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    1. #36
      Member mgm7890's Avatar
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      Replacing 3.2 Timing Chain Cover Gaskets, Chain & Various O-Rings.

      Issue: Oil leak coming from Outer/Inner Timing Chain gasket. I decided to refresh everything in this area since I was already in there.

      I'm not going to detail how to remove the accessory drive belt, accessory tensioner, accessory idler, AC Compressor, PS Pump, water pump, water pump coupler, or decoupler pulley. All of these have been detailed in other threads.

      REMOVAL

      To start, you need to do the following:

      1) Disconnect power from battery (-)
      2) Drain Coolant
      3) Remove air cleaner assembly
      4) Remove air charge pipe
      5) Disconnect positive terminal in engine bay to fuse relay box
      6) Remove vacuum pump
      7) Release accessory tensioner tension and put 3mm rod into tensioner to keep it loose
      8) Remove PS Pump from water pump coupler
      9) Remove Water Pump
      10) Remove accessory Idler
      11) Move AC Compressor to side and remove AC auxillary bracket.
      12) Remove coolant pipe that goes around outer timing case. Just give it a nice pull, or use a piece of wood to pry it out. It is held into the timing chain cover by an O-Ring. You should replace this O-ring
      13) Remove decoupler pulley (you need a special tool for this. It's a 33 tooth counterhold that goes into the pulley, and a T50 torx that goes in the middle to access the bolt.

      Now starts relevant information. You can do these next steps in any order, but I did them the following way.

      14) Lock the crankshaft
      NOTE: The genuine Volvo special tool has an offset center to match the offset insert hole on the crankshaft. The aftermarket tool does not have this offset extrusion. It's not a big deal because you know the crank will have to be turned 180° if you can't insert your camshaft tool.




      To insert the tool, you need to pry off the cover. Just put a hole in the middle and pry it out. Then, you can put the tool on. The tool has a pin held by a spring. It'll only go into the hole when it can. Just rotate the crank by hand using your 1/2" ratchet in the special tool, and it'll pop in.

      15) Lock cams

      To insert the cam locking tool, you need to remove the coolant reservoir. Just pull it up and move it to the side. Then, you need to remove the engine's upper torque arm and cover. Next, pop a hole in the middle of each cap on each camshaft, and pry it off. Then, insert the tool. It should slide right in with no issues if your crank is locked properly. Do not force the cam locking tool on! It has offset grooves that should drop in. Once the tool is seated in the slots, thread each bolt in. The exhaust cam bolt is tight, but it will fit. You may need to jack the engine up a tad, and it helps the place the bolt into the tool while putting it into the exhaust cam. Tighten up both bolts and then tighten the center bolt between the two camshafts on the tool.




      Now the engine is locked and you don't have to worry about messing up timing! Don't touch it.

      16) Remove Outer Cover

      There are 20 torx T40 bolts, and two 10mm head bolts to remove. The numbers on the bolts are only relevant for installation. The order doesn't matter for removal. I removed all torx bolts first, then removed the two hex bolts. You'll hear cracking as you do this. Don't panic, it's just the metal gasket expanding. Pull the cover off, it should slide right off the READ shaft. At this time, it's good to remove the oil seal that goes around the READ shaft that is now such inside the timing cover. Knock that out - you'll be replacing it with a new one.






      17) Lock Tensioner

      First, insert a small flat head into the tensioner lock plate and pry it up. This will unlock it so you can move the tensioner down to relieve tension on the chain. Then, you need to push down on the lower chain guide bar. This will force oil out of the tensioner. Once it is at the bottom, insert a 3mm rod into the small locking hole.




      18) Remove intake and exhaust cam pulleys

      First, make sure you know which pulley goes where. It's pretty obvious, but if you mix it up, the intake has a slot for the vacuum pump. Then, you need to position the special counterhold tools. They are keyed and only fit on their respective hub. Just insert them and move their orientation around until you can place the nut over the threaded bolt that connects both tools. Then, tighten down the bolt to lock them in.

      Now, insert your long T60 torx bit into the hub of your choice. Make sure your counterhold is fully on the pulleys and is locked. At this time, use a long breaker bar to gently loosen each cam bolt. They aren't torqued that much, so they should come right off. Once the bolts are off, throw them out. At the very least replace the exhaust bolt. It's TTY, and is it really worth chancing all this on a $2 bolt?




      19) Remove Chain

      Slowly move the hubs off and now you can remove the chain. Just pull it off and maneuver it off. It may get hung up on the READ shaft gear, but use a plastic stick to help move the chain to get off it.



      20) Remove Chain Tensioner

      It's held on by two bolts, just remove those and it'll pop off.

      21) Remove Chain Guides

      Two of the three are keyed with hidden plastic ridges. Carefully pry up each corner of the top two guides. Then, it'll slide off the cover. To remove the larger bottom one, flip the cover over. There is a roll pin with a small snap ring on it. Remove the snap ring, and it'll slide off. Then the guide can be removed.



