How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) get away with this?
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    1. #1
      Member Kaizai's Avatar
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      How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) get away with this?

      United The United States Goverment runs this website. How does this pass, it is full of crap.

      Take this for example.


      Hyundai Elantra at the Goverment
      Frontal Driver's Side:
      Frontal Passenger's Side:
      Side Impact Front Occupant:
      Side Impact Rear Occupant:
      Sounds like a pretty safe car, if you were foolish enough to take this as fact you could think you were a smart consumer finding out information about a car before you buy it, and you would be happy with your new car purchuse untill you get in an accident and find out the results are probably closer to the ones below.

      Hyundai Elantra at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

      My favorite part was this.
      "RESTRAINTS/DUMMY KINEMATICS: POOR In the first test, dummy movement was reasonably well controlled, although the dummy's head did strike the steering wheel through the frontal airbag. During rebound, the deployed side airbag kept the dummy's head away from the B-pillar. In the second test, the frontal airbag deployed late (76 milliseconds, compared with a typical 30 milliseconds), and the dummy's head hit the steering wheel. Also, the driver seat came loose on one of its tracks and moved forward 3 inches on the right side, where the safety belt is anchored. Both of the dummy's legs jammed against the instrument panel. The left shin contacted an exposed metal edge, and the right knee hit just below the ignition switch, producing gashes in the vinyl "skin" at the dummy's left shin and right knee. During rebound, the deployed side airbag kept the dummy's head away from the B-pillar. In the third test, the frontal airbag also deployed late (64 milliseconds), and the dummy's head struck the steering wheel through the airbag. The side airbag did not deploy in this test, and during rebound the dummy's head hit the B-pillar."

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    3. #2

      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) get away with this? (Kaizai)

      sheesh...

      you really get what you pay for i guess....


    4. #3
      Junior Member javadoc's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) get away with this? (Kaizai)

      This is a prime example of why I don't give the NHTSA a bit of respect... they're results are merde more often than not. I usually use the IIHS site when researching crash results. The IIHS is run by insurance companies and I always feel that they're testing standards are much higher than the Gov't's 'standards.' NHTSA... unsafe at any test.

      Look at the pictures below. The front passenger seat slides forward about 2" in a 40mph crash. Nice to know that a vehicle that the Gov't says gets, what, on frontal crashes (passenger side), can shove an occupant a couple of inches closer to the airbag. That and it seems fairly obvious that the driver would've sustained some nifty knee/leg injuries when they punched through the knee bolster.


      quote:

      TOP LEFT: Action shot taken during the second of three frontal offset crash tests

      TOP RIGHT: The driver's survival space was maintained well, as indicated by the dummy's position in relation to the steering wheel and instrument panel after the third crash test.

      BOTTOM LEFT: The seat latch failed to hold on the inboard (right) side, and the right side of the seat moved forward during the second crash test. The extent of seat movement is indicated by separation of the yellow paint marks (inset).

      BOTTOM RIGHT: Smeared red greasepaint shows where the dummy's left shin contacted and broke the plastic knee bolster, exposing a sharp edge of the underlying metal plate that gashed the vinyl "skin" just below the knee.


      FWIW, they rate the car as:

      Frontal offset crash test results

      Overall: Poor

      Structure/safety cage: Good

      Injury measures:
      Head/neck: Poor

      Chest: Good

      Leg/foot, left: Marginal

      Leg/foot, right: Marginal

      Restraints/dummy kinematics: Poor




      [Modified by javadoc, 11:17 AM 2-23-2003]


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    6. #4

      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (javadoc)

      same with the Montana, Venture minivans. In their commerical they boast "5 star safety rating"

      not only was it only 5 stars for ONLY side impact but its a rating by NHTSA

      great for fooling the average moms and dads tho


    7. #5
      Junior Member javadoc's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (xtremepsionic)

      Yes, that is one vehicle (three really, the Montana triplets) that shouldn't be on the road, imho. Death traps disquised as your 'safe' family haulers. I've been waiting for the wrongful death suits against GM for those minivans. It reminds me of the Chevy truck fuel tank suits of years past.

      It's really a tragedy that people are meant to believe and, literally, stake theirs and the lives of their families on what the NHTSA reports.


