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    1. #1

      Post Transmission Fluid Change ...

      I currenty sit at 180,000kms, and believe the previous owner(s_) never changed the transmission fluid. The car runs fine, but I occasionally catch it slipping / hard shifting, especially when the weather is hot, the car's at full temperature, and I'm driving in the city with lots af stop and go's ... Going from R to D, is especially hard sometimes. Am I looking at selonoid change here, or will some new fluid aleviate this behavior?

      I have watched every youtube video under the Sun how to do the drain and fill, that is not the problem, but I have a hard time deciding on which oil to buy. The OEM Volvo oil, or Aisin Type IV that sells locally for half the price.

      What do you guys put in your cars?

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    3. #2
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      Toyota T-IV or Mobil 3309, or other equivalents (Aisin, Idemitsu TLS (or something like that)). The JWS3309 is what Aisin designed the transmission around. Volvo is not going to do anything better for you, only them. I can get the 3309 (as Toyota T-IV) for under $5/qt at the Toyota dealership; talk nicely to them and they will give you a "good guy" discount. Other affordable sources are six-packs of it from Amazon or Summit Racing as Mobil JWS3309 - same thing effectively.

      Your "garage shift" (R to D, or N to D, etc.) is likely mounts. Crawl underneath and grab the lower mount and see if it's loose. If so, there's a more robust (and $6) fix you can find on MVS. (use dorman shock absorber bushings pressed in - easy to do with a c-clamp). Check the upper mount/support, too.

      Before you flush, I highly recommend running some Chemtool B-12 in it for a little while. SeaFoam works too, though it takes more. Adding some Lubegard Red in with the fill at the end is smart. The Chemtool will remove varnish, etc., soften hardened solenoid seals. It cured any desire to slip or flare in mine left after correcting the broken mounts/supports.

      IF the AT was neglected, likely the PS. Do basically the same to it - additive to clean, then flush. But use Lubegard PSF - screaming deal on it on ebay right now.

      I would replace the four cooler line o-rings. two upper, two lower. They were only like 30 cents each from RM European, I put them in alongside another bigger parts order. Great place for haldex oil, light bulbs, crush-washers, air filters, oil filters, and lots of other parts, too.
      Last edited by Oro-o; 10-27-2020 at 01:12 AM.
      Volvo: 2004 XC70, 124k mi (10/20), Nautic Blau/Oak, 2004 S60 2.5t AWD 133k mi (10/20), Black Saphire Metallic//Beige/light Sand
      Other now: 2002 ES300, 1998 Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), 1991 Audi V8 5-speed
      Past/other: Several BMWs, '76 2002 and up. Done with that a while ago. A lot of motorcycles and some fine gaited horses.

    4. #3
      Toyota T-IV or Mobil 3309, or other equivalents (Aisin, Idemitsu TLS (or something like that)). The JWS3309 is what Aisin designed the transmission around. Volvo is not going to do anything better for you, only them. I can get the 3309 (as Toyota T-IV) for under $5/qt at the Toyota dealership; talk nicely to them and they will give you a "good guy" discount. Other affordable sources are six-packs of it from Amazon or Summit Racing as Mobil JWS3309 - same thing effectively.

      Cool beans. I'll go to Toyota tomorrow, and see about the T-IV.

      Your "garage shift" (R to D, or N to D, etc.) is likely mounts. Crawl underneath and grab the lower mount and see if it's loose. If so, there's a more robust (and $6) fix you can find on MVS. (use dorman shock absorber bushings pressed in - easy to do with a c-clamp). Check the upper mount/support, too.

      I changed the lower torque mount yesterday with a brand new one, the smaller bushing was totally ripped, but changing it did not change the R to D jerk. I'll see about the upper, lower right, and the other two mounts.

      Before you flush, I highly recommend running some Chemtool B-12 in it for a little while. SeaFoam works too, though it takes more. Adding some Lubegard Red in with the fill at the end is smart. The Chemtool will remove varnish, etc., soften hardened solenoid seals. It cured any desire to slip or flare in mine left after correcting the broken mounts/supports.

      I am afraid to do a full flush, but think of doing a few of drain and fills over the next few kms, if I add seafoam/chemtool, I'd have to flush it all out then. What about Lubegard Red, can I add that during the drain and fills.

