the diagnosis, I will update the thread so that future searchers can get some assistance.

      ...and maybe step away from the mantle of "thought police".
      Last edited by dhodlick; 12-07-2019 at 04:26 PM.

    14. #12
      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Please reference this sentence:

      I didn't know that Swedespeed had evolved into the home of the thought police. Now you're all getting in my grille because I thought someone was an idiot for wasting my time and needing me to hold their hand to get the noise to repeat - and I shared that thought with this forum. It's not a capitol offense to be pissed off at being run around the block by a dealer in regard to a diagnosis. This thread isn't about how I dealt with the shop. That's between me and the shop. My time is valuable and it was wasted. If yours isn't - so be it. You do you. To-date, I've been nothing but patient and cool with the shop because I know how the sausage is made. The engine failure is NOT their fault. The way they handle it IS.
      Woooh Nelly. No one is judging you for being upset. Everyone is just telling you to take a step back, because approaching the situation angry won't hasten the resolution. You can think the dealership is dumb as a box of rocks, and that's fine. But when dealing with everyone, be extra courteous. Kindness will win you far more than it loses.

      I'd go to the Dealership on Monday and speak to the General Manager. Let him know what took place and what needs done. Getting the General Manager on your side will make the process far more seamless. It's he and service manager who are going to be convincing Volvo to get things covered.

      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Loyalty has no bearing here. It doesn't matter if this was my first Volvo, or my... let's see.... seventh. No, eighth. Car makes bad sound. Car is taken to dealer. Dealer says no sound. Owner says try again. Dealer says they did. No Sound. Owner says look me in the eye and tell me it's normal. Dealer agrees. Owner takes off of work, trucks down there and goes for a ride with seasoned tech. Tech says "Oh...THAT knock..." after literally 10 seconds in the car.
      Listen, we understand you are upset. I've had my fair share of headbangers. What you're failing to grasp is that 51,000 miles might as well be 100,000. Unless you complained about the issue BEFORE 50,000 and it's documented, you are out of warranty and at Volvo's Mercy.

      So you can rant and rave at the dealer, and get no where. Change Dealers, and hope another is "less incompetent" by your standard. Or take a breath, move past the dealer missing the issue, and realize the problem has now been found. Whilst working hand in hand to achieve a resolution

      Choice is yours....

      I've helped dozens of people on here get results, and I'll tell you from my experience and that of others, loyalty matters. Like it or not.

      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      If you'd still be in great spirits after all of that and not thinking less-than-nice-things, you're a better man than I, and I am not afraid to admit it.

      This thread is about a problem with the engine in an impeccably maintained and easily driven car, with full dealer service records since new. As for any goodwill fixing by Volvo, the car is under a full warranty till 100k, so they are going to take care of it. Once they reply back with the diagnosis, I will update the thread so that future searchers can get some assistance.

      ...and maybe step away from the mantle of "thought police".
      This is great news. Are you the original owner? Have all your services 10-50K been done at Volvo? These are reasons WHY you'll get engine repaired / replaced. Volvo can look at service history and say, this guy didn't send his car to a back yard mechanic. While it's your right, Volvo can absolve themselves of all responsibility after 50K, or once your warranty terms.

      Do you have the OLD CPO 7 yr / 100K? Or did you buy extended warranty?

    15. #13
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by MyVolvoS60 View Post
      Woooh Nelly. No one is judging you for being upset. Everyone is just telling you to take a step back, because approaching the situation angry won't hasten the resolution. You can think the dealership is dumb as a box of rocks, and that's fine. But when dealing with everyone, be extra courteous. Kindness will win you far more than it loses.
      Please note:
      To-date, I've been nothing but patient and cool with the shop because I know how the sausage is made.
      I have not said or done anything even remotely ugly to the tech, the service advisor, or anyone else I've been dealing with. I thought this forum would be more interested in the engine failure of a 100% documented dealer-serviced XC90 T6. Instead, I make the terrible mistake of mentioning how I was feeling and what I thought - thought within the confines of my think-factory - and suddenly that's the focus of the vast majority of the replies here. Lesson learned. No more feelings or thoughts in posts. Got it.

      Quote Originally Posted by MyVolvoS60 View Post
      Do you have the OLD CPO 7 yr / 100K? Or did you buy extended warranty?
      Oh, we're back on topic now? Cool. I bought the extra/additional VIP warranty at the time of purchase. The coverage goes to 10 years and over 100k (120k, I think.) The only things NOT covered are wear items.

    16. #14
      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Please note:

      I have not said or done anything even remotely ugly to the tech, the service advisor, or anyone else I've been dealing with. I thought this forum would be more interested in the engine failure of a 100% documented dealer-serviced XC90 T6. Instead, I make the terrible mistake of mentioning how I was feeling and what I thought - thought within the confines of my think-factory - and suddenly that's the focus of the vast majority of the replies here. Lesson learned. No more feelings or thoughts in posts. Got it.
      And the Oscar for Dramatics goes to.....

      Look I understand YOU HAVEN'T said anything disparaging to the dealer's personnel. I was merely advising you to keep it that way and to stick with the facts. I've had multiple WTF moments with Volvo dealers. Sh*T the dealer I purchased my car lost part of my payment ($15K check), couldn't be bothered to pick up the phone and call me, then had me standing at the BMV for 4 hours looking like a jackass. All because instead of making a phone call to find out why there was a $15K deficit on the car, they demanded the title be overnighted from the BMV back to the dealer. Worst of it all, is the Finance Department HAD MY CHECK, but it got lost / misplaced / god knows when sent up to Finance Manager for processing!

      FYI: This was out of state purchase.

      So trust me man... You want infuriating, that took the cake... I handled it like an adult and wound up with a $4,000 apology. Prepaid Maintenance + Wear to 100K. My choice on how to make things right. Otherwise, I let them know very polite, but pragmatically, send the truck back up here 1500 miles and you can come get your car.

      Quote Originally Posted by dhodlick View Post
      Oh, we're back on topic now? Cool. I bought the extra/additional VIP warranty at the time of purchase. The coverage goes to 10 years and over 100k (120k, I think.) The only things NOT covered are wear items.
      These warranties exclude consumption issues. Not sure if any other exclusions regarding engine. Either way, I suspect Volvo will solve this one. Albeit it's going to be a massive headache getting there. Hope they've given you a loaner. If not, request one.
      Last edited by MyVolvoS60; 12-07-2019 at 07:59 PM.

    17. #15
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      Update: Dealership now says it is not the valvetrain and is instead something in the bottom end. Their suspicion is that the balance shaft assembly has gone belly-up, so they've ordered the entire assembly and will give that a shot. A smart mechanic would pull the rod caps and maybe even the mains to check the bearings since the balance shaft assy is apparently in the same neighborhood, but time will tell what they decide to do.

    18. #16
      Junior Member dhodlick's Avatar
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      Update: balance shaft assembly replaced. No change in noise. Dealer has requested Volvo come out and tell them what the next step should be.

    19. #17
      Junior Member drmanny3's Avatar
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      I would have thought just from your description that it was a journal. However, these engines are complex and Volvo probably wanted to try what might have been a lesser of evils and something that they had seen before. Once you open the bottom up and start replacing journals you may find that the crank is scored which would then end up becoming a major bottom up rebuild. Once you tare into the engine I imagine that the costs go up significantly. The good news is that they are trying to repair the car. As a side note our 2 liter engines seem to be pretty solid generally speaking from what I hear and see in the forum posts. There were some spark plug issues, but overall the engines have done well. I am sure you will end up being a happy camper in the end. What did they give you as a loaner?
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