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    1. #1
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      XC90 2022 Recharge

      My lease is over in 2022 and I am wondering what the new SPA2 XC90 will offer. I would like to get a fully electric vehicle next, but I am not sure the XC90 Recharge will be ready then and I am concerned with the price, considering the premium of the XC40 Recharge over the T5.

      There are not many other SUV options, as all of them are way smaller (Model Y, Mach-E, I-Pace...) or too old and expensive (Model X).

      What should we expect from the 2022 XC90? T5, T6, T8 and Recharge? An improved T8 with a bigger range could be a compromise.

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    3. #2
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      Volvo will have one new EV model every year. So end of next year a MY2022 EV will go production. It probably is smaller than XC90 though. Wondering what it will be. Maybe S/V40? If you need a EV with 7 seats, SPA2 XC90 seems the earliest choice. Or for big 5 seater, we can wait and see if Lynkco Zero will be sold here in 2022.

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    4. #3
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      Quote Originally Posted by FusionRedXC60 View Post
      Volvo will have one new EV model every year. So end of next year a MY2022 EV will go production. It probably is smaller than XC90 though. Wondering what it will be. Maybe S/V40? If you need a EV with 7 seats, SPA2 XC90 seems the earliest choice. Or for big 5 seater, we can wait and see if Lynkco Zero will be sold here in 2022.

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      I've not seen much lately, but wouldn't the new smaller one be the C40? We've got some of our training on the new systems but it's of course focused on the XC40 recharge. I had thought the new XC90 would be out for MY22, but idk if that's changed or not.

      The pricing of the XC40 is about $13k more than a base R design (which is what the recharge is based on). If you presume that's probably about the same cost for the XC90.. it's not as bad percentage wise for the bigger vehicle, since it has a higher price to start with. And with lease residuals being on the total MSRP that would make for a better value as well on the 90 series. The residual value difference between the T8 and the T6 is only 2% different (benefit to the T6)... but honestly I think more people will want a used pure electric than a used plug in hybrid. I think the consumer perception is that you have to plug it in with PHEV without getting enough return... while with BEV you certainly plug in, I think the return is higher, so it's not a big deal. Not sure how to explain it... but just me feeling on customer perception... Regardless, for now you'll get a higher rebate due to tax incentives so maybe you'll only probably capitalize $10k of that if you're a VCOA member. $7280 would be the residualized value, meaning you'll only be paying for around $3k over the term.. not to bad if that plays out right.
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    6. #4
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      Quote Originally Posted by DFrantz View Post
      I've not seen much lately, but wouldn't the new smaller one be the C40? We've got some of our training on the new systems but it's of course focused on the XC40 recharge. I had thought the new XC90 would be out for MY22, but idk if that's changed or not.

      The pricing of the XC40 is about $13k more than a base R design (which is what the recharge is based on). If you presume that's probably about the same cost for the XC90.. it's not as bad percentage wise for the bigger vehicle, since it has a higher price to start with. And with lease residuals being on the total MSRP that would make for a better value as well on the 90 series. The residual value difference between the T8 and the T6 is only 2% different (benefit to the T6)... but honestly I think more people will want a used pure electric than a used plug in hybrid. I think the consumer perception is that you have to plug it in with PHEV without getting enough return... while with BEV you certainly plug in, I think the return is higher, so it's not a big deal. Not sure how to explain it... but just me feeling on customer perception... Regardless, for now you'll get a higher rebate due to tax incentives so maybe you'll only probably capitalize $10k of that if you're a VCOA member. $7280 would be the residualized value, meaning you'll only be paying for around $3k over the term.. not to bad if that plays out right.
      S/V40 or C40 all refer to the same model, eg, the only one lower than XC40.

      PHEV certainly cost less to own while more practical than BEV. The fuel/electricity saving on BEV compared to PHEV would never justify the price difference.
      Just that people think BEV is cool, and PHEV is old school.
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    7. #5
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      Quote Originally Posted by FusionRedXC60 View Post
      S/V40 or C40 all refer to the same model, eg, the only one lower than XC40.

      PHEV certainly cost less to own while more practical than BEV. The fuel/electricity saving on BEV compared to PHEV would never justify the price difference.
      Just that people think BEV is cool, and PHEV is old school.
      Sure, I mean, that's why we all don't ride horses... it's not so much about the economic factors as it is the cool factor. =-D
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    8. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by DFrantz View Post
      The pricing of the XC40 is about $13k more than a base R design (which is what the recharge is based on).
      Good point, it is $13k more than the XC40 T5, so can we expect a lower premium than the T6 and T8? If it is $5k to $10k more than a XC90 T6 or T8 I am in.

    9. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by carz View Post
      Good point, it is $13k more than the XC40 T5, so can we expect a lower premium than the T6 and T8? If it is $5k to $10k more than a XC90 T6 or T8 I am in.
      It is hard to say, as battery size is bigger and battery cost may change. It may be possible to be within 10k more than T6 inscription or T8 Expression. But even first year T8 inscription is more than 10k over T6 inscription.