      IF the AT was neglected, likely the PS. Do basically the same to it - additive to clean, then flush. But use Lubegard PSF - screaming deal on it on ebay right now.

      I would replace the four cooler line o-rings. two upper, two lower. They were only like 30 cents each from RM European, I put them in alongside another bigger parts order. Great place for haldex oil, light bulbs, crush-washers, air filters, oil filters, and lots of other parts, too.

      Not familiar with the cooler o-rings, I'll have to research that a little more. What effect will that have, keep the oil cooler I assume.

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    6. #4
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      This says it all:
      https://youtu.be/o690DovjDAc

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    7. #5
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      On my previous 02 2.4T, I used Toyota T-IV for ~$6/l from a Toyota dealer shortly after I bought the car with 108K km on it. Over three sessions, I ran 18l through a series of three drain and fills.

      And spliced in a Magnefine AT filter for total protection. Along with upgrading the B4 servo cover, the car was shifting perfectly at 148K km when I sold it.
      2001 V70 T5M
      2010 XC70 T6

    8. #6
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      If you choose the approach that does not have you taking any hoses off (ie simple drain and fill)I would recommend leaving the o-rings well alone especially if you are in rust belt. Iíve had some trouble getting these rigid hoses off due to corrosion and often you end up loosening the pipe only to realize that you canít get it off without a couple more hours of cursing.


      2002 V70XC, 2003 V40, 2004 S60, 2010 V70
      2010 V70 3.2 125,000miles
      2002 V70XC, 175,000 miles
      2004 S60 2.5T, 160,000 miles

    9. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by VincentVegaV70 View Post


      Before you flush, I highly recommend running some Chemtool B-12 in it for a little while. SeaFoam works too, though it takes more. Adding some Lubegard Red in with the fill at the end is smart. The Chemtool will remove varnish, etc., soften hardened solenoid seals. It cured any desire to slip or flare in mine left after correcting the broken mounts/supports.

      I am afraid to do a full flush, but think of doing a few of drain and fills over the next few kms, if I add seafoam/chemtool, I'd have to flush it all out then. What about Lubegard Red, can I add that during the drain and fills.

      Fair enough. It's quite easy to avoid lifting, removing the pan, etc. I went to Ace hardware and got 6' of 1/2" ID x 3/4" OD braided clear hose. If you pop off the cooler return line, you can jam this in the outlet and it will seal nicely (FCP Euro used to sell a kit that worked like this I found out later). Run the hose over to a clear container and use the pump to take out about 2 to 3 qts at a time. Repeat as many times as you want - no need to lift the car, mess with the pan, etc. Add the lubegard when you are done with either that or as many drain/fills as you want. You dont' want to pump any of it out.

      If you don't want to do that, do perhaps 2 x drain fills, running the car at idle five minutes in-between (this will be enough time to fully mix the oil and new fluid). This will get you to 50% new fluid total; not ideal but better. Then do another one when you can or "soonish" vs waiting years.

      Not familiar with the cooler o-rings, I'll have to research that a little more. What effect will that have, keep the oil cooler I assume.
      The cooler line o-rings compress and harden, my car with mileage very similar to yours had them weeping on both input and return lines. This also in a much milder climate than yours (unless you are in Vancouver?). The input line is down lower and you may not be able to reach it easily w/o the bumper off, so you may want to skip that. If you are just doing a drain/fill, you might skip this - I had my bumper off for an auxiliary cooler installation so getting at the lower fitting and weeping o-rings was easier. But if you take the upper cooler connection off to get easy access, the o-rings are on the end of the line fitting. Yellow. Reference note: at the radiator, the lower connection is the transmission output (hot oil)/cooler input line and the upper one that is much more easily accessible at the top of the radiator is the fluid return line/cooler output line.

      If you choose the pump-out route, getting the hard line off is a little unusual vs. many connectors, but not hard. A) pinch the green plastic locking mechanism, and with your other hand B) have a long handled screwdriver, or even a small pry-bar, and lever against the long vertical body of the return line. It will pop out easily straight backwards. The problem is the o-rings harden and adhere a bit to the fitting and make getting it out a little difficult after it's been neglected/not serviced and the o-rings have been allowed to bake in there for miles and years. A new pair installed will make the next removal a one-hand affair.