      22) Remove Intermediate Timing Cover Gasket

      Remove the bolt for the oil slinger, and the other bolt. Then it can be removed and replaced.



      23) Loosen Coolant Pipe on Back of Engine

      There are two studs on each side of the rear of the engine that hold down the coolant pipe that goes there. Remove these two bolts, and then remove the 10mm head hex bolt that connects the coolant pipe to the inner timing cover. The pipe needs to be popped out of the cover.



      24) Remove Inner Cover

      Surprisingly, the inner cover is only held on by 2 T40 bolts. Remove those, and it should come off. If it doesn't, grab a dead blow hammer and gently tap it off near the READ shaft. It should start to break it's seal. Once it starts to come off, take a plastic trim tool or that, and help release it all off. Then, slowly wiggle it off. If it is stuck, it is stuck on an O-Ring that connects the water pump pipe to the engine. Just keep rocking it back and forth, and it should come off fully.



      25) Remove Inner Cover Gasket

      This gasket may leave a residue on the engine because it has rubber channels on it. Scrap it all off carefully with a razor blade if so.



      26) Remove All Gaskets and O-rings

      Now is a good time to replace all of these. There is a gasket on the READ shaft to replace, as well as a gasket on the inner cover below where the READ shaft goes. Then, replace the water pump pipe O-Ring that is probably stuck to the inner timing cover. Replace the O-Ring on the coolant pipe that goes into the inner timing cover behind the engine.



      27) Clean Area

      Get the area all clean and looking new to get it ready to be reinstalled.

      INSTALLATION

      Time to put it back together! Installation post is on its way. Stay tuned. I had a part ordering complication and am awaiting new ones. The process is this in reverse, but there are a few special tools involved.
      Last edited by mgm7890; 02-01-2020 at 02:08 PM.
      2005 S40 2.4i

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    3. #37
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      This is a nice write-up and very helpful to people. Thank you for the update and look forward to seeing the completed project.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 150k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    4. #38
      Member mgm7890's Avatar
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      Does it matter how the new chain is placed on? I notice that one link on one side of the chain, is a different color. You can see it in the photo here.

      I'm not seeing any orientation of the chain or hubs, so I would think they can go on any way. Is that correct?

      2005 S40 2.4i

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    6. #39
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      Never heard of a directional chain on a car, just needing the removable link to face the correct way. But I could be wrong.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 150k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    7. #40
      Member mgm7890's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by ChitownV View Post
      Never heard of a directional chain on a car, just needing the removable link to face the correct way. But I could be wrong.
      I agree. Wouldn't make sense, but I thought it was odd this one link on one side of the chain was colored differently.
      2005 S40 2.4i

    8. #41
      Member mgm7890's Avatar
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      Time to install!

      Installation is pretty straight forward.

      To start, you need to place the new inner gasket on. You can place it in place and there is a little positioning pin on the right hand side that holds it in place. Then, you need to place the inner cover on. To help the gasket not move out of position, I threaded in a few turns two of the longer bolts. This helped the gasket stay aligned while the cover was placed over it.



      I'm not going to lie, it doesn't go on easily. I lubed up the water pump o-ring and that one went on easily, but the gasket over the intermediate gear was tough. I lubed it with motor oil, and the cover still did not want to go on.



      To get it on, I placed a block of wood to brace the portion of the cover near the water pump, and then used a rubber mallet to gently tap the cover on until it was flush.

      [Don't forget to change this O-ring]


      After that, you need to screw in two T40 bolts. One that goes through the timing chain tensioner arm, and another one under that.



      Then, slacken the two alignment screws on the cover by two turns with a 9mm hex key.

      Next, you are going to reassemble the chain and pulleys.



      First, place the chain carefully over the intermediate shaft and drape it over the tensioner arm. Then, while pulling the chain taut, place it around the intake pulley and slide the pulley into the shaft a bit. Finally, take the slack up off the chain with the exhaust pulley. You may need to move the intake off the shaft a bit to allow for the chain to fully go over the exhaust.

      At this point, slide both pulleys on, and then thread both bolts for the pulley on HAND TIGHT. Do NOT tighten them all the way. You want the tensioner to take up the slack first.

      Once the bolts are hand tight, remove the pin from the tensioner and it should fully extend to take up slack. To help it, you can pull the tensioner arm upwards and you may be able to make the tensioner extend one more "click". The tensioner is controlled by oil pressure, so it will tighten up once you start the engine and oil flows.



      Once the tensioner is removed, place the pulley installation tools on again to prevent the pulleys from moving. Tighten the intake pulley first to 110Nm, then the exhaust to 75Nm + 90°.



      Then, remove the cam locking tool, and rotate the engine over twice using the crankshaft special tool. You want to make sure there is no binding, and you have 6 compressions felt.