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    10. #8
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      I'm also waiting for the fully electric XC90 My lease ends in June 2023 so it better be out by then lol
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    11. #9
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      I too want a fully electric vehicle and though I love Volvo, I'm really impressed by the Rivian, so much so that I've put a pre-order in for an R1S.
      https://rivian.com/r1s

      I hope to keep my 2008 XC-90 V8 Sport running until I can take delivery of the Rivian, likely not before late 2022. The pre-order deposit is fully refundable though, so if Volvo gets their XC-90 EV on the road earlier and it compares favorably to the Rivian (claimed 300 - 400+ mile range depending on battery option, 0-60 well under 4 secs, towing capacity of 7,500 lbs, very impressive snow/off-road performance), I'd stay with Volvo.

    12. #10
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      I have already owned 4 all electric BEV cars as well as 5 Hybrids. My current XC90 T8 is my first Plugin. We purchased this vehicle for a reason. BEV vehicles have a limitation in the availability of charging stations. Tesla has had the upper hand in this respect. However they also have been inconsistent with respect to free supercharging. Sometimes they offer free charging and other times it is not available. Also the free charging is not passed on when the car is sold. Having said that the other challenge is having a big enough charger at home to get a 100 kwh battery up and running. This is no small feat. You are talking about a minimum of 75 amps with 50 at a minimum. Getting back to other BEV vehicles, our last car was the Chevy Bolt. It would take me around 240 miles in real world freeway driving at 75 miles per hour. Every now and then I would end up having to leave really early to try and get to a fast charger. Sometimes they were busy sometimes they were not working. That was a pain in the ass. We needed a larger vehicle. The Audi Etron was nicely sized but has horrible range of 210 miles, worst then the Bolt. The newer Tesla X has a good distance but I do not like the interior of the car. The new XC 90 BEV would be a great size but I am worried about it’s range. I would be happy with a XC90 that was a plug-in that got 50 to 75 miles per charge over an all electric with less than 275 mile range. The beauty of the Tesla Supercharger stations is that they are generally well kept and have a consistency that is really important. The other types of fast chargers are pretty much privately secured and vary in their adaptors. Some of them have multiple adapters insuring that they will work on your car. But the consistency of amperage is not there. Audi and Porsche have promised? to install fast DC chargers. However they cannot install enough across the nation. This is really an opportunity for the Government to set up stations.

      There is really a big difference in using an electric car for travel or business use versus local commuting. We are getting there but it will still take some time.
      Last edited by drmanny3; 10-19-2020 at 01:22 PM.
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    13. #11
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      I might note that while a range of 275 seems really great. Wait till you are going on a trip. So for us from Santa Barbara to visit my Wife's Sister in Phoenix means about 350 miles. So when you have a range of 275 you don't wait for the fumes cause if you miss a charging spot you may not hook up with another one soon enough to prevent anxiety setting in. So you head out towards Palm Springs and then look for a DC fast charger. Depending on what time of day it is you will be competing with others. You can opt to reserve it and bet that you will get there in time. You can just show up. Often there is no place to have a cup of anything. You just have to wait it out. A DC charger that is not one of the newer ones will only give you a so many kwh in 30 minutes. You may need to do 2 back to back to get close to 80% to 90% charge. Now you have a shorter range and you need to think about where you will stop again as you get into the Phoenix area. Also while the EPA might list 275 the real world at 75 mph will really consume the battery. Just saying..... And I do want Volvo to continue with their electronification but at an accelerated rate.
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    14. #12
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      Quote Originally Posted by drmanny3 View Post
      I might note that while a range of 275 seems really great. Wait till you are going on a trip. So for us from Santa Barbara to visit my Wife's Sister in Phoenix means about 350 miles. So when you have a range of 275 you don't wait for the fumes cause if you miss a charging spot you may not hook up with another one soon enough to prevent anxiety setting in. So you head out towards Palm Springs and then look for a DC fast charger. Depending on what time of day it is you will be competing with others. You can opt to reserve it and bet that you will get there in time. You can just show up. Often there is no place to have a cup of anything. You just have to wait it out. A DC charger that is not one of the newer ones will only give you a so many kwh in 30 minutes. You may need to do 2 back to back to get close to 80% to 90% charge. Now you have a shorter range and you need to think about where you will stop again as you get into the Phoenix area. Also while the EPA might list 275 the real world at 75 mph will really consume the battery. Just saying..... And I do want Volvo to continue with their electronification but at an accelerated rate.
      That's why a few car makers are setting up battery swapping stations in China, a technology Tesla decided not to use.
      The quickest one takes 1.5 minutes to swap out and new battery in. It is the real solution for long distance trip.
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    15. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by CharlieRN View Post
      I too want a fully electric vehicle and though I love Volvo, I'm really impressed by the Rivian, so much so that I've put a pre-order in for an R1S.
      https://rivian.com/r1s
      Forgot about the Rivian, not my favourite style, but it could work if the price is right.

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