      A good practice on almost any AT car acquired north of 100k and with unknown transmission history is: clean and flush the system, install all new fluid. Then drain/fill the pan (or pump out if easier - on many it is depending up the transmission cooler arrangement) every 25 to 30k mi and never do a full exchange/flush again. Keeping an ounce/qt of Lubegard additive in the system is smart (or using Lubegard fluid) as while it has some anti-wear additives, the real magic is the base oil itself, which is ester. It keeps seals from hardening and it also lines the case and aids heat transfer as it's highly polar. It also keeps debris from accumulating for that reason, so if you install an additional inline-filter, you'll keep the fluid much cleaner, longer. The chemistry on this is real and the results quantifiable; it's not a "snake oil" additive like Lucas Oil Stabilizer or others.

      If you measure what you take out and replace the same, you should be good. Remember you check the AT fill level with the car running, not off like an engine. Residual oil in the fill tube will make reading it difficult until that drains out so you may need to wait 20 to 30 minutes after finishing it to get an accurate reading on the dipstick.

      While I am a big proponent of a full fluid swap (and it's VERY easy to do on this car vs. most modern cars), the bottom line is that any transmission service is good, and some methods are better. None are bad. A drain and fill on a higher-mileage car is easiest, though least efficient, but if it makes more sense to you then do that a couple times, preferably three (to get to about 75% new fluid). If you *think* you want to try the full flush, I can walk your through it, type out explicit instructions.

      PS - hey how did you get the heat gun to re-color your trim up to the paint line? (I asked in the other thread but you likely didn't see it) I am trying to do the same on an S60 and it's a little tricky to not damage the paint.
      Last edited by Oro-o; 10-27-2020 at 04:55 PM.
      Volvo: 2004 XC70, 124k mi (10/20), Nautic Blau/Oak, 2004 S60 2.5t AWD 133k mi (10/20), Black Saphire Metallic//Beige/light Sand
      Other now: 2002 ES300, 1998 Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), 1991 Audi V8 5-speed
      Past/other: Several BMWs, '76 2002 and up. Done with that a while ago. A lot of motorcycles and some fine gaited horses.

    10. #8
      Quote Originally Posted by Oro-o View Post
      The cooler line o-rings compress and harden, my car with mileage very similar to yours had them weeping on both input and return lines. This also in a much milder climate than yours (unless you are in Vancouver?). The input line is down lower and you may not be able to reach it easily w/o the bumper off, so you may want to skip that. If you are just doing a drain/fill, you might skip this - I had my bumper off for an auxiliary cooler installation so getting at the lower fitting and weeping o-rings was easier. But if you take the upper cooler connection off to get easy access, the o-rings are on the end of the line fitting. Yellow. Reference note: at the radiator, the lower connection is the transmission output (hot oil)/cooler input line and the upper one that is much more easily accessible at the top of the radiator is the fluid return line/cooler output line.

      If you choose the pump-out route, getting the hard line off is a little unusual vs. many connectors, but not hard. A) pinch the green plastic locking mechanism, and with your other hand B) have a long handled screwdriver, or even a small pry-bar, and lever against the long vertical body of the return line. It will pop out easily straight backwards. The problem is the o-rings harden and adhere a bit to the fitting and make getting it out a little difficult after it's been neglected/not serviced and the o-rings have been allowed to bake in there for miles and years. A new pair installed will make the next removal a one-hand affair.

      A good practice on almost any AT car acquired north of 100k and with unknown transmission history is: clean and flush the system, install all new fluid. Then drain/fill the pan (or pump out if easier - on many it is depending up the transmission cooler arrangement) every 25 to 30k mi and never do a full exchange/flush again. Keeping an ounce/qt of Lubegard additive in the system is smart (or using Lubegard fluid) as while it has some anti-wear additives, the real magic is the base oil itself, which is ester. It keeps seals from hardening and it also lines the case and aids heat transfer as it's highly polar. It also keeps debris from accumulating for that reason, so if you install an additional inline-filter, you'll keep the fluid much cleaner, longer. The chemistry on this is real and the results quantifiable; it's not a "snake oil" additive like Lucas Oil Stabilizer or others.

      If you measure what you take out and replace the same, you should be good. Remember you check the AT fill level with the car running, not off like an engine. Residual oil in the fill tube will make reading it difficult until that drains out so you may need to wait 20 to 30 minutes after finishing it to get an accurate reading on the dipstick.

      While I am a big proponent of a full fluid swap (and it's VERY easy to do on this car vs. most modern cars), the bottom line is that any transmission service is good, and some methods are better. None are bad. A drain and fill on a higher-mileage car is easiest, though least efficient, but if it makes more sense to you then do that a couple times, preferably three (to get to about 75% new fluid). If you *think* you want to try the full flush, I can walk your through it, type out explicit instructions.

      PS - hey how did you get the heat gun to re-color your trim up to the paint line? (I asked in the other thread but you likely didn't see it) I am trying to do the same on an S60 and it's a little tricky to not damage the paint.
      Thank you so much for amazing information, and your time to write all this out. Much much appreciated. I will most likely go the drain and fill method, will spread them over a few thousand kms, and see where we stand, and once most of the old fluid is out, I will do a proper flush. I also bought some Lubegard Red today, so how much do you reckon I need to put in with a drain and fill? Do I add enough for the whole oil inside the transmissions or only with the new oil I am putting in.

      As for the heat gun method, if you pass over the plastic rather quickly and not stay in one place for too long, the paint won't be affected, I only found that around the front bumper the paint started to heat up and slightly buldge, so I used aluminum foil that I wedged in between the trim piece and the painted area to defect some heat and that worked great, you'll see it's super easy to track the black coming back to life. Start on the rear bumper, you have the most area to practice on.

    11. #9
      Another question, and this might be dumb, but bear with me.

      I purchased a 10oz/296ml of the lubegard red bottle. For the first few drain and fills, how much lubegard red should I put into the transmission, if according to their conversion chart, only 3.2qt/3L comes out with a service fill, and 8qt/7.6L is the total fill of the transmission. So should I put 8oz of the red + ( 3.2qt - 8oz) = 2.95qt of new oil. But how much red do I put in with the next drain and fill? Not another 8oz I assume, because not all red will drain out with the second d/f. I hope my question makes sense. So do I only add corresponding to the new liquid added, which is 3.2oz.

    12. #10
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      To get a good feel for the partial drain/fill math, take a look at this google sheet. I made this several years ago for a Lexus forum to try to help people see the numbers and then decide which way to go:

      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...E54/edit#gid=0

      You see the quickly diminishing returns of each subsequent d/f. If I were dead against doing it in one go, I'd do three d/f's in short order, then add the Lubegard once I wasn't going to be doing any more d/f for a while. As you can see it takes about 6 or 7 drain and fills to get to about the % new fluid as one session pump/fill. But getting up to about 3/4 new fluid is pretty good (usually about three d/f's on most all transmissions).

      I set the drain capacity in the sheet above to 3.5 qts; I did drain my pan on the XC and I think that's what I got. Even though I was pumping out fully, I did that so I could start with a clean pan of Dex III (I have some quality Chevron DexIII I got at like a $1/qt). I did that because then as the first pan of fluid goes into the torque converter, which is effectively a big 3 to 4qt turbine mixing bowl, it all mixes with the old fluid and you never are pushing clean against old, it's mixing with the nasty old in a big space. This way I get the TQ maybe 60 or 70% clean fluid before I push in my T-IV. (T-IV is based off DexIII and they are somewhat compatible. You can actually use DexIII to top-up a T-IV system or run it a short period - Toyota and Aisin say that). After I pre-load the torque converter then I will go through nine or 10 bottles of T-IV/3309 and then call it good. I will then have very, very little old fluid in and maybe 10% DexIII I estimate, but way better that than only 90% new fluid and 10% very bad fluid. Of course you could just run 12 bottles of T-IV through it, but since I know this is compatible and I have cheap DexIII, I save a few dollars.

      Ok, I gotta go figure out why my block is not draining coolant on the S60 (?) - I can answer more later if needed. I saw your heating tip in the other thread and thanked you there.
      Last edited by Oro-o; 10-28-2020 at 08:54 PM.
      Volvo: 2004 XC70, 124k mi (10/20), Nautic Blau/Oak, 2004 S60 2.5t AWD 133k mi (10/20), Black Saphire Metallic//Beige/light Sand
      Other now: 2002 ES300, 1998 Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), 1991 Audi V8 5-speed
      Past/other: Several BMWs, '76 2002 and up. Done with that a while ago. A lot of motorcycles and some fine gaited horses.

    13. #11
      First drain and fill completed. The liquid was brown, and definitely old, didnít smell burnt, but the drain plug did have some residue accumulated on the magnet. Drained about 3.5L, measures carefully the new oil and replaced it.

      Went for a small drive, didnít really notice much much change, but weíll see when it gets hot and in the city. Iíll do another drain and fill in two weeks, followed by one more at the end of the month.

      Alright. Alright. Alright.




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    14. #12
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      That looks like typical well-used fluid, no alarm bells or issues. The color to focus on is the streaks or "legs" running down. The fluid color is ok but the tips of the drops are much darker - you've got a fair amount of contaminant in suspension in the fluid. Obviously the color of the fluid hints at that, but this way you can discriminate btw. regular wear and burned fluid from a pic. vs. in person.

      Here's a transmission shift issue on these cars I'm pondering. Among all the common complaints - garage shift, (parking/sitting clunk), flares, etc. - fixing the mounts and flushing the transmission cured everything except the occasional flare from a rolling decel/acceleration. iv'e seen others comment on this (e.g., - slow down in a long glide to say 30 for a curve or fwy. ramp off-throttle, then get on it to get back up to highway speed).

      After driving the S60 for a week I realized my tcv was "failed safe" - e.g., stuck in very low boost mode from failure as they are designed to do when they wear out. I put in a functioning TCV and the car was peppy and eager finally. Now I notice the one freeway on-ramp where I always go that response - it's gone.

      I can speculate that the slip could in fact be commanded, though not intentionally. The ecu is expecting more torque at that point so is not pressurizing the clutch pack as highly. Possible, not certain as I don't know the programming patterns of this ecu. I have to go drive the car some more to see if I can re-create that common issue that some people I've read just said was normal. I'm not sure it is.
      Last edited by Oro-o; 10-29-2020 at 09:19 PM.
      Volvo: 2004 XC70, 124k mi (10/20), Nautic Blau/Oak, 2004 S60 2.5t AWD 133k mi (10/20), Black Saphire Metallic//Beige/light Sand
      Other now: 2002 ES300, 1998 Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), 1991 Audi V8 5-speed
      Past/other: Several BMWs, '76 2002 and up. Done with that a while ago. A lot of motorcycles and some fine gaited horses.

    15. #13
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      Quote Originally Posted by VincentVegaV70 View Post
      .

      Alright. Alright. Alright.


      Is it Stout season already?
      2005 XC70 Crystal Green | Hilton | 16T | Bad Swede | 145k mi

    16. #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Oro-o View Post

      Here's a transmission shift issue on these cars I'm pondering. Among all the common complaints - garage shift, (parking/sitting clunk), flares, etc. - fixing the mounts and flushing the transmission cured everything except the occasional flare from a rolling decel/acceleration. iv'e seen others comment on this (e.g., - slow down in a long glide to say 30 for a curve or fwy. ramp off-throttle, then get on it to get back up to highway speed).
      Yeah, I noticed that too. I sometimes think itís not a transmission issue, but an ecu issue, like if the car is stuck ďthinkingĒ and not being sure what to do in that specific situation, ďWhat do I do? What do I do?Ē moment. Itís weird, but I usually catch it if letís say Iím on the throttle, then off, brake, and I turn to a street thatís a steep downhill, so now the car continues to accelerate with gravity, and the car is kinda stuck thinking, **** what gear should I go in?

      Itís weird. You might be into something.


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    17. #15
      Quote Originally Posted by Antherzoll View Post
      Is it Stout season already?
      Lolz. Almost.


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    18. #16
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      Quote Originally Posted by VincentVegaV70 View Post
      Lolz. Almost.
      I thought it was always Stout season. Just hope that it tastes better than motor oil.
      Last edited by 1200cc; 11-06-2020 at 01:24 PM.

    19. #17
      Almost time for round two of the drain and fill. Once done, should I get an adaptation done?

    20. #18
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      I would not be getting it adapted. Unless the box is really playing up. And even then you may as well wait until the fluid is nice and red, after a few more drop and refills.
      One of the main reasons for doing a dit at the time is to get the car used to the change a bit at a time.

      You can set the normal fluid change counter to zero
      Silver 2006 V70 D5 manual FWD, Dead and being stripped.
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    21. #19
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      My understanding is the that all the adaptation does is speed up the process, not trigger it. Regular driving will slowly adapt the parameters and eventually get you there anyway. This is what I've READ, not what I know as fact. And on the rest I totally agree with rogerb.
      Volvo: 2004 XC70, 124k mi (10/20), Nautic Blau/Oak, 2004 S60 2.5t AWD 133k mi (10/20), Black Saphire Metallic//Beige/light Sand
      Other now: 2002 ES300, 1998 Acura SLX (Isuzu Trooper), 1991 Audi V8 5-speed
      Past/other: Several BMWs, '76 2002 and up. Done with that a while ago. A lot of motorcycles and some fine gaited horses.

    22. #20
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      Quote Originally Posted by VincentVegaV70 View Post
      Almost time for round two of the drain and fill. Once done, should I get an adaptation done?
      Just reset the counter, don't do adaptation, at least that's the advice I've seen and what I follow. I did 3x 4qt changes with Mobil 3309 on my '01 a few years ago (through the trans cooler pipe, didn't pull the drain plug, probably should do that some day...), added a Magnefine on the return line (upper hose) and it's been running great since. I too had only minor flares at times, and an occasional rough shift. None of that since. My XC still shifts a bit better, but it has half the miles and has had the fluid tended to once already. The V70 went somewhere between 105k and 150k without a fluid change.

      Make sure you check the fluid level when the transmission is hot (I've found that 20min of light driving gets it to the correct temp as viewed through VIDA) and the engine is running. The level should land between the 2 "hot" lines. It's only .2L between the marks as I recall, and being out of range does make a noticeable difference in how it behaves!
      2001 V70 Silver - 200k miles
      2006 XC70 Ocean Race - 96K miles
      (Past: '94 944 turbo, sold at ~220k miles)

    23. #21
      Quote Originally Posted by madmattd View Post
      Just reset the counter, don't do adaptation, at least that's the advice I've seen and what I follow. I did 3x 4qt changes with Mobil 3309 on my '01 a few years ago (through the trans cooler pipe, didn't pull the drain plug, probably should do that some day...), added a Magnefine on the return line (upper hose) and it's been running great since. I too had only minor flares at times, and an occasional rough shift. None of that since. My XC still shifts a bit better, but it has half the miles and has had the fluid tended to once already. The V70 went somewhere between 105k and 150k without a fluid change.

      Make sure you check the fluid level when the transmission is hot (I've found that 20min of light driving gets it to the correct temp as viewed through VIDA) and the engine is running. The level should land between the 2 "hot" lines. It's only .2L between the marks as I recall, and being out of range does make a noticeable difference in how it behaves!
      Great. I get it warm for sure, and then I measure exactly how much I took out, and how much I put back in. I have it right between the hot lines now. The reset has to be done at the dealer I assume, or is that something that can be done at home.

    24. #22
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      Quote Originally Posted by VincentVegaV70 View Post
      Great. I get it warm for sure, and then I measure exactly how much I took out, and how much I put back in. I have it right between the hot lines now. The reset has to be done at the dealer I assume, or is that something that can be done at home.
      If you have a Vida+Dice setup (Volvo software+tool), you can do it at home. Otherwise, yea it's a dealer thing. Personally I probably wouldn't bother with the counter reset if you have to go to a dealer for that. If you do enough of your own work though, a Dice box and Vida install will be very useful.
      2001 V70 Silver - 200k miles
      2006 XC70 Ocean Race - 96K miles
      (Past: '94 944 turbo, sold at ~220k miles)

    25. #23
      Quote Originally Posted by madmattd View Post
      If you have a Vida+Dice setup (Volvo software+tool), you can do it at home. Otherwise, yea it's a dealer thing. Personally I probably wouldn't bother with the counter reset if you have to go to a dealer for that. If you do enough of your own work though, a Dice box and Vida install will be very useful.
      Nah, don't have the vida/dice at the moment. I have to keep it real with this car, its our second car and don't plan to spend too much money on it, but have come to realize that I really love working on it, and treat it as a learning experience. I obviously want to keep it on the road as long as possible, but there come a time where it becomes a negative investment (all cars I guess) with $ and time. So far so good, but I hope I won't have to change the valve body ...

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