      At this time, make sure you have removed the intermediate shaft seal from the cover, and get your new outer timing cover gasket out. Align the new gasket over the outer timing cover, and you will notice that 3 spots on the gasket have "wings" on them to allow a bolt to go into those holes and keep the gasket in place while you fit the cover. The three positions are shown in the below photo. DO NOT tighten these three screws, just thread them in a few turns, and then fix the other two special positioning tools. One goes into the intake pulley when the vacuum pump bolts on, and the other slips over the intermediate shaft. You may need a rubber mallet to hit the tool in that goes over the intermediate pulley. Once these two positioning tools are in place, the gasket should be lined up and pretty close to being in.


      Install the three T40 bolts shown below.

      Tighten the outer bolts in the order shown. It goes anti-clockwise from short bolts to long bolts around it.



      Tighten the two positioning hex bolts to HAND TIGHT with a 9mm key. These are meant to just brace the cover when in use. As you see, the inner cover is much smaller than the outer cover. The hex bolts are used to alleviate added stress, and to help it stay uniform across three different pieces.

      Install the two 10mm head bolts that thread into the hex positioning bolts.



      Install the coolant pipe, auxillary belt idler pulley, and vacuum pump.

      Now, you need install a new intermediate shaft gasket with the special tool. Place the cone onto the tool, and push the new seal onto the tool. Next, remove the cone by unthreading it. Take the tool, and now thread it into the intermediate shaft. Once hand tight and flush to the shaft, take the tool and slide the body of it to transfer the seal to the shaft. To bottom it out, thread the nut until it no longer turns, and you have installed the seal! Just unthread the tool and you are all done with it.







      To install the auxiliary bracket, you need to use a special tool to make sure it is lined up properly with the other pulleys. Start with the two pieces apart, and only hand tighten the top bolt with the convex washer below it.



      Then, place the lower brace on, and hand tighten in the two bottom bolts and top two.



      Then torque down the top bolt.


      Next, tighten the hex set screw on the right to make contact with the bracket.


      Then tighten the screw into it.


      Tighten the bottom bracket bolts.


      Tighten the bottom bracket set screw until it makes contact.


      Then tighten the bolt into the set screw.


      Reinstall the rear coolant pipe.

      Install new rear cam covers and crankshaft cover.

      Install upper engine torque rod and cover.

      Fill engine with coolant and check for leaks.

      Reinstall tensioner on accessory bracket, and other accessory drive components and you're done!

      The job was not that hard. The VIDA instructions are very self explanatory - that's why I included those. They are probably better than I could word it. Also, the video series on YouTube about these engines is very helpful!
      2005 S40 2.4i

    9. #42
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      Thank you for the write-up, pics, and update!
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 150k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

    10. #43
      Member Oceans60R's Avatar
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      Nice write-up. I remember my first 3.2 teardown in 2007. A brand new XC90 and was leaking oil right off the delivery truck. Leak was from the O-ring you have labeled "Don't forget this o-ring". Reason it was leaking iirc was the case adjustment set screw was not properly set. Its the little hex adjustment in the picture just below the oring in this pic. When the engine was assembled that adjuster not being properly set allowed the o-ring to smash and tear.
      Last edited by Oceans60R; 04-01-2020 at 07:11 PM.
      2011 S60 T6 Ember Black/Off Black, P* Tune, TDI-Tuning Box, DO88 Intercooler, IPD DP, Simons Sport Exhaust, IPD rear sway bar, H&R Springs, Bilstein B8's, 19" Polestar Wheels, 90mm Wheel Studs

    11. #44
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      For this old man doing this job would be way to much work, especially without the necessary tools on hand. The car goes bye-bye if that needs to be done. Nice write up for those willing to try.
      07 XC90 3.2

    12. #45
      Member mgm7890's Avatar
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      Update: 7k miles later and the engine is nice and dry with no oil loss! My guess is the inner gasket is what was leaking above the R.E.A.D.

      Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
      2005 S40 2.4i

    13. #46
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      Good Work! And thanks for the update.
      2008 XC90 3.2 AWD - 150k miles, Premium, Versatility 7 passenger, Climate, Convenience, retrofit Morimoto D2S HID bi-xenon, iPd swaybars & poly bushing inserts, Powerflex poly control arm bushings, Bilstein Touring Fr struts, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus 255/55R18, Fr Infinity tweeters & speakers, hardwired cheap $17 Amazon Bluetooth to center console aux & pwr, CQuartz UK 3.0 ceramic coated, no oil consumption using Mobil 1 0W-40 even w/ my lead foot

      About the XC90 3.2 - The good, the bad, and the ugly
      Upgrade front end rebuild with OEM, aftermarket, and original parts
      The better transmission JWS 3309/T-IV fluid for your 5 or 6 speed
      Strut Recommendations based on your specific XC90
      Why it's better to use synthetic oil instead of conventional

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