      [Modified by javadoc, 5:51 PM 2-23-2003]


    8. #6

      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

      NHTSA doesn't do crap with the crash tests. I think they just run the car into a wall and say "uh, looks good"

    9. #7

      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (anony00gt)

      Absolutely correct! NHTSA is living in a fantasy world - their results have little bearing in the real world.

    10. #8
      Member kowalski's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) get away with this? (Kaizai)

      Most of you all have no doubt seen the movie 'Fight Club'. For those that have, do you remember the part where Edward Norton's character fills someone in on what it is he does? He is an accident inspector for a car company and it's his job to go find out the causes of major death involving their vehicles. He has just finished explaining to someone about how the companies will produce a vehicle with an inherently bad design, sell it, injure many, and then weasle their way out. Then he's asked what car company he works for, and much to the horrified man's dismay, he replies, "A major one." I would venture a guess that this may be very much the case in real life. It all just makes me glad that someone in Gothenburg thought of the people who would be driving their product.

      My friends know that I am a staunch Volvo fanatic and they always try to get me to admit to the safety of other cars or as is often the case, their own cars as if they were trying to justify driving a coffin in the first place. But I end up shaking my head. Mercedes and Saab, I tell them are really the only ones that I would put up there with Volvo as far as being safe from most sorts of calamities you find on the road save the occasional confused and mis-directed Peterbilt.

      I have been told stories in club meetings about members wrecking their Volvos through their own fault or no, and walking from what would have been certain doom if they had piloted other cars. More often than not, stories like those still the verbal abuse I take from others on account of my car. I tell them I'd rather drive my Swedish box than be caught dead in a pine box.

      I love my Volvo.


    11. #9
      Member Kaizai's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (kowalski)

      quote:
      Most of you all have no doubt seen the movie 'Fight Club'. For those that have, do you remember the part where Edward Norton's character fills someone in on what it is he does? He is an accident inspector for a car company and it's his job to go find out the causes of major death involving their vehicles. He has just finished explaining to someone about how the companies will produce a vehicle with an inherently bad design, sell it, injure many, and then weasle their way out. Then he's asked what car company he works for, and much to the horrified man's dismay, he replies, "A major one." I would venture a guess that this may be very much the case in real life. It all just makes me glad that someone in Gothenburg thought of the people who would be driving their product.

      My friends know that I am a staunch Volvo fanatic and they always try to get me to admit to the safety of other cars or as is often the case, their own cars as if they were trying to justify driving a coffin in the first place. But I end up shaking my head. Mercedes and Saab, I tell them are really the only ones that I would put up there with Volvo as far as being safe from most sorts of calamities you find on the road save the occasional confused and mis-directed Peterbilt.

      I have been told stories in club meetings about members wrecking their Volvos through their own fault or no, and walking from what would have been certain doom if they had piloted other cars. More often than not, stories like those still the verbal abuse I take from others on account of my car. I tell them I'd rather drive my Swedish box than be caught dead in a pine box.

      I love my Volvo.


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    12. #10
      Member 24Hours's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (kowalski)

      Kowalski:
      Great reference! Do you also remember the not-so-subtle abbreviation of the hypothetical company by which Ed Norton was employed? Give up? FMC. Yup... Federated Motors Corp or some not-too loose reference to Ford. And the car that he was examining in the warehouse: it was a Lincoln towncar. Hm, someone must have had a Ford vendetta in that movie. Maybe the boys at Ford wanted to learn a bit about safety (among other things!) when they bought Volvo. I may never drive anything but Volvo. I can't wait for my new V70R!


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    13. #11
      Member kowalski's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (24Hours)

      It's been a long time since I saw the movie, but that was one of the things that I thought entirely too hilarious. That whole flick was fairly cerebral. I liked Being John Malkovich too. It was a little weird.

      But it's really good to know that there are folks like the bunch of you that believe in safe vehicles like ours. I like to tell co-workers that if everyone had a Volvo, (as unrealistic as that is) the world would be a better place. The way I figure it, everyone who drove responsibly would be safe from those who don't to some degree, and those who drive like they are pretending to be Fangio but can't will survive to face the consequences.

      'And the World...Would be a better place..for you...(for you) and me...(and me)...And the world.......'

      Life is short, extend it. Drive a Volvo.


    14. #12
      Member Kaizai's Avatar
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      Re: How does the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (kowalski)

      quote:

      Life is short, extend it. Drive a Volvo.


      (non-alcoholic of corse